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Ready Business<br />Developing a Business Continuity and Disaster Preparedness Plan                   for Your Business<br />
Partners<br />
Introductions<br />Name<br />Kind of Business<br />Past disasters<br />Why you are here<br />
Discussion<br />Why plan?<br />What would be an <br />emergency or disaster<br />to your business?<br />
Why Plan?<br />40-60% of small businesses fail after a major emergency – Small Business Administration<br />Declared disas...
Why Plan?<br />Small to medium-sized businesses often are most susceptible to the long-term effects of an emergency<br />S...
 75% of all net new jobs
 97% of all U.S. exporters</li></ul>Jacinta Quesada/FEMA <br />
Why Plan?<br />Preparedness enhances recovery from:Business disruptionFinancial lossesLoss of market shareDamages to capit...
Indirect Effects<br />Potential losses though business not directly impacted or damaged:Reduced customer baseSupply chain ...
Constraints of Preparedness<br /><ul><li>Often businesses believe they do not have the time, workforce or money
Too much emphasis placed on dramatic, worst-case scenarios</li></ul>FEMA News Photo<br />
Planning Makes Sense<br />October 2005 Ad Council survey:<br /><ul><li>92% said very or somewhat important to prepare for ...
88% said having an emergency plan makes sense
39% said they actually had a plan in place</li></ul>FEMA, Robert Kaufman<br />
Risk Assessment Survey<br />What are the risk levels of various disasters/emergencies        to your business?<br />
Three Steps for Preparedness<br />PLAN to stay in business<br />TALK with your people<br />PROTECT your investment <br />
Plan to Stay in Business<br /><ul><li>Know potential emergencies
Assess how your company functions
Protect your                               employees,                                           your most                 ...
Plan to Stay in Business<br /><ul><li>Provide for evacuation or sheltering in place
Prepare for medical emergencies, encourage first aid and CPR training
Train on fire                        extinguishers</li></ul>FEMA News Photo<br />
Talk to Your People<br />Create an emergency planning team<br />Use drills and exercises<br />Encourage employees to:Get a...
Talk to Your People<br />Detail how you will be in contact with employees, customers and others<br />Plan for people who w...
Protect Your Investment<br />Meet with your insurance provider to understand & review coverage<br />Prepare for utility ou...
Protect Your Investment<br />Secure physical assets<br />Assess your HVAC system<br />Robert A. Eplett/OES CA<br />
Protect Your Investment<br />Protect your data                                      and information                       ...
What are the Costs?<br />No-cost solutions<br />Cost Less Than $500<br />Cost More Than $500<br />NDSU<br />
No-cost Solutions<br />Know what kinds of emergencies might affect your company.<br />Meet insurance provider to review cu...
No-cost Solutions<br />Create an emergency contact list<br />Create a list of critical business contractors<br />Practice ...
No-cost Solutions<br />Decide what to do if your building is unusable<br />Create inventory and equipment lists<br />Plan ...
Costs Less Than $500<br />Buy fire extinguisher and smoke alarms<br />Decide which emergency supplies the company can prov...
Costs Less Than $500<br />Set up a telephone call tree and password-protected Web page to communicate with employees<br />...
Costs Less Than $500<br />Use and update computer anti-virus software and firewalls.<br />Back up records and critical dat...
Costs Less Than $500<br />Attach equipment and cabinets to walls or other stable equipment.<br />Elevate valuable inventor...
Costs More Than $500<br />Consider additional insurance, such as business interruption, flood or earthquake.<br />Install ...
Costs More Than $500<br />Install automatic sprinkler systems, fire hoses and fire-resistant doors and walls.<br />Make su...
Costs More Than $500<br />Upgrade your building’s HVAC system to secure outdoor air intakes and increase filter efficiency...
Costs More Than $500<br />Send safety and key emergency response employees to trainings or conferences.<br />Provide a lar...
Discussion<br />What are other types of no-cost or low-cost solutions?<br />What are the resources in your community that ...
Make a Plan<br />Ready Business provides  a sample emergency plan and worksheets to guide you through developing the basic...
Plan to Stay in Business<br />Secure primary location<br />Secure alternate location<br />Select crisis manager plus backu...
Plan to Stay in Business<br />Create emergency contact list and procedures<br />List most likely disasters<br />
Develop a Team<br /><ul><li>Determine who will participate in emergency planning and crisis management
Include representation from all staff
Coordinate with neighbors and building management</li></ul>Michael Raphael/FEMA<br />
Inventory Critical Operations<br /><ul><li>List prioritized critical operations, staff in charge and procedures for each</...
 Contact Name
 Account Number
 Street address
 City, State, Zip Code
 Phone, Fax, E-Mail
 Materials/Service                       Provided</li></ul>FEMA News Photo<br />
Evacuation Plan<br />Establish what employees should do if they need to leave the workplace quickly<br /><ul><li>Is there ...
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Ready Business

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Ready Business walks small-business owners and managers through the process of developing a business continuity and disaster preparedness plan for their businesses.

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Ready Business

  1. 1.
  2. 2. Ready Business<br />Developing a Business Continuity and Disaster Preparedness Plan for Your Business<br />
  3. 3. Partners<br />
  4. 4. Introductions<br />Name<br />Kind of Business<br />Past disasters<br />Why you are here<br />
  5. 5. Discussion<br />Why plan?<br />What would be an <br />emergency or disaster<br />to your business?<br />
  6. 6. Why Plan?<br />40-60% of small businesses fail after a major emergency – Small Business Administration<br />Declared disasters more than doubled in recent years<br />John Arens<br />
  7. 7. Why Plan?<br />Small to medium-sized businesses often are most susceptible to the long-term effects of an emergency<br />Small businesses are a vital part of the U.S. economy:<br /><ul><li> 99% of all employers
  8. 8. 75% of all net new jobs
  9. 9. 97% of all U.S. exporters</li></ul>Jacinta Quesada/FEMA <br />
  10. 10. Why Plan?<br />Preparedness enhances recovery from:Business disruptionFinancial lossesLoss of market shareDamages to capital assets, equipment or inventory<br />Preparedness bolsters:Business’ securityCredibility with customers, vendors, supply chain and the community<br />NDSU<br />
  11. 11. Indirect Effects<br />Potential losses though business not directly impacted or damaged:Reduced customer baseSupply chain unable to get materials to you Distributors or vendors unable to dispense<br />FEMA/Liz Roll<br />
  12. 12. Constraints of Preparedness<br /><ul><li>Often businesses believe they do not have the time, workforce or money
  13. 13. Too much emphasis placed on dramatic, worst-case scenarios</li></ul>FEMA News Photo<br />
  14. 14. Planning Makes Sense<br />October 2005 Ad Council survey:<br /><ul><li>92% said very or somewhat important to prepare for an emergency
  15. 15. 88% said having an emergency plan makes sense
  16. 16. 39% said they actually had a plan in place</li></ul>FEMA, Robert Kaufman<br />
  17. 17. Risk Assessment Survey<br />What are the risk levels of various disasters/emergencies to your business?<br />
  18. 18. Three Steps for Preparedness<br />PLAN to stay in business<br />TALK with your people<br />PROTECT your investment <br />
  19. 19. Plan to Stay in Business<br /><ul><li>Know potential emergencies
  20. 20. Assess how your company functions
  21. 21. Protect your employees, your most important assets</li></ul>NDSU<br />
  22. 22. Plan to Stay in Business<br /><ul><li>Provide for evacuation or sheltering in place
  23. 23. Prepare for medical emergencies, encourage first aid and CPR training
  24. 24. Train on fire extinguishers</li></ul>FEMA News Photo<br />
  25. 25. Talk to Your People<br />Create an emergency planning team<br />Use drills and exercises<br />Encourage employees to:Get an emergency supply kitMake a family emergency planBe informed of potential emergencies<br />NDSU<br />
  26. 26. Talk to Your People<br />Detail how you will be in contact with employees, customers and others<br />Plan for people who will require special assistance<br />Understand that people may have special recovery needs<br />FEMA, Rob Melendez<br />
  27. 27. Protect Your Investment<br />Meet with your insurance provider to understand & review coverage<br />Prepare for utility outages and disruptions <br />Patsy Lynch/FEMA<br />
  28. 28. Protect Your Investment<br />Secure physical assets<br />Assess your HVAC system<br />Robert A. Eplett/OES CA<br />
  29. 29. Protect Your Investment<br />Protect your data and information technology systems<br />NDSU<br />
  30. 30. What are the Costs?<br />No-cost solutions<br />Cost Less Than $500<br />Cost More Than $500<br />NDSU<br />
  31. 31. No-cost Solutions<br />Know what kinds of emergencies might affect your company.<br />Meet insurance provider to review current coverage.<br />Create evacuation and shelter-in-place plans, and practice them.<br />FEMA News Photo<br />
  32. 32. No-cost Solutions<br />Create an emergency contact list<br />Create a list of critical business contractors<br />Practice your emergency plan frequently<br />Talk with your staff about the company’s disaster plans<br />FEMA<br />
  33. 33. No-cost Solutions<br />Decide what to do if your building is unusable<br />Create inventory and equipment lists<br />Plan for utility service alternatives<br />Promote individual and family preparedness<br />FEMA Are You Ready?<br />
  34. 34. Costs Less Than $500<br />Buy fire extinguisher and smoke alarms<br />Decide which emergency supplies the company can provide<br />Encourage individuals to keep a workplace emergency kit<br />FEMA<br />
  35. 35. Costs Less Than $500<br />Set up a telephone call tree and password-protected Web page to communicate with employees<br />Provide employees with first aid and CPR training<br />FEMA<br />
  36. 36. Costs Less Than $500<br />Use and update computer anti-virus software and firewalls.<br />Back up records and critical data. Keep a copy offsite.<br />FEMA, Jocelyn Augustino<br />
  37. 37. Costs Less Than $500<br />Attach equipment and cabinets to walls or other stable equipment.<br />Elevate valuable inventory and electric machinery off the floor.<br />
  38. 38. Costs More Than $500<br />Consider additional insurance, such as business interruption, flood or earthquake.<br />Install a generator and provide for other utility alternatives and back-up options.<br />FEMA/Melissa Ann Janssen<br />
  39. 39. Costs More Than $500<br />Install automatic sprinkler systems, fire hoses and fire-resistant doors and walls.<br />Make sure your building meets standards and codes. Consider a professional engineer to evaluate wind, fire or seismic resistance.<br />
  40. 40. Costs More Than $500<br />Upgrade your building’s HVAC system to secure outdoor air intakes and increase filter efficiency.<br />Consider a security professional to evaluate your emergency plan.<br />
  41. 41. Costs More Than $500<br />Send safety and key emergency response employees to trainings or conferences.<br />Provide a large group of employees with first aid, CPR and CERT training.<br />FEMA/Jocelyn Augustino<br />
  42. 42. Discussion<br />What are other types of no-cost or low-cost solutions?<br />What are the resources in your community that can provide or enhance emergency planning? <br />
  43. 43. Make a Plan<br />Ready Business provides a sample emergency plan and worksheets to guide you through developing the basic framework of an emergency plan; EDEN provides an MS Word template.<br />Businesses differ in size, scope and situation; so will emergency plans.<br />
  44. 44. Plan to Stay in Business<br />Secure primary location<br />Secure alternate location<br />Select crisis manager plus backups<br />Select spokesperson plus backups<br />
  45. 45. Plan to Stay in Business<br />Create emergency contact list and procedures<br />List most likely disasters<br />
  46. 46. Develop a Team<br /><ul><li>Determine who will participate in emergency planning and crisis management
  47. 47. Include representation from all staff
  48. 48. Coordinate with neighbors and building management</li></ul>Michael Raphael/FEMA<br />
  49. 49. Inventory Critical Operations<br /><ul><li>List prioritized critical operations, staff in charge and procedures for each</li></li></ul><li>Suppliers, Contractors, Vendors<br />For primary and secondary suppliers, contractors and vendors, list:<br /><ul><li> Company Name
  50. 50. Contact Name
  51. 51. Account Number
  52. 52. Street address
  53. 53. City, State, Zip Code
  54. 54. Phone, Fax, E-Mail
  55. 55. Materials/Service Provided</li></ul>FEMA News Photo<br />
  56. 56. Evacuation Plan<br />Establish what employees should do if they need to leave the workplace quickly<br /><ul><li>Is there a warning system?
  57. 57. Where is the assembly site?
  58. 58. Who will shut down the business?
  59. 59. Who will issue the all clear to return to work?</li></ul>Cynthia Hunter/FEMA<br />
  60. 60. Evacuation Plan<br />Collaborate with neighboring businesses & building owners<br />Post evacuation routes in clear view of workplace<br /><ul><li>Ensure building exits are clearly marked
  61. 61. Exercise the plan, practice evacuation procedures several times a year</li></li></ul><li>Shelter-in-Place Plan<br />Establish shelter-in-place procedure to include:<br /><ul><li>Warning system
  62. 62. Shelter-in-place location
  63. 63. Seal-the-room location
  64. 64. Who shuts down the business
  65. 65. Who issues the all clear to return to work</li></li></ul><li>Shelter-in-Place Plan<br />Exercise sheltering in place several times a year<br />Tell employees which supplies the company will provide in the shelter <br />Encourage employees to have workplace emergency supply kits<br />
  66. 66. Emergency Supply Kit<br /><ul><li>Water
  67. 67. Food
  68. 68. Battery-powered radio and extra batteries
  69. 69. Flashlight and extra batteries
  70. 70. First aid kit
  71. 71. Whistle to signal for help</li></ul>NDSU<br />
  72. 72. Emergency Supply Kit<br /><ul><li>Dust or filter masks
  73. 73. Moist towelettes for sanitation
  74. 74. Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  75. 75. Can opener for food
  76. 76. Plastic sheeting and duct tape to seal
  77. 77. Garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation</li></li></ul><li>Employee Communications<br />Who will communicate emergency plans to employees? How?<br />In a disaster, how will you communicate with employees?<br />Create a list of emergency numbers for all employees<br />Encourage family communication plans<br />
  78. 78. Cybersecurity<br />What are the steps you are taking to protect your computer hardware?<br />What are the steps you are taking to protect your computer software?<br />
  79. 79. Records Back-up<br />Who is responsible for backing up critical records, including payroll and accounting systems?<br />Are back-up records, site maps, insurance policies, bank account records and other essential information stored onsite and offsite?<br />
  80. 80. Computer Inventory<br />Know the computer hardware you own or lease<br />Know the capacity of your IT system <br />Document the model, serial number, date purchase and cost for insurance records<br />
  81. 81. Insurance Coverage<br />Review types of insurance, coverage, deductibles, policy limits<br />Record policy numbers<br />Are there measures or additional insurance required to keep you open for business in the event of an emergency?<br />
  82. 82. Annual Review<br />Mark a date each year to review and update your plan .<br />Exercise the plan several times a year.<br />Incorporate key messages in new employee orientation.<br />Encourage employees to prepare themselves & their families by getting a home emergency supply kit, creating a family emergency plan and staying informed.<br />
  83. 83. Resources for Employers<br />Ready BusinessDownload at www.ready.govOrder from 1-800-BE-READY<br />Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN)Download at www.EDEN.lsu.edu<br />
  84. 84. Resources for Employees<br />Ready AmericaResources to encourage employees and their families to preparewww.ready.gov800-BE-READY<br />
  85. 85. Get Prepared and Involved <br />Share your plan and procedures with employees, customers and others; encourage them to prepare<br />Spread the word among your industry, vendors, supply chain, professional associations and customers<br />Become a National Preparedness Month Coalition member<br />
  86. 86. Partners<br />
  87. 87. Evaluation<br />www.surveymonkey.com/s/TSVKMCS<br />

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