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Writing Correctly<br />A miniature guide to huge success<br />
Focus on<br />Punctuation – easiest area for errors<br />Jargon – use proper language <br />Being concise – express a lot ...
Punctuation<br />Apostrophe rule 1<br />Use the apostrophe with contractions. The apostrophe is always placed at the spot ...
Punctuation<br />Apostrophe rule 2<br />Use the apostrophe to show possession. Place the apostrophe before the s to show s...
Punctuation<br />Apostrophe rule 3<br />To show plural possession, make the noun plural first. Then immediately use the ap...
Punctuation<br />Apostrophe rule 4<br />Use the apostrophe and s after the second name only if two people possess the same...
Jargon<br />Jargon – specialized or technical language used within a particular group, organization, or field (2).<br />Us...
Jargon<br />Simple rules to follow when using jargon.<br />Use only when certain that audience will understand it<br />Use...
Be concise<br />Main objective is to express information in as little words as possible (2).<br />Avoid unnecessary modifi...
Be concise<br />Avoid dummy subjects<br />No: It is the decision of the board that the project be terminated.<br />Yes: Th...
Be concise<br />Avoid nominalizations<br />No: The role of the project manager is the supervision of    employees.<br />	Y...
Make it clear<br />Ensures document is not ambiguous (2).<br />Use pronouns clearly<br />No: The engineers provided models...
Make it clear<br />Clarify ambiguous statements<br />No: Architects require more exact measurements than plumbers.<br />Ye...
References<br />1) "Apostrophes | Punctuation Rules." Grammar andPunctuation | The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation. W...
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Blog 1 Ppt

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Blog 1 Ppt

  1. 1. Writing Correctly<br />A miniature guide to huge success<br />
  2. 2. Focus on<br />Punctuation – easiest area for errors<br />Jargon – use proper language <br />Being concise – express a lot through a little <br />Making it clear – abandon ambiguity <br />
  3. 3. Punctuation<br />Apostrophe rule 1<br />Use the apostrophe with contractions. The apostrophe is always placed at the spot where the letter(s) has been removed (1). <br />Examples:<br />isn't <br />You're right.<br />She's a great teacher.<br />
  4. 4. Punctuation<br />Apostrophe rule 2<br />Use the apostrophe to show possession. Place the apostrophe before the s to show singular possession (1). <br />Examples:<br />one boy's hat<br />one woman's hat<br />one actress's hat <br />
  5. 5. Punctuation<br />Apostrophe rule 3<br />To show plural possession, make the noun plural first. Then immediately use the apostrophe (1). <br />Examples:<br />the Changs' house<br />the Joneses' golf clubs<br />the Strauses' daughter<br />
  6. 6. Punctuation<br />Apostrophe rule 4<br />Use the apostrophe and s after the second name only if two people possess the same item (1). <br />Examples:<br />Cesar and Maribel's home is constructed of redwood.<br />Cesar's and Maribel's job contracts will be renewed next year.<br />Cesar and Maribel's job contracts will be renewed next year.<br />
  7. 7. Jargon<br />Jargon – specialized or technical language used within a particular group, organization, or field (2).<br />Useful when all know language<br />Confusion and frustration if unfamiliar<br />
  8. 8. Jargon<br />Simple rules to follow when using jargon.<br />Use only when certain that audience will understand it<br />Use sparingly to convey expertise and gain audience confidence<br />Define jargon terms for audiences<br />Never use to mask information or to confuse audience (2)<br />
  9. 9. Be concise<br />Main objective is to express information in as little words as possible (2).<br />Avoid unnecessary modifiers<br />No: The report doesn’t require any particular deadline.<br />Yes: The report doesn’t require a deadline. <br />Reduce descriptive clauses<br /> No: The reaction, which was recently identified, was<br /> not the only catalyst.<br /> Yes: The recently identified action was not the only catalyst.<br />
  10. 10. Be concise<br />Avoid dummy subjects<br />No: It is the decision of the board that the project be terminated.<br />Yes: The board decided to terminate the project.<br />Avoid strings of prepositional phrases<br />No: The condition of the patient was documented in the patient profile written by the nurse on duty during the after-hours shift.<br />Yes: The after-hours nurse documented the patient’s condition in the patient profile.<br />
  11. 11. Be concise<br />Avoid nominalizations<br />No: The role of the project manager is the supervision of employees.<br /> Yes: The project manager supervises employees.<br />Avoid excessive information <br />No: In response to your query of February 28, 2007, our primary microscopes do have digital imaging capabilities.<br />Yes: Our primary microscopes do have digital imaging capabilities. <br />
  12. 12. Make it clear<br />Ensures document is not ambiguous (2).<br />Use pronouns clearly<br />No: The engineers provided models as long as they were available.<br />Yes: The engineers provided models as long as the models were available<br />Use modifiers clearly<br />No: The lab equipment was returned to the factory where it had been developed three years earlier by parcel post.<br />Yes: The lab equipment was returned by parcel post to the factory where it had been developed three years earlier.<br />
  13. 13. Make it clear<br />Clarify ambiguous statements<br />No: Architects require more exact measurements than plumbers.<br />Yes: Architects require more exact measurements than plumbers do. <br />Order words thoughtfully<br />No: Over the budget looked the IT supervisor.<br />Yes: The IT supervisor looked over the budget.<br />
  14. 14. References<br />1) "Apostrophes | Punctuation Rules." Grammar andPunctuation | The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation. Web. 25 Mar. 2010. http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/apostro.asp.<br />2) Dorbin, Sidney, Christopher Keller, and Christian Weisser. Technical Communication in the Twenty-First Century. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall. Print.<br />

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