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NOUNS COUNTABLE UNCOUNTABLE
COUNTABLE <ul><li>Countable nouns   are for things we can count </li></ul><ul><li>Example:  dog, horse, man, shop, idea. <...
UNCOUNTABLE <ul><li>Uncountable nouns are for the things that we cannot count </li></ul><ul><li>Example:  tea, sugar, wate...
UNCOUNTABLE <ul><li>We cannot use  a/an  with these nouns. To express a quantity of one of these nouns, use a word or expr...
UNCOUNTABLE <ul><li>Some nouns are countable in other languages but uncountable in English. Some of the most common of the...
THE QUANTIFIERS <ul><li>Some  is used in  positive  statements: </li></ul><ul><li>I had  some  rice for lunch  </li></ul><...
SOME <ul><li>Some  is used in situations where the question is not a request for information, but a method of making a req...
ANY <ul><li>Any  is used in questions and with  not  in  negative  statements: </li></ul><ul><li>Have you got  any  tea?  ...
ANY <ul><li>ANY in negative sentences a. She does n't  want  any   kitchen appliances for Christmas. b. They do n't  want ...
ANY <ul><li>ANY in interrogative sentences a. Do you have  any   friends in London? b. Have they got  any   children? c. D...
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Someany

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Someany

  1. 1. NOUNS COUNTABLE UNCOUNTABLE
  2. 2. COUNTABLE <ul><li>Countable nouns are for things we can count </li></ul><ul><li>Example: dog, horse, man, shop, idea. </li></ul><ul><li>They usually have a singular and plural form. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: two dogs, ten horses, a man, six men, the shops, a few ideas. </li></ul>
  3. 3. UNCOUNTABLE <ul><li>Uncountable nouns are for the things that we cannot count </li></ul><ul><li>Example: tea, sugar, water, air, rice. </li></ul><ul><li>They are often the names for abstract ideas or qualities. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: knowledge, beauty, anger, fear, love . </li></ul><ul><li>They are used with a singular verb. They usually do not have a plural form. We cannot say sugars, angers, knowledges . </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of common uncountable nouns : money, furniture, happiness, sadness, research, evidence, safety, beauty, knowledge. </li></ul>
  4. 4. UNCOUNTABLE <ul><li>We cannot use a/an with these nouns. To express a quantity of one of these nouns, use a word or expression like: some, a lot of, a piece of, a bit of, a great deal of... </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>There has been a lot of research into the causes of this disease. </li></ul><ul><li>He gave me a great deal of advice before my interview. </li></ul><ul><li>They've got a lot of furniture . </li></ul><ul><li>Can you give me some information about uncountable nouns? </li></ul><ul><li>Some nouns are countable in other languages but uncountable in English. Some of the most common of these are: </li></ul>
  5. 5. UNCOUNTABLE <ul><li>Some nouns are countable in other languages but uncountable in English. Some of the most common of these are: </li></ul><ul><li>ACCOMMODATION, ADVICE, LUGGAGE, BREAD, INFORMATION, NEWS, TRAVEL, WORK </li></ul><ul><li>BE CAREFUL with the noun 'hair' which is normally uncountable in English: </li></ul><ul><li>She has long blonde hair </li></ul><ul><li>It can also be countable when referring to individual hairs: </li></ul><ul><li>My father's getting a few grey hairs now </li></ul>
  6. 6. THE QUANTIFIERS <ul><li>Some is used in positive statements: </li></ul><ul><li>I had some rice for lunch </li></ul><ul><li>He's got some books from the library. </li></ul><ul><li>It is also used in questions where we are sure about the answer: </li></ul><ul><li>Did he give you some tea? (= I'm sure he did.) </li></ul><ul><li>Is there some fruit juice in the fridge? (= I think there is ) </li></ul>
  7. 7. SOME <ul><li>Some is used in situations where the question is not a request for information, but a method of making a request, encouraging or giving an invitation: </li></ul><ul><li>Could I have some books, please? </li></ul><ul><li>Why don't you take some books home with you? </li></ul><ul><li>Would you like some books? </li></ul>
  8. 8. ANY <ul><li>Any is used in questions and with not in negative statements: </li></ul><ul><li>Have you got any tea? </li></ul><ul><li>He did n't give me any tea. </li></ul><ul><li>I do n't think we've got an y coffee left. </li></ul>
  9. 9. ANY <ul><li>ANY in negative sentences a. She does n't want any kitchen appliances for Christmas. b. They do n't want any help moving to their new house. c. No, thank you. I do n't want any more cake. d. There is n't any reason to complain. </li></ul>
  10. 10. ANY <ul><li>ANY in interrogative sentences a. Do you have any friends in London? b. Have they got any children? c. Do you want any groceries from the shop? d. Are there any problems with your work? </li></ul>

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