W200 Ppt

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W200 Ppt

  1. 1. Visual Perspectives Jeff Bleicher ENG W 200
  2. 2. Attraction Learning Emotinal Display
  3. 3. “ Overall, experts say, men are visual beings and focus on the physical; woman view attractiveness as more than just looks.” ~Jayson
  4. 4. men [view] women with wide eyes and large lips as more attractive and more likely open to short-term sexual relationships.
  5. 5. Men with more masculine features, such as squarer jaws, larger noses and smaller eyes, were perceived by women who looked at their photos as good for casual sex but unfaithful long-term partners
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  8. 8. <ul><li>Aha – “ Good looks was the primary stimulus for attraction in both sexes” </li></ul>
  9. 10. <ul><li>“ This new insight into visual attention could lead to novel teaching strategies to help people with sensory impairment after stroke or attention deficit disorder.” </li></ul><ul><li>~Dragoi </li></ul><ul><li>(April 2009) </li></ul>
  10. 12. elocutionary discourse: “ the wealth of utterances and practices—some literary, some oral, some graphic, some somatic—which in different ways contributed to the construction of eighteenth-century understandings of bodily eloquence .” ~Paul Goring 2005 V aposiopesis: “ the rhetorical device whereby a speaker comes to an abrupt halt as if unable to continue speaking.” ~Pascoe 2009
  11. 13. “ By the midpoint of [the 18 th Century], only half the British population was literate.” ~Pascoe
  12. 14. Aha – “polite discourse is, in a sense, itself aposiopetic.” ~Goring
  13. 15. <ul><li>Quite frankly, today’s society revolves around visual appeal for every form of communication. </li></ul>
  14. 16. <ul><li>Jayson, Sharon. (2009, Feb. 11). USA Today. Science asks: What’s the attraction? Retrieved April 21, 2009 from http://infotrac.galegroup.com.proxy.ulib.iupui.edu/itw/infomark/1/1/1/purl=rc1_BRC_0_CJ193433230?sw_aep=iulib_iupui </li></ul><ul><li>Pascoe, Judith. (2009). Duke University Press. Emotional Display and National Identity. Retrieved April 22, 2009 from </li></ul><ul><li>http://muse.jhu.edu.proxy.ulib.iupui.edu/journals/eighteenth-century_life/v033/33.1.pascoe.html </li></ul><ul><li>Dragoi, Valentin. (2009, April 20) Mental Health Weekly Digest. Retrieved April 22, 2009 from </li></ul><ul><li>http://find.galegroup.com.proxy.ulib.iupui.edu/itx/infomark.do?action=interpret&searchType=AdvancedSearchForm&type=retrieve&prodId=HRCA&docId=A198054892&version=1.0&userGroupName=iulib_iupui&finalAuth=true </li></ul>

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