Reflecting on Transnational Feminist Networks

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Reflecting on Transnational Feminist Networks

  1. 1. Reflecting on Transnational Feminist Networks: The Experience of the Women’s Caucus for Gender Justice in the ICC by Lourdes Veneracion-Rallonza Miriam College, Philippines “ Discussing Transnational Civil Society” German Science Foundation’s Research Training Group 19 June 2009 University of Hildesheim
  2. 2. Conceptual Grounding <ul><li>Feminism as discourse and movement </li></ul><ul><li>Distinguishing between </li></ul><ul><li>- ‘ international’: anything that goes beyond the boundaries of the territorial state (Anderson 2000); the universalizing tendencies of jurisprudence and legal philosophy (Barlow 2000) </li></ul><ul><li>- ‘global’: animated by the participation of non-state actors in conferences and summits (particularly those on human rights) organized largely by the United Nations (Catagay, Grown and Santiago 1986; Antrobus 2004) </li></ul><ul><li>- ‘ transnational’: any interrelation (state or non-state) or transaction (political, economic, cultural) that occurs within the multiplicity of dimensions and blur the distinction between national and international boundaries (True 1999; Basu 2000; Moghadam 2000 ) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Conceptual Grounding <ul><li>Transnational advocacy networks (TANs) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Tactics </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>- information politics </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>- symbolic politics </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>- leverage politics </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>- accountability politics </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Influence </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>- network influence (e.g. issue creation & agenda setting, impact on discursive positions of actors, effect on institutional procedures, changes in policies, instigating behavior changes) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>- issue characteristics (bodily harm to vulnerable individuals, legal opportunity equality) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Conceptual Grounding <ul><li>Norm entrepreneurs </li></ul><ul><li>- “agents having strong notions about appropriate or desirable behavior in the community” (Finnemore and Sikkink 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>- engage in collective action framing through the strategic use of existing international norms or through their contestations against them </li></ul>
  5. 5. Conceptual Grounding <ul><li>Transnational feminist networks (TFNs) </li></ul><ul><li>- “are structures organized above the national level that unite women from three or more countries around a common agenda” (Moghadam 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>- actors in transnational public space </li></ul><ul><li>- influences actions/policies with feminist perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>- like TANs: exchange information and engage in research, lobbying, and advocacy work to advance their goals </li></ul><ul><li>- like norm entrepreneurs: participate in the construction, use, and reconstruction of international norms and conventions </li></ul>
  6. 6. Women’s Caucus as TFN <ul><li>Involvement after 1994 Beijing Women’s Conference </li></ul><ul><li>Part of NGO Coalition for an International Criminal Court (CICC) </li></ul><ul><li>Drew from past experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Feminist process </li></ul><ul><li>‘alien’ terrain of ICC process </li></ul>
  7. 7. Women’s Caucus as Norm Entrepreneur <ul><li>Political opportunity structures </li></ul><ul><li>- discursive space </li></ul><ul><li>- internationally institutionalized mechanisms </li></ul><ul><li>- increasing awareness in WHR norms </li></ul><ul><li>- ICTY and ICTR </li></ul><ul><li>Centrality of ‘gender’ as principled belief </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>- outreach </li></ul><ul><li>- legal drafts </li></ul><ul><li>- lobbying </li></ul>
  8. 8. Some points for reflection...

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