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  1. 1. When you hear the words
  2. 2. When you hear the words “Eastern thought” & “learning”
  3. 3. When you hear the words “Eastern thought” & “learning” you might think of this: ––––>
  4. 4. When you hear the words “Eastern thought” & “learning” you might think of this: ––––>
  5. 5. Fortunately: you’d be wrong
  6. 6. Fortunately: you’d be wrong
  7. 7. Fortunately: you’d be wrong We actually mean this: <––––
  8. 8. ✤ infusing Eastern principles into our classrooms is very serious business ✤ it isn’t a matter of merely copycatting procedures that Asian teachers use ✤ or even working on the same subjects or applying identical methods
  9. 9. Nope
  10. 10. Try again!
  11. 11. IN FACT ...
  12. 12. Values like balance, self-reflection & mental awareness It’s all about how Eastern values can supplement and highlight our own theories
  13. 13. Some points to consider: One through six.
  14. 14. SIDDHARTHA GAUTAMA =1=
  15. 15. Buddhists consider him their “Supreme Buddha”
  16. 16. His father was a king, and he was raised with the teachings of India’s best tutors
  17. 17. Yet he left home to pursue an ascetic, humble life
  18. 18. This isn’t for you, of course. It’s for everyone ELSE in the class who doesn’t know what ‘ascetic’ means. ;)
  19. 19. Through starvation,
  20. 20. self-mortification,
  21. 21. self-mortification, (close your eyes)
  22. 22. fierce self-discipline,
  23. 23. & constant meditation
  24. 24. He hoped to achieve pure religious fulfillment.
  25. 25. SIDDHARTHA GAUTAMA
  26. 26. Fortunately
  27. 27. He followed that by getting something to eat
  28. 28. And (as well) he discovered some moral precepts:
  29. 29. The Four Noble Truths
  30. 30. The Four Noble Truths I.Suffering is everywhere in our lives
  31. 31. The Four Noble Truths I.Suffering is everywhere in our lives II.Craving and desire leads to that suffering
  32. 32. The Four Noble Truths I.Suffering is everywhere in our lives II.Craving and desire leads to that suffering III.Giving up one’s cravings means the end of one’s suffering
  33. 33. The Four Noble Truths I.Suffering is everywhere in our lives II.Craving and desire leads to that suffering III.Giving up one’s cravings means the end of one’s suffering IV.Balance in all things: right view & action
  34. 34. He arrived at these principles on his Thinking, own: reflecting on his life, & making mistakes
  35. 35. THESE TRUTHS MATTER TO US, AS EDUCATORS, FOR THEIR PEDAGOGIC (NOT SOLELY SPIRITUAL) WORTH
  36. 36. THESE TRUTHS MATTER TO US, AS EDUCATORS, FOR THEIR PEDAGOGIC (NOT SOLELY SPIRITUAL) WORTH For instance: a student should (or might) shed the desire to land upon a single, correct answer, and instead concentrate on the process that would lead her there.
  37. 37. THESE TRUTHS MATTER TO US, AS EDUCATORS, FOR THEIR PEDAGOGIC (NOT SOLELY SPIRITUAL) WORTH For instance Part II: maybe a student could devote her time more evenly to a variety of tasks; or when working on a single task, counterbalance her approaches to the work, never favouring one far and above the others
  38. 38. Siddhartha realized that his most-cherished lessons were those he’d stumbled upon in his own meditation and thoughts.
  39. 39. Siddhartha realized that his most-cherished lessons were those he’d stumbled upon in his own meditation and thoughts. Following dogmas and dictates (even others’ examples) only led him away from himself and his own understanding. It gave him no gain.
  40. 40. He realized that his most- cherished lessons were those he’d stumbled upon in his own meditation and thoughts. Following dogmas and dictates (even others’ examples) only led him away from himself and his own understanding. It gave him no gain.
  41. 41. BUDDHIST ENLIGHTENMENT =2=
  42. 42. ✤ Sartori, or Enlightenment, is the ultimate goal for a Zen Buddhist ✤ it’s one’s realization of the true nature of the cosmos, a state of non-thought (=blankness of mind) ✤ usually very sudden or spontaneous
  43. 43. ✤ Sartori, or Enlightenment, is the ultimate goal for a Zen Buddhist ✤ it’s one’s realization of the true nature of the cosmos, a state of non-thought (=blankness of mind) ✤ usually very sudden or spontaneous AHA!
  44. 44. ✤ sometimes, it’s a result of a koan
  45. 45. ✤ sometimes, it’s a result of a koan ✤ koan: a riddle for self-contemplative or self- reflective purposes; often one without any ‘regular’ or ‘straightforward’ answer
  46. 46. ✤ sometimes, it’s a result of a koan ✤ koan: a riddle for self-contemplative or self- reflective purposes; often one without any ‘regular’ or ‘straightforward’ answer ✤ “What is the sound of one hand clapping?”
  47. 47. INSTRUCTION: Watch video clip
  48. 48. ZEN & BODHIDARMA =3=
  49. 49. BODHIDHARMA
  50. 50. BODHIDHARMA ➡ first patriarch of Chinese Buddhism ➡ introduced Buddhism to East Asia (from India) ➡ we consider him the leader of the Zen Buddhists
  51. 51. BODHIDHARMA ➡ first patriarch of Chinese Buddhism ➡ introduced Buddhism to East Asia (from India) ➡ we consider him the leader of the Zen Buddhists
  52. 52. He encouraged his followers – including you – to spend time wall-gazing to quiet the mind
  53. 53. * less dependence on scripture & texts He encouraged his followers – including you – to spend time wall-gazing to quiet the mind
  54. 54. * less dependence on scripture & texts He encouraged his followers – including you – to spend time wall-gazing to quiet the mind * become the master of your own mind
  55. 55. * less dependence on scripture & texts He encouraged his followers *reflect – including you – on & to spend time discover wall-gazing to quiet the mind yourself through daily meditation & thought * become the master of your own mind
  56. 56. BODHIDHARMA ➡ believed each student had all requisite virtues inside already ➡ taught that all sentient beings (incl. students!) had 1. ability 2. promise and 3. purpose ➡ considered these values definitive w/r/t attaining Enlightenment
  57. 57. I. VIRTUE AND DISCIPLINE II. MEDITATION AND CONCENTRATION III. DISCERNMENT AND WISDOM
  58. 58. 3 MAIN GOALS: I. VIRTUE AND DISCIPLINE II. MEDITATION AND CONCENTRATION III. DISCERNMENT AND WISDOM
  59. 59. 3 MAIN GOALS: I. VIRTUE AND DISCIPLINE II. MEDITATION AND CONCENTRATION III. DISCERNMENT AND WISDOM
  60. 60. 3 MAIN GOALS: I. VIRTUE AND DISCIPLINE II. MEDITATION AND CONCENTRATION III. DISCERNMENT AND WISDOM
  61. 61. 3 MAIN Whaddoes this hafta do wif educatzion? GOALS: I. VIRTUE AND DISCIPLINE II. MEDITATION AND CONCENTRATION III. DISCERNMENT AND WISDOM
  62. 62. Thanks, Poindexter!
  63. 63. Many of Bodhidharma’s espoused values are ones we promote in our public education system
  64. 64. Many of Bodhidharma’s espoused values are ones we promote in our public education system Some of his approaches for meditation overlap with teaching methods: things like Experiential Learning (eg. Outdoor Education & labs), anecdotal accounts, and high charged and engaged discussions:
  65. 65. Many of Bodhidharma’s espoused values are ones we promote in our public education system Some of his approaches for meditation overlap with teaching methods: things like Experiential Learning (eg. Outdoor Education & labs), anecdotal accounts, and high charged and engaged discussions:
  66. 66. Many of Bodhidharma’s espoused values are ones we promote in our public education system Some of his approaches for meditation overlap with teaching methods: things like Experiential Learning (eg. Outdoor Education & labs), anecdotal accounts, and high charged and engaged discussions:
  67. 67. And don’t forget ...
  68. 68. EVERYONE’S CAPABLE
  69. 69. NIRVANA =4=
  70. 70. A state free from suffering Nirvana is something like a Buddhist Heaven
  71. 71. What’s salient about this w/r/t teaching is this: It’s a state of physical and mental purity that may allow a student to be deeply connected in his understanding to the subject matter
  72. 72. What’s salient about this w/r/t teaching is this: For example: when teaching a student a history lesson, pointing that student toward the process and methods of ‘history’ rather than simple historical facts
  73. 73. What’s salient about this w/r/t teaching is this: Process and understanding take priority over answers and figures.
  74. 74. INSTRUCTION No. 2: Watch mini-demonstration the second (to the left)
  75. 75. ZEN IN THE 11 + 12 CURRICULA =5=
  76. 76. <<––––––––––– INSTRUCTION NO. 3: you know the drill
  77. 77. ZEN AND THE ART OF TEACHING =6=
  78. 78. Following Eastern principles means a rich tapestry of possibility
  79. 79. Whether silent reflection, engaged dialogue, hands-on learning
  80. 80. Or epiphanic moments buried at the core of a lesson plan
  81. 81. A student can absorb a Western curriculum, and like technology-in-the-classroom, enhance it with these Eastern values.
  82. 82. And: realize and accept all the understanding the lesson provides.
  83. 83. On their own.
  84. 84. For their own end.
  85. 85. Let’s go home; we’re done!
  86. 86. • Discuss the following: • How could this benefit you in your teaching of your own subject area? • List pros and cons of its inclusion into your curriculum. • Did you like our presentation?

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