Si S Waste Heat And Distributed Energy White 2007

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Scientists in Schools - Presentation from the Energy and Climate Change Symposium

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Si S Waste Heat And Distributed Energy White 2007

  1. 1. Waste Heat & Distributed Energy Stephen White Waste Heat Stream Leader 7 th February, 2007
  2. 2. Today's “centralised” electricity system Large distant power plants supply almost all customers. In Australia the average efficiency is 33.1% Transmission losses Effective energy utilisation ~ 28.5% Distribution losses
  3. 3. “ Distributed” generation avoids 50% of your bill (IPART, 1999) Retailer 10% Wholesale 40% Transmission 10% Distribution 40%
  4. 4. New distributed power generators 0.5 – 3 kW 5 – 50 kW 30 – 500 kW 5kW – 5MW 30kW – 2MW up to 3 kW Typical Size 10-25% Stirling/ Rankine engines 35-55% Fuel cells 20-35% Microturbine 25-40% Reciprocating engines Renewable Wind turbine Renewable Solar photovoltaic/ thermal Efficiency Type
  5. 5. Heat from distributed generation is useful
  6. 6. But gas is expensive too - Waste heat is a necessary extra revenue stream Average domestic house (4500kWh) Generator electrical efficiency = 30% Assumed 100% waste heat utilisation South Australia Victoria New South Wales
  7. 7. Waste heat research <ul><li>Science </li></ul><ul><li>Nanoscale materials </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Catalysts, structures, interfaces </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Materials fabrication </li></ul><ul><li>Thermal design </li></ul><ul><li>Application </li></ul><ul><li>Heat transport/ transfer </li></ul><ul><li>Heat conversion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cooling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Electricity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Desalination </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Industrial processes </li></ul>
  8. 8. Hornsby trigeneration <ul><li>Project Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Large reduction in CO 2 emissions at a single site </li></ul><ul><li>Showcase energy efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Location </li></ul><ul><li>Hornsby City Library, Sydney </li></ul><ul><li>Method </li></ul><ul><li>Trigeneration (power and cooling) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Microturbine </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Desiccant cooling </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Tri-generation schematic
  10. 10. Trigeneration system during construction
  11. 11. Desiccant system model validation Enthalpy removed from the fresh supply air stream Simulated Measured
  12. 12. Organic Rankine cycle
  13. 13. ORC fluid motor options <ul><li>New Rotary Expander </li></ul><ul><li>Patented technology development </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Simplicity/ robustness/ cost </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Efficiency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexibility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>High capacity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Rotary Scroll </li></ul><ul><li>Immediate availability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Semi hermetic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low noise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oil free ? </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Thermoelectric power generation - The ZT challenge
  15. 15. Progress in the challenge
  16. 16. What could the future look like ?
  17. 17. Thank You Energy Technology Distributed Energy Name Stephen White Title Waste Heat Stream Leader Phone +61 2 4960 6070 Email [email_address] Web www.csiro.au Contact CSIRO Phone 1300 363 400 +61 3 9545 2176 Email [email_address] Web www.csiro.au

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