Eryn Travis-Podcasting and Blogging

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Eryn Travis-Podcasting and Blogging

  1. 1. Blogging and Podcasting in Education By:Eryn Travis
  2. 2. Blogging:Elementary Classrooms <ul><li>A blog is a webpage that is available for comments by the readers in response to the blog owner’s post(s). </li></ul><ul><li>There are four types of blogs found in the Elementary Classroom </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Classroom News Blog </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mirror Blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Showcase Blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Literature Response Blogs </li></ul></ul>Zawilinski, Lisa. (May 2009). HOT Blogging: A Framework for Blogging to Promote Higher Order Thinking. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, No. 8, pp. 650-661. Internationl Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20486620
  3. 3. Classroom News Blogs <ul><li>This type is used to share news and information between the teachers, the students, and their parents. </li></ul><ul><li>Many times the teachers will update the blogs daily with homework assignments, news in the classroom like field trips and visitors, and any other information that is beneficial to the parents with their students. </li></ul>Zawilinski, Lisa. (May 2009). HOT Blogging: A Framework for Blogging to Promote Higher Order Thinking. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, No. 8, pp. 650-661. Internationl Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20486620
  4. 4. Mirror Blogs <ul><li>This type allows the reflection on the bloggers’ thoughts. </li></ul><ul><li>An example: A teacher my attend a workshop or a seminar and share his or her thoughts on the blog and have her students respond and other teachers as well. </li></ul><ul><li>Also, teachers will post a quote they liked in a book or article and write a reflection on why he or she had chose that quote and have the students reflect on it as well. </li></ul>Zawilinski, Lisa. (May 2009). HOT Blogging: A Framework for Blogging to Promote Higher Order Thinking. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, No. 8, pp. 650-661. Internationl Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20486620
  5. 5. Showcase Blogs <ul><li>This kind of blog is used by teachers that will post students’ artwork, projects, podcasts, and written works. </li></ul><ul><li>Second language learners use this to write responses, to those kinds of work, in their second language(s). </li></ul>Zawilinski, Lisa. (May 2009). HOT Blogging: A Framework for Blogging to Promote Higher Order Thinking. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, No. 8, pp. 650-661. Internationl Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20486620
  6. 6. Literature Response Blogs <ul><li>This kind of blog is where the teacher will post an idea or prompt and have the students respond from a text they are reading in class. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes a teacher will have the students work in groups and have them respond as one. This will require the students to work together and find what is important to post in the response. </li></ul>Zawilinski, Lisa. (May 2009). HOT Blogging: A Framework for Blogging to Promote Higher Order Thinking. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, No. 8, pp. 650-661. Internationl Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20486620
  7. 7. “ Why should educators take the time to blog? <ul><li>Ms. Kruel’s response: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I think the biggest advantage to blogs is that they provide an authentic audience for student writing and work in general. In the past the teacher was usually the only person who read student work. With a blog, student work can be read by classmates, parents, extended family members, school community members, project partners, classroom teachers, pre-service teachers, and anyone around the world who locates the class blog.”(“HOT…” page 652) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I loved her response to the question because I feel it is important for educators to hop on board with incorporating up to date technology in the classroom. One, this will help the communication between everyone inside and outside the classroom. Two, it is helping the students be more comfortable with doing classroom work with the “outside” recreational technology. This article also taught me how the use of technology will help build that bridge to inside work to outside work. Also, I learned that when it comes to blogging, the educator will receive more thoughtful responses when you have a blog that students are free to post their own ideas and works of art. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Blogs and Internet Projects <ul><li>Many teachers are using blogs and internet access to aid students in literature and creative writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Ms. Collum’s 5th grade class </li></ul><ul><li>Mr. Hodgson’s blog and podcast </li></ul><ul><li>Many ideas are taught through these kinds of projects such as </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying problems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Locating online resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critically evaluating information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning to share ideas with one another </li></ul></ul>Boling, Erica. (March 2008). Technology in Literacy Education: Collaborative Literacy: Blogs and Internet Projects. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 504-506. International Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20204621
  9. 9. Ms. Collum’s 5th Graders <ul><li>She had her students read a novel of their choice from a selected group </li></ul><ul><li>They then responded by writing a poem. She had them edit their poems by using Google Docs </li></ul><ul><li>They then would audiotape their reading of their poems. </li></ul><ul><li>She sent them to Mr. Hodgson, where he would post them on his Youth Radio blog. </li></ul>Boling, Erica. (March 2008). Technology in Literacy Education: Collaborative Literacy: Blogs and Internet Projects. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 504-506. International Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20204621
  10. 10. Mr. Hodgson’s Youth Radio <ul><li>He created this for “young writers and voices can connect with news stories about their communities, their schools, and their interests.” </li></ul><ul><li>For one of his classes, he had his students to take a photograph of a beautiful snowy Massachusetts day and post it while the other students write and record audio for the pictures. The students then blogged with students in the Philippines. </li></ul>Boling, Erica. (March 2008). Technology in Literacy Education: Collaborative Literacy: Blogs and Internet Projects. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 504-506. International Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20204621
  11. 11. Teachers as Moderators <ul><li>“ When teachers act as moderators and create blogs such as The Adventures of Jefferson Bear and Youth Radio, they provide students with opportunities to connect safely with real audiences while learning about different communities and cultures.” (Technology…”page 505) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I am a “teacher in training” and will be dual licensed in ESL and I believe that blogging will help in such a way that every student can experience ideas and adventures that would not normally cross their minds. The idea of blogging with another classroom in another country (or even another state) never really crossed my mind until I read this article. I remember having pen pals in elementary school ranging from Alabama to Paris, France. I think it is great way for the students the communicate with those of other backgrounds :) </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. “ Proof-Revising”-Podcasting <ul><li>Proofreading for elementary students involve just quick glances over their story. </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasting allows the students to communicate with a “real” audience. </li></ul><ul><li>This is where a student or teacher can audio-tape and post it on a website for students or other teachers to respond or “blog” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Proof-Revising”-allows the student to hear how their writing is percieved. </li></ul>Davis, Anne. (March 2009). “Proof-Revising” with Podcasting: Keeping Readers in Mind as Students Listen to and Rethink Their Writing. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, no. 6, pp. 522-529. International Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20464458
  13. 13. Proof-revising <ul><li>This allows the students to hear and see their work. </li></ul><ul><li>The teacher acts as the reader and records as he or she reads. </li></ul><ul><li>This helps the students understand where and when their writing is understood by the reader. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The goal is to make students willing to rethink and revise their writing to make it not only clear and precise but also engaging for readers.” (“Proof…” page 522) </li></ul>Davis, Anne. (March 2009). “Proof-Revising” with Podcasting: Keeping Readers in Mind as Students Listen to and Rethink Their Writing. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, no. 6, pp. 522-529. International Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20464458
  14. 14. “ Students…” <ul><li>“ Students seem to be more motivated to do their best when they know they are publishing for a worldwide audience.” (“Proof…” page 522) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This article taught me the idea of using podcasting and blogs as a way of proofreading. I felt as though this is a good way to get the technology into the classroom in a very educational way. I loved that this gets the children involved in a “fun” way to them. Also, I remember as a child when we did poems in third grade, our teacher sent them to her friend that was a publisher. She put them in a bound book for our class. I remember that when she told us they were going in a book I felt the motivation to do illustrations with my poem to make it the best. I would have to agree with the quote that students are more motivated when they know other people will see it other than the teacher and their parents. </li></ul></ul>Davis, Anne. (March 2009). “Proof-Revising” with Podcasting: Keeping Readers in Mind as Students Listen to and Rethink Their Writing. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, no. 6, pp. 522-529. International Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20464458
  15. 15. Work Cited <ul><li>Boling, Erica. (March 2008). Technology in Literacy Education: Collaborative Literacy: Blogs and Internet Projects. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 504-506. International Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20204621 </li></ul><ul><li>Davis, Anne. (March 2009). “Proof-Revising” with Podcasting: Keeping Readers in Mind as Students Listen to and Rethink Their Writing. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, no. 6, pp. 522-529. International Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20464458 </li></ul><ul><li>Zawilinski, Lisa. (May 2009). HOT Blogging: A Framework for Blogging to Promote Higher Order Thinking. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 62, No. 8, pp. 650-661. Internationl Reading Association. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20486620 </li></ul>

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