Weeklong Lesson Plan
                                    Danielle Stucki

Monday:
What:
- Find out what students know abou...
Why:
Today’s reading activity will allow students to see pictures of tornadoes and the
destruction they can cause.
Objecti...
-   Have students write the answers on the board to each question. (Bodily-Kinesthetic-
    G)
- Review the worksheet/answ...
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Weeklong lesson plan

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Weeklong lesson plan

  1. 1. Weeklong Lesson Plan Danielle Stucki Monday: What: - Find out what students know about natural disasters. (Naturalistic- G) - Complete a K-W-L chart to find out what students already know and what they would like to know. Do not fill out the “what students learned part until the lesson is completed. (Communication-SPS) - Discuss the student’s comments. - Read the section on violent weather from the book Weather and Climate by Barbara Taylor. Discuss storms and tornadoes. Ask students if they have a personal story to share. (Intrapersonal- G) - Give the formal definition of a tornado. - Ask students if they can make use of the facts they have been given to draw a picture of a tornado (Application- Bloom). Using markers, crayons, or colored pencils, and construction paper, have students draw a picture of what they think a tornado looks like or what kind of damage it can do to the environment. Have them write a sentence or two describing their drawing. (Visual-Spatial-G) (Science Standard 2.2.5) (Art) Why: Students will begin to understand natural disasters. Objective: By the end of today’s lesson, students will be able to understand what tornadoes are, and have a better understanding of the destruction they can cause. Tuesday: What: - Read the section about Tornado Alley and give the definition from the book Weather and Climate by John Basset. - Learn about the region of Tornado Alley. Use a map to show students exactly where the region is located. Discuss the geography/characteristics of the land of this area. (Visual-Spatial- G) (Social Studies) - Explain to students that there are 5 categories of tornadoes (Fujita Scale). Ask students, how can you classify the types of tornadoes? (Comprehension- Bloom). Discuss and classify tornadoes in each category. (http://www.fema.gov/kids/tornado.htm) (Logical-Mathematical-G) (Classifying-SPS) - Discuss where and how tornadoes happen. - Review: How can you rate the strength of a tornado? (Evaluation- Bloom) - Writing Assignment: Do you know the difference between a tornado warning and a tornado watch? If so, explain. (Intrapersonal-G) - Listen to the song Tornadoes by Ron Brown on the site http://www.songsforteaching.com/intellitunes/tornadoes.htm and have students sing along. (Music) - Have students create a short poem or song about tornadoes. Allow them to be creative and use hands, feet, or other available resources to create music or a beat to go with their poem or song. (Language Arts and Music)
  2. 2. Why: Today’s reading activity will allow students to see pictures of tornadoes and the destruction they can cause. Objective: By the end of today’s lesson, students will know the 5 categories of tornadoes and be able to explain where/what Tornado Alley is and identify the region on a map. Wednesday: What: - View the FEMA for kids website (http://www.fema.gov/kids/tornado.htm) - Learn the terms tornado warning and tornado watch. Have students see if they got the answer to Tuesday’s question correct. - Why do you think we have watches and warnings for tornadoes? (Analysis- Bloom) - Discuss that tornadoes are not always predictable. We do not always know what will happen or how it will effect people and the environment. (Science Standard 2.5.5) - Watch the tornado video clip and discuss what students saw. (Observing and Inferring-SPS) - Read the section be prepared for storms from The Kids Book of Weather Forecasting. Discuss Tornado Safety and visit the “things to know” link on FEMA site. - Computer Lab: Have students explore the FEMA for kid’s website. Have them write down interesting facts that they find. (Intrapersonal- G) - Discuss student’s findings from FEMA for kid’s site. - Ask, what can happen if a tornado occurs? (Synthesis- Bloom) - Assessment: Have students make a plan for emergency weather situations. They may type this on the computer. Have students share their plan with the class. (Interpersonal- G) Why: Students will gain valuable knowledge about what to do if a tornado strikes. Objective: By the end of today’s lessons, students will be able to describe the difference between a tornado warning and a tornado watch. By using technology they will be able to identify facts about tornadoes and tornado safety, and will have developed the knowledge to create an emergency plan. Thursday: What: - Have students write a poem about tornado safety. - Read collecting tornadoes from the book Weatherwatch by Valerie Wyatt. - Have student’s work individually to complete tornado math worksheet (printed from FEMA website)(Math Standard 2.1.6). Allow 20 minutes for completion. (Logical- Mathematical-G)
  3. 3. - Have students write the answers on the board to each question. (Bodily-Kinesthetic- G) - Review the worksheet/answers and discuss how students came to find their answers. Why: Students will develop an understanding that math relates to real world experiences, such as tornadoes. Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to relate math to real life experiences, and understand the importance of knowing how to do math. Friday: What: -Fun Friday Experiment - Daily Math problem: If a tornado is traveling 40 mph how long will it take to travel 5 miles? (Logical-Mathematical-G and Measurement- SPS). Allow students 10 minutes to work on problem before discussing answers and how they got them. Have a student share their answer and how they came up with it. Discuss how long a mile is so that students can visualize how far 5 miles is. (Measurement-SPS) - Have the student’s sit wit you in a circle and construct the tornado in a bottle. Follow steps below: - Before beginning the experiment have students predict what will happen. (Predicting) - Complete the Experiment on page 102 in The Kids Book of Weather Forecasting Have the students watch and then explain what they saw. (Observation and Inferring- SPS) - Discuss that our tornado model is not the same size as a real tornado, and does not do the same things as a real tornado does. (Science Standard 2.6.2) - Can you recall a fact about tornadoes or tornado safety? (Knowledge- Bloom). (Assessment) After the experiment assess students by asking them to each state one fact they learned about tornadoes or tornado safety. (Verbal-Linguistic- G) Why: This type of assessment will allow me to hear what students have learned about tornadoes. Objective: By the end of the week, students will have gained valuable knowledge and understanding of tornadoes and tornado safety

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