Final4 Disertation Word

1,037 views

Published on

This is my planned disertation outline which will begin in 2010

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,037
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • <number>
  • <number>
  • The 10 commitments and bridging for holistic care1. Value the voice (Listen)2. Respect the language(Emotive content) 3. Be curious (sincerity) 4. Become the apprentice (let them teach you) 5. Reveal their wisdom (who were they before?) 6. Be transparent (Tell them about yourself and what’s going on in your life) 7. Use the toolkit (find out what has worked for others) 8. Craft the step bey<number>
  • Final4 Disertation Word

    1. 1. Memory Box P.R.N How are You? Presented by : Joy Mason BSN,RN
    2. 2. Who Am I ?
    3. 3. How can I tell what stage of Alzheimer’s Dementia a person is in?
    4. 4. How can I talk to a person with Dementia? She seems like she’s in another world at times There are multiple theories and research that attempt to explain the meaning of the world of the dementia person. Phenomenological perspectives  Husserl-the world as we experience it  Haley-the world as social network satisfaction  Stommel et al.-the world as being stress oriented A NURSING THEORY of HUMAN BECOMING  Parse-the world as being rhythmical, having meaning, evolving, engaging and disengaging in the world as the individual person understands it. RALPH’S STORY
    5. 5. Life Patterns as Rhythmical? Friend or Colleague Socialization Lunch Family or spouse Socialization Wind down Supper Worry a little Wind down WORK , AFTERNOON ACTIVITY Entertainment and Enjoyment Relaxation Wakefulness Sleep
    6. 6. There is soothing in Routine Re-create my life rhythm
    7. 7. Engagement/Speak Alzheimer's Validate Feelings even if the words are all wrong The Tidal Model Theory: A radical approach to person-centered care Let them take the lead, they are the author of their own story
    8. 8. Reminisce and Connect Create a sense of love and belonging Always invite and be polite Use humor, encourage response, have a conversation and be sincere
    9. 9. Maslow: a systematic approach to discovery of need Alzheimer words … expressing unmet need If my physiological needs are  not met I can get stressed out and tense If I don’t feel safe I may say  things like “I want to go home” I need to love and be loved,  “Talk to me” Let me do things. Give praise  Let me express myself with  ART
    10. 10. What if I can’t understand what the person with Dementia wants? Unusual behavior can be the expression of an unmet need
    11. 11. Meaningful Activity for Alzheimer/Dementia A Conceptual Framework ACTIVITIES THEY MASTERED PIAGET IN REVERSE CASE STUDIES Writing FAST Formal Howard operational Mild Alz Books, Stage Movies 11 yr News Lit Muriel 4 & up Chores, Movies Concrete Moderate folding, Mary operational cooking 7-11 yr Stage Serration, Flower old 5 Gerda arranging Pre- Moderate/Severe Flashlights operational Phillip 2-7 yr Stage Sally old 6 Dough rolling Sensory-motor Gloria Severe Tootsie Birth-2 pops Stage Thelma pops yr old Sensory 7 Music
    12. 12. OBJECTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT THAT HAVE PERSONAL MEANING Inter-reactive objects have personal meaning unique to the individual. 
    13. 13. WHAT DO OBJECTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT MEAN TO ALZHEIMER PERSONS ? Some common inter-reactive objects provide memory stimulation and a personal life connection EXAMPLES  What if one of your fondest memories of your mom was that on cold snowy days she always made you a cup of hot chocolate? GIVE ME A HOT CHOCOLATE AND CUP (It’s ok if I make a mess)  What if golf was your dad’s favorite sport? GIVE ME A GOLFBALL TO HOLD  What if your mom was a housewife and raised a family of 5. GIVE ME KITCHEN UTENSILS, A BAG OF BISQUICK LET ME MIX WITH WATER AND MAKE A DOUGH BALL  What if your dad was a fix it yourself kind of dad his entire life? GIVE ME A FLASHLIGHT AND BATTERIES AND ASK ME TO PUT IT TOGETHER
    14. 14. Follow the Concept Art as Expression “a conversation with paint” Seasonal cueing with color and objects are connections to the environment.  Colors have meaning  Handling materials are reminiscent and expressive. A single brush stroke with a color of choice is a job well done
    15. 15. Music can be a life connection Music can stimulate memory  Music can affect appetite  Music can induce or reduce stress  Music combines movement, tactile, sensation with melody, vocalization and percussion. MUSIC PROVOKES RESPONSE
    16. 16. MAINTAINING CONNECTION: What are some of the benefits of providing Inter-reactive objects for persons with dementia? Fine and Gross motor Builds self-esteem  skill means they can Maintains dignity  continue to Reduces stress   Comb hair or brush Reduces caregiver  teeth burden  Eat independently Provides   Dress or choose Environmental clothing connection  Provide some self care.
    17. 17. CONNECT OR DISCONNECT ? evaluate response 1. BODY LANGUAGE SHOULD RELAX 2. FACIAL FEATURES SHOULD SOFTEN 3. TONE OF LANGUAGE SHOULD BE APPROPRIATE (even when the words are wrong) 4. DIRECT EYE CONTACT IS ACHIEVED 5. ATTEMPTS ARE MADE TO TOUCH OR UTILIZE OBJECTS Change objects according to response
    18. 18. Discussion True Care-giving is… Expertise in understanding the human response to health and well being. Gathering and synthesizing That knowledge can be empirical , ethical ,esthetic or personal ( Carper, B.A., 1978) Teaching is most effectively when it is reflective, respectful, and intimately practiced in the patterns of knowing of others.
    19. 19. References Camp, C., (2005) Montessori-Based Activities for Persons with Dementia Menorah Park, Cosgrove, S., (2006) A complement to lifestyle assessment: Using Montessori sensorial experiences to enhance and intensify early recollections The Journal of Individual Psychology 62,1 pp.47-58 Cossentino, J., (2005) Ritualizing Expertise: A Non Montessorian View of the Montessori Method American Journal of Education Feb. pp.211-244 Downs, M., (2005), Awareness in dementia: In the eye of the beholder Editorial- Aging and Mental Health March pp.381-383 Howorth, P., Saper, J., (2003) The dimensions of insight in people with dementia Aging and Mental Health 7(2) pp. 113-122
    20. 20. References Kitwood, T. (1997) The experience of dementia Aging and Mental Health 1(1) pp.13-22 Kolanowski, A., Whall, A., (2000) Toward Holistic Theory-Based intervention for dementia behavior Holistic Nursing Practice 14(2) pp.67-76 Korfmacher, J., Spicer,P., (2002) Toward an Understanding of the child’s experience in a Montessori Early head Start Program Infant Mental Health Markova, I., et al (2005) Awareness in dementia: Conceptual issues Aging and Mental Health Sept 9(5) pp.386-393 Schreiner, A., et al. (2005) Positive affect among nursing home residents with Alzheimer's dementia: The effect of recreational activity Aging and Mental Health March pp.129-134 Upton, N., Reed, V., (2006) What does Phenomenology Offer to the Study of Caregiving The International Journal of Psychiatric Nursing Research 11,2 pp.1241-1254

    ×