EPD 355 INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN FOR ONLINE COURSE DEVELOPMENT MARCH 2, 2008 DALLAS DUNLOP Reflective Pedagogy Presentation
INDEX <ul><li>What is Instructional design? </li></ul><ul><li>My instructional design </li></ul><ul><li>My Needs Analysis ...
What is Instructional Design? <ul><li>Instructional Design: </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional Design is the systematic devel...
My instructional design <ul><li>During this class I feel that the instructional design model which most closely matches th...
My Needs Analysis  <ul><li>In my experience as a classroom teacher, I have found the first and most important part of a so...
Identify Instructional Goals and Analyze Tasks <ul><li>Instructional goals in my class are based on several questions. Wha...
What Assessment? <ul><li>When I have collected the student data and I have visited with them to observe their learning and...
Teaching Strategies and Instructional Media <ul><li>Teaching strategies and instructional media are used in conjunction. M...
Lets Teach! <ul><li>The teaching aspect of my job has changed over the past ten years. Now that I have one student to teac...
How did it go? <ul><li>I must remember to evaluate my instruction and if possible ask another teacher or administrator for...
Bibliography <ul><li>Ganey, L. R., Christ, F. L., & and Hurt, V. R. (2006). Retrieved February 28, 2008, from  Online Stud...
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Dallas Dunlop Reflective Pedagogy Presentation

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Dallas Dunlop Reflective Pedagogy Presentation

  1. 1. EPD 355 INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN FOR ONLINE COURSE DEVELOPMENT MARCH 2, 2008 DALLAS DUNLOP Reflective Pedagogy Presentation
  2. 2. INDEX <ul><li>What is Instructional design? </li></ul><ul><li>My instructional design </li></ul><ul><li>My Needs Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Identify Instructional Goals and Analyze Tasks </li></ul><ul><li>What Assessment? </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching Strategies and Instructional Media </li></ul><ul><li>Lets Teach! </li></ul><ul><li>How did it go? </li></ul><ul><li>Bibliography </li></ul>
  3. 3. What is Instructional Design? <ul><li>Instructional Design: </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional Design is the systematic development of instructional specifications using learning and instructional theory to ensure the quality of instruction. It is the entire process of analysis of learning needs and goals and the development of a delivery system to meet those needs. It includes development of instructional materials and activities; and tryout and evaluation of all instruction and learner activities. </li></ul>
  4. 4. My instructional design <ul><li>During this class I feel that the instructional design model which most closely matches that way I prepare my lessons is the five phases for the eClassroom. These steps to a successful design are based on a behaviorist theory. The five steps are listed below. </li></ul><ul><li>Perform a Needs Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Identify Instructional Goals and Analyze Tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Write the Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Choose Teaching Strategies and Instructional Media </li></ul><ul><li>Teach the Course </li></ul>
  5. 5. My Needs Analysis <ul><li>In my experience as a classroom teacher, I have found the first and most important part of a solid instructional year is to know my audience. I must prepare lessons that meet the requirements of not only the CEF (curriculum essentials framework ) and the state benchmarks, but also the learning styles of each of my students. I have to consider that I will be facilitating eight grade levels of students in all subject areas. My curriculum will have to be flexible without being broken. </li></ul><ul><li>In my experience as a teacher at Odyssey, the first few days are very important in establishing a good foundation. Orientation week with my students allows me to mentally begin formulating my curriculum. I will have basic information on each student and these first face-to-face meetings will tell me more about the new families. </li></ul><ul><li>During this analysis phase I am able to give my “demands” of the class. What is required by me as the teacher? What is required as a student and parent in this program? This orientation week revolves around the families questions and answers. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Identify Instructional Goals and Analyze Tasks <ul><li>Instructional goals in my class are based on several questions. What are the tasks involved in my course? How many skills are needed to achieve the goals? To answer these I first need to know where my students are academically. Students are given a series of short baseline tests to show grade level. These tests are later given again, face-to-face, to check consistency. This testing data allows me to benchmark each student individually. I can then develop lessons for students that match their individual needs. For example if a 7 th grader needs some extra help in fractions I can isolate that focus in their weekly math assignments. This helps the student to concentrate on that area until mastered, while not stopping an entire class. This can also be adapted for a higher level student who is board with the work or who learns at a faster pace. </li></ul>
  7. 7. What Assessment? <ul><li>When I have collected the student data and I have visited with them to observe their learning and living environments, I can then develop assessments. The best thing about my school is most of this assessment creation is done for me. I use several programs that have been developed with pre-tests, lesson quizzes and unit tests. It gives me accurate lesson data every week. These programs are used from first grade through seventh and cover all subjects. This information is used to make changes in lessons and future assessments. Personally I find this way of assessment very successful. Students and parents can access this data after every lesson and there are no questions about the weekly performance. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Teaching Strategies and Instructional Media <ul><li>Teaching strategies and instructional media are used in conjunction. My teaching strategies are different for every student. I spend 60 minutes with them every week, and develop mini-lessons according to the lesson data from the previous week. When I notice that a student did poorly in a specific area or concept, I will bring other media we can work on together to develop that missed concept. </li></ul><ul><li>The online media used in my school consists of learner-centered programs and engaging interactive lessons. This type media evolves with the students. An example of this is a program called Compass Learning. The lower grade levels have a character that directs them throughout each lesson. For example in 1 st grade it is a talking animal. This character is changed at each level to be age appropriate for the specific grade. Students tend to be more engaged with the lessons when the character is “cool”. These programs can also be paused and rewound unlike a regular classroom lesson. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Lets Teach! <ul><li>The teaching aspect of my job has changed over the past ten years. Now that I have one student to teach at any time, I can focus one hundred percent on the individual. During these visits I like to use as many of the nine Events of Instruction (Gagne, Briggs, and Wager, 1992) the nine are as follows : </li></ul><ul><li>Gaining Attention </li></ul><ul><li>Informing the learner of the objective(s) </li></ul><ul><li>Stimulate recall of prior learning </li></ul><ul><li>Present the new material and </li></ul><ul><li>Provide learning guidance </li></ul><ul><li>Elicit performance </li></ul><ul><li>Provide feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Assess performance </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance retention and transfer </li></ul><ul><li>This list is very helpful when thinking about a students needs. Many of my students are working above grade level and I like to spend several minutes stimulating recall from them. I have found that is technique demands a higher level of thinking. </li></ul>
  10. 10. How did it go? <ul><li>I must remember to evaluate my instruction and if possible ask another teacher or administrator for advise. I must ask questions that relate to my lessons effectiveness and usability. I don’t have much chance to test my lessons out on a “test” group, which makes it that much more important that I get the feedback from my peers and supervisors. </li></ul><ul><li>I have learnt that systematic design is constantly changing. The theories behind instructional designed lessons are just as diverse and the students that we design them for. I also see that I have been using these theories for years. Although I did not know the “buzz words” for ID I can clearly see where they are part of my lesson design. I only hope to develop them more and fully utilize these concepts and teaching methodologys into all of my lessons. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Bibliography <ul><li>Ganey, L. R., Christ, F. L., & and Hurt, V. R. (2006). Retrieved February 28, 2008, from Online Student Skills and Strategies Handbook. New York: Person/Longman. </li></ul><ul><li>Hagar.up.ac.za . (1997, August). Retrieved February 28, 2008, from What is Instructional Design Theory?: http://hagar.up.ac.za/catts/learner/peterdl/ID%20Theory.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Simonson, M. R. (2007). The guide to Distance Learning. Chicago: Pearson . </li></ul><ul><li>Webmaster. (2006, January 1). The Correspondence School . Retrieved February 28, 2008, from , from The Correspondence School: http://www.correspondence.school.nz/ </li></ul><ul><li>Wikipedia . (2008). Retrieved from wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki </li></ul><ul><li>www.ic.arizona.edu . (1996, May 1). Retrieved February 28, 2008, from Instructional Design Theory: http://www.ic.arizona.edu/ic/edp511/isd1.html </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>

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