Pinellas County Extension Green Office2

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  • The webinar you have joined has a couple of tools that will enhance you learning experience today. These tools are controlled by the dashboard. When you arrived today it looked like this. In about 10 seconds it collapsed to
  • This. To re-expand it press the double arrows.
  • To keep the dashboard open, press view
  • Then click the Auto-Hide Control panel selection. This will keep the dashboard open.
  • Another way for you to interact with me is by asking questions. You do this by typing your question into the box below the Question Log.
  • Once you start typing in the entry box the send button becomes active. When you are finished keying in your question press the send button.
  • Citizens of Pinellas County have taken to Sustainable Living in many ways. The popularity of Extension programs like Rain Barrel workshops, Composting workshops and a recent Vegetable Gardening workshop has been evident as our auditorium has been filled to capacity.
  • As a county, we have realized that one of the cornerstones of sustainability is saving money, and in these times, saving money is at the forefront of everyone’s mind. This is not to suggest that we are forgetting that making changes in our lifestyles protects our natural resources and the environment as well, but when all is said and done, ask the average person what is most important in their lives (after family), they will tell you in some form or fashion: “Personal Economics.”
  • Now it is time to consider keeping those good habits during the approximately eight hours a day we spend OUTSIDE of our households, and enact the same or similar sustainable behaviors at work that we have embraced at home.
  • Whether you are a laborer, staff, supervisor, director or CEO, saving resources at work has the same or greater impact on our local economy, environment and society as the same practices have at home. It is no longer the feeling that resources at work (ostensibly being paid for by our employer) have any less value to us than those we purchase ourselves. Savings on energy, purchasing, recycling and transportation add up to increase profitability and decrease overhead costs. The company or office that makes a commitment to Green Practices might notice:
  • Whether you are a laborer, staff, supervisor, director or CEO, saving resources at work has the same or greater impact on our local economy, environment and society as the same practices have at home. It is no longer the feeling that resources at work (ostensibly being paid for by our employer) have any less value to us than those we purchase ourselves. Savings on energy, purchasing, recycling and transportation add up to increase profitability and decrease overhead costs. The company or office that makes a commitment to Green Practices might notice:
  • Whether you are a laborer, staff, supervisor, director or CEO, saving resources at work has the same or greater impact on our local economy, environment and society as the same practices have at home. It is no longer the feeling that resources at work (ostensibly being paid for by our employer) have any less value to us than those we purchase ourselves. Savings on energy, purchasing, recycling and transportation add up to increase profitability and decrease overhead costs. The company or office that makes a commitment to Green Practices might notice:
  • Whether you are a laborer, staff, supervisor, director or CEO, saving resources at work has the same or greater impact on our local economy, environment and society as the same practices have at home. It is no longer the feeling that resources at work (ostensibly being paid for by our employer) have any less value to us than those we purchase ourselves. Savings on energy, purchasing, recycling and transportation add up to increase profitability and decrease overhead costs. The company or office that makes a commitment to Green Practices might notice:
  • Energy waste in the workplace can be found in many surprising places. Perhaps the most insidious waste of electricity comes from devices referred to as “peripherals” which are electronic devices other than the PC. Copy machines, battery chargers, desktop printers, and a host of other devices, some specific to an office, often have a “stand-by” mode wherein the device is on and using electricity even when not in use. This “phantom power” can be quite a drain on resources. One desktop printer wastes abut $40 a year if left on overnight (UF). That might not seem like much, but multiply that by a small office of 20 employees ($800), a medium-sized organization of 1000 ($40,000), a governmental agency like Pinellas County, employing 5,000 ($200,000) and finally imagine all the desktop printers in all of our offices throughout our county of 1 million residents, you will start to see the impact.
  • Energy waste in the workplace can be found in many surprising places. Perhaps the most insidious waste of electricity comes from devices referred to as “peripherals” which are electronic devices other than the PC. Copy machines, battery chargers, desktop printers, and a host of other devices, some specific to an office, often have a “stand-by” mode wherein the device is on and using electricity even when not in use. This “phantom power” can be quite a drain on resources. One desktop printer wastes abut $40 a year if left on overnight (UF). That might not seem like much, but multiply that by a small office of 20 employees ($800), a medium-sized organization of 1000 ($40,000), a governmental agency like Pinellas County, employing 5,000 ($200,000) and finally imagine all the desktop printers in all of our offices throughout our county of 1 million residents, you will start to see the impact.
  • Energy waste in the workplace can be found in many surprising places. Perhaps the most insidious waste of electricity comes from devices referred to as “peripherals” which are electronic devices other than the PC. Copy machines, battery chargers, desktop printers, and a host of other devices, some specific to an office, often have a “stand-by” mode wherein the device is on and using electricity even when not in use. This “phantom power” can be quite a drain on resources. One desktop printer wastes abut $40 a year if left on overnight (UF). That might not seem like much, but multiply that by a small office of 20 employees ($800), a medium-sized organization of 1000 ($40,000), a governmental agency like Pinellas County, employing 5,000 ($200,000) and finally imagine all the desktop printers in all of our offices throughout our county of 1 million residents, you will start to see the impact.
  • A solution to this problem is to plug all the peripherals into a “power-strip” which can be shut off at the end of the day. This habit is tantamount to shutting the lights off at the end of each day, and should not prove difficult to enact.
  • A solution to this problem is to plug all the peripherals into a “power-strip” which can be shut off at the end of the day. This habit is tantamount to shutting the lights off at the end of each day, and should not prove difficult to enact.
  • The most conspicuous user of electricity is the PC/monitor itself. These energy-hogs have become the mainstay of office work in the past 20 years. Although they are indispensable, there are ways to make sure they earn their keep. Energy settings, available on most recently-purchased models can reduce consumption by up to $80 per person, per year (UF). The monitor is one of those peripheral devices with a stand-by mode. Make sure it is shut off at the end of the day, and especially on weekends. The monitor often has its own power supply, and can be plugged into a power strip along with other peripherals.
  • The most conspicuous user of electricity is the PC/monitor itself. These energy-hogs have become the mainstay of office work in the past 20 years. Although they are indispensable, there are ways to make sure they earn their keep. Energy settings, available on most recently-purchased models can reduce consumption by up to $80 per person, per year (UF). The monitor is one of those peripheral devices with a stand-by mode. Make sure it is shut off at the end of the day, and especially on weekends. The monitor often has its own power supply, and can be plugged into a power strip along with other peripherals.
  • There are many barriers to asking employees to shut-down their computers each night. There are “urban legends” about harm being done to a PC by turning it off and on regularly. There are various claims by different Information Technology (IT) departments on leaving the PC on 24/7. There are still employees who are too uncomfortable with their PC to do something as drastic as shutting down. To overcome these barriers, it is important as an organization to make a policy on this issue, inform employees on exactly WHY the policy has been enacted, and re-enforce the policy by offering training and updates from your IT provider. A company that truly wants to “go-green” will select an IT provider with sustainable practices in their portfolio. Some IT providers are more concerned with short-term performance than sustainability. Make your choices wisely.
  • Just as at home, the first question is: “is this purchase really necessary?” The second question might be: “Can we find a green alternative?” There have been several articles written on green purchasing on this website (VESTINA) and tips on green purchasing have been offered. The conventional wisdom might indicate that green products are more expensive initially, but recent developments, coupled with advancements in technology and the increase in demand have rendered green office products cheaper and more attractive to the purchasing authority. The same reasons for purchasing green products at the office as at home are at work (pardon the pun) here as well. Non-toxic cleaning products mean less exposure to harmful chemicals. Recycled content means less waste is entering the landfill, and finally, less packaging means less the company has to pay for waste the company has to pay for removal.
  • Just as at home, the first question is: “is this purchase really necessary?” The second question might be: “Can we find a green alternative?” There have been several articles written on green purchasing on this website (VESTINA) and tips on green purchasing have been offered. The conventional wisdom might indicate that green products are more expensive initially, but recent developments, coupled with advancements in technology and the increase in demand have rendered green office products cheaper and more attractive to the purchasing authority. The same reasons for purchasing green products at the office as at home are at work (pardon the pun) here as well. Non-toxic cleaning products mean less exposure to harmful chemicals. Recycled content means less waste is entering the landfill, and finally, less packaging means less the company has to pay for waste the company has to pay for removal.
  • Behind this initial paradigm, some office workers will toss any paper besides white office paper in the trash—they have been told the non-white paper is useless.
  • An employer facing similar barriers may seek the same solution. Whatever option or arrangement is made by a particular employer, it is of utmost importance to inform employees of a change or addition to protocol, and to explain very clearly and repetitiously why this change is important. Reminders, prompts and catchy slogans can help (as proposed by CBSMXXXXXXXXX).
  • During the 20th Century, it became cheaper and/or more convenient to purchase a few automobiles and find one’s own way to work rather than opting for public transport. New communities were so used to this independence that public transport became the exception rather than the norm. Now we find ourselves alone in or cars on the way to work at the same time as all other 9-5ers, and in the midst of the School Run. Time, energy, fuel and the environment all take a hit with this waste during the morning and afternoon commute.
  • There are several responses to this wasteful set-up. One is for employers to examine the possibility of telecommuting. This system allows eligible employees to work from home. Statistics show this arrangement has shown a great increase in job satisfaction, productivity, resource allocation and a reduction (however small) on the carbon emissions of a particular area. Other ways of reducing transportation expenses are: setting-up an employee carpool, providing allowances for employees who choose to arrive to work by bus and, in certain circumstances, evaluating the work fleet to reflect money-saving tips (add link here) on work vehicles.
  • There are several responses to this wasteful set-up. One is for employers to examine the possibility of telecommuting. This system allows eligible employees to work from home. Statistics show this arrangement has shown a great increase in job satisfaction, productivity, resource allocation and a reduction (however small) on the carbon emissions of a particular area. Other ways of reducing transportation expenses are: setting-up an employee carpool, providing allowances for employees who choose to arrive to work by bus and, in certain circumstances, evaluating the work fleet to reflect money-saving tips (add link here) on work vehicles.
  • There are several responses to this wasteful set-up. One is for employers to examine the possibility of telecommuting. This system allows eligible employees to work from home. Statistics show this arrangement has shown a great increase in job satisfaction, productivity, resource allocation and a reduction (however small) on the carbon emissions of a particular area. Other ways of reducing transportation expenses are: setting-up an employee carpool, providing allowances for employees who choose to arrive to work by bus and, in certain circumstances, evaluating the work fleet to reflect money-saving tips (add link here) on work vehicles.
  • There are several responses to this wasteful set-up. One is for employers to examine the possibility of telecommuting. This system allows eligible employees to work from home. Statistics show this arrangement has shown a great increase in job satisfaction, productivity, resource allocation and a reduction (however small) on the carbon emissions of a particular area. Other ways of reducing transportation expenses are: setting-up an employee carpool, providing allowances for employees who choose to arrive to work by bus and, in certain circumstances, evaluating the work fleet to reflect money-saving tips (add link here) on work vehicles.
  • All of the above tips and facts may seem to be common sense to most, but to the average worker, hearing this from an informed, trusted and reputable source may make quite a difference in encouraging employees to join together in helping our community make sustainable decisions while conducting their everyday work tasks. Encourage employees to participate. Illustrate changes and benefits to the company, get employees involved, and listen to employees who may be rich in providing further monetary, environmental and societal benefits to your company.
  • Pinellas County Extension Green Office2

    1. 1. Green Your Office An Introduction to “ Going Green” at Work Wednesday, June 24 th 2009
    2. 2. Welcome!
    3. 3. Welcome! <ul><li>James Stevenson, UF/IFAS Pinellas County Extension Specialist, Urban Sustainability </li></ul>
    4. 5. Making decisions today for the future of our community
    5. 12. Pinellas County’s Journey to Sustainability
    6. 13. Economic Drivers for Behavior Change
    7. 14. Green Your Office
    8. 15. <ul><li>Energy </li></ul>
    9. 16. <ul><li>Purchasing </li></ul>
    10. 17. <ul><li>Waste Reduction and Recycling </li></ul>
    11. 18. What About @ Work?
    12. 19. What are the Benefits?
    13. 20. Lowered Energy Costs
    14. 21. Improved Equipment
    15. 22. Lowered Disposal Costs
    16. 23. What are the Benefits? <ul><li>Improved safety and health of workers in the office. </li></ul>
    17. 24. What are the Benefits? <ul><li>Improved awareness of environmental stewardship in the organization. </li></ul>
    18. 25. What are the Benefits? <ul><li>Conservation of natural resources and energy. </li></ul>
    19. 26. What are the Benefits? <ul><li>New markets for recycled materials and new jobs created. </li></ul>
    20. 27. Anything Else?
    21. 28. <ul><li>Stand apart to consumers looking to support green businesses. </li></ul>
    22. 29. Energy
    23. 30. One desktop printer wastes abut $40 a year if left on overnight.
    24. 31. Energy
    25. 32. Energy
    26. 33. <ul><li>Use a power-strip to plug all peripherals into. </li></ul>
    27. 34. <ul><li>Peripherals include: printers, speakers, portable memory devices, chargers, etc. </li></ul>
    28. 35. What are the Benefits? <ul><li>Install occupancy sensors in suitable rooms. </li></ul>
    29. 36. What are the Benefits? <ul><li>Use Power-Settings on various office machinery. </li></ul>
    30. 37. What are the Benefits? <ul><li>When the time comes, replace office equipment with Energy Star rated items. </li></ul>
    31. 38. The Power-Hog
    32. 39. Energy settings, available on most recently-purchased models can reduce consumption by up to $80 per person, per year.
    33. 40. “But I heard…”
    34. 41. <ul><li>Purchasing </li></ul>
    35. 42. Questions:
    36. 43. What are the Benefits? <ul><li>Is this purchase really necessary? </li></ul>
    37. 44. What are the Benefits? <ul><li>Is there a “green” alternative? </li></ul>
    38. 45. Questions: <ul><li>Can this be rented? </li></ul>
    39. 46. <ul><li>Can this be </li></ul><ul><li>returned? </li></ul>
    40. 47. Questions: <ul><li>Can it be found locally-manufactured? </li></ul>
    41. 48. Products Products
    42. 49. Building & Construction Materials
    43. 50. Products <ul><li>Building and Construction Materials </li></ul><ul><li>Forest Stewardship Council </li></ul>
    44. 51. Products Carpets
    45. 52. Products Making decisions today for the future of our community
    46. 53. Products Cleaning Supplies/Services
    47. 54. Products <ul><li>Cleaning Supplies/Services </li></ul><ul><li>GreenSeal </li></ul>
    48. 55. Products <ul><li>Electronics </li></ul>
    49. 56. Products Electronics
    50. 57. Products <ul><li>Electronics </li></ul><ul><li>EnergyStar </li></ul>
    51. 58. Products <ul><li>Office Supplies and Paper </li></ul>
    52. 59. Products <ul><li>Meetings and Conferences </li></ul>
    53. 60. Waste Reduction and Recycling <ul><li>The average per capita paper use in the USA in 2001 was 700 pounds. </li></ul>
    54. 61. Waste Reduction and Recycling <ul><li>85 Million tons of paper thrown away in 2006 – three- fold increase since 1960. </li></ul>
    55. 62. <ul><li>35% of municipal solid waste is paper and paper products. </li></ul>Making decisions today for the future of our community
    56. 63. <ul><li>EPA reports that recycling causes 35% less water pollution and 74% less air pollution. </li></ul>
    57. 64. <ul><li>40% reduction in energy when paper is recycled vs. paper made with un-recycled pulp. </li></ul>
    58. 65. <ul><li>Every ton of recycled paper saves 380 gallons of oil. </li></ul>
    59. 66. Waste Reduction and Recycling Solutions <ul><li>For any copy projects, always print on both sides of the paper. </li></ul>
    60. 67. <ul><li>Use e-mail for routed copies. </li></ul>Waste Reduc tion and Recyclin g Solutions
    61. 68. Waste Reduction and Recycling Solutions <ul><li>Use the back of waste paper for notes, faxes and draft copies. </li></ul>
    62. 69. Waste Reduction and Recycling Solutions <ul><li>Eliminate junk mail. </li></ul><ul><li>catalogchoice.org </li></ul><ul><li>DMAchoice.org </li></ul>
    63. 70. Barriers
    64. 71. Communication is Key
    65. 72. The Commute
    66. 73. Products The Commute
    67. 74. <ul><li>Telecommuting </li></ul>
    68. 75. Products Carpooling
    69. 76. The Commute: Solutions <ul><li>Public Transport </li></ul>Making decisions today for the future of our community
    70. 77. The Commute: Solutions <ul><li>Cycling </li></ul>Making decisions today for the future of our community Cycling
    71. 78. The Commute: Solutions <ul><li>Cycling </li></ul><ul><li>(Amenities for Staff) </li></ul>Making decisions today for the future of our community
    72. 79. Just the Beginning Making decisions today for the future of our community
    73. 80. Establish a team to guide/promote the program.
    74. 81. <ul><li>Make a commitment. </li></ul>
    75. 82. Starting <ul><li>Create organization-wide guidelines. </li></ul>
    76. 83. Starting <ul><li>Seek support and participation from all levels of the organization. </li></ul>
    77. 84. Tips
    78. 85. Tips <ul><li>Sample Office Checklist </li></ul><ul><li>(pinellascountyextenson.org) </li></ul>
    79. 86. Questions?

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