September 29wiki

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  • -fascinated with mathematics and literature and brought both to
  • Concern with generating ideas for potential writing projects.
  • Concern with generating ideas for potential writing projects.
  • September 29wiki

    1. 1. Teaching Genres <br />September 29, 2009<br />
    2. 2. Three Parts For Today . . . <br />Introduction to genre definitions<br />Place of genre in teaching English<br />Approaches to teaching genre and its connection to the four strands<br />
    3. 3. Genres<br />Genres are vague categories with no fixed boundaries, they are formed by sets of conventions, and many works cross into multiple genres by way of borrowing and recombining these conventions.<br />
    4. 4. Raymond Queneau<br />Exercises in Style<br />The simple story of a man seeing the same stranger twice in one day.<br />
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    12. 12. QueneauSonnets<br />Hundred Thousand Billion Poems<br />
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    14. 14. Teaching genres is important<br />focuses attention and teaches noticing<br />points to the history and context of the form<br />teaches habits of mind<br />develops practices for reading and writing<br />
    15. 15. Engaging Minds<br />Enabling constraints are starting places for possible paths, not routes to be followed. The space of possibilities opens up only in the actual moment of teaching. <br />They are not prescriptive (i.e., they don’t dictate what must be done), but expansive (i.e., they indicate what might be done, in part by indicating what must not be done.)<br />e.g. Ten Commandments, rules of hockey<br />
    16. 16. Randy Bomer, Time for Meaning<br />Every piece of writing, every text we read, comes to us both as a text—the piece it is—and as a kind of text—an instance of genre. And what kind of thing it is puts some limits as to what we expect to find there. Genre, an oft-overlooked cueing system in reading, constrains our prediction, and lays down a track for our reading.<br />
    17. 17. Donald Murray, Learning by Teaching<br />Most writers view the world as a fiction writer, a reporter, a poet, or a historian. The writer sees experience as a plot or a lyric poem or a news story or a chronicle. The writers uses such literary traditions to understand life.<br />
    18. 18. Lucy Calkins, The Art of Teaching Writing<br />Students need to inhabit the genre if they are to master it .<br />
    19. 19. Randy Bomer<br />Helping students learn how to learn about different genres of writing empowers them to find a way of writing that counts in the different communities they will move through in their lives. I don’t teach poetry so that kids will remember all about writing poems and be able to do it forever. I want them to develop habits of mind related to learning a genre, so that they can learn in whatever genres they need.<br />
    20. 20. Inquiry Method<br />From Thinking Through Genre, Heather Lattimer<br />What makes this genre unique?<br />What do we need to know and be able to do in order to be successful readers of this genre?<br />How can we best interact with this text and what can we take away from it?<br />What language and structures do successful writers of this genre use, and how can that inform our own writing?<br />What processes are appropriate for gathering ideas, drafting, editing, and publishing our work in this genre?<br />
    21. 21. Teaching Multiliteracies<br />Situated effortful, meaningful practice<br />Overt instruction that introduces metalanguage to describe and interpret.<br />Critical framing to interpret the social and cultural context of particular designs of meaning.<br />Transformed practice, which puts meaning to work in other contexts.<br />
    22. 22. Genres and Curriculum Expectations<br />Develop a character who will deliver a short monologue; create the dialogue for a scene in a selected film after viewing the scene with the sound off; select and develop ideas from their journals to use in a poem; record facts from a mock press conference to use in writing a news article; read several reviews of a movie to find comments to use in a promotional poster for the movie; over the course of one week, write a series of “after-school” vignettes based on observations made at home, et. . . .; read local and community newspapers to determine local issues and choose one issue to explore in an article . . . (Gr. 12 College)<br />
    23. 23. Genres and Curriculum Expectations<br />Develop a character who will deliver a short monologue; create the dialogue for a scene in a selected film after viewing the scene with the sound off; select and develop ideas from their journals to use in a poem; record facts from a mock press conference to use in writing a news article; read several reviews of a movie to find comments to use in a promotional poster for the movie; over the course of one week, write a series of “after-school” vignettes based on observations made at home, et. . . .; read local and community newspapers to determine local issues and choose one issue to explore in an article . . . (Gr. 12 College)<br />
    24. 24. Teaching Approaches<br />hypertext and other digital forms—different entry points<br />close reading practices<br />shifting genres<br />
    25. 25. Text-based hypertext<br />Eastgate. com’s reading room<br />
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    29. 29. (in which the scene before me is blurred no matter how hard I squint, blink, and rub my eyes; I persevere, haunted by the suspicion not that I am blind, but that I&apos;m not looking properly, that all my efforts will punch a hole in the scene before me and I will see clearly, but see only my bedroom ceiling, denied access forever to the tantalizing secret, which turned out to be not far away behind fogs and darkness but too near, as if I tried to make out the pattern on a translucent scarf laid over my face. The answer, of course, is to look with my dream eyes, not the eyes of my body.)<br /> (Dreams)<br />
    30. 30. Stevie:<br />I think it works because the whole story is thoughts basically. . . . I know that my thoughts . . . bounce from one thing to another so I think it’s . . . almost a stream-of-consciousness. It’s like a written portrait of the human mind almost.<br />
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    32. 32. Scalable City by Sheldon Brown<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvsAudGTsGY<br />
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    34. 34. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZHh70xpi-M<br />
    35. 35. 1. What are the devices used to represent and reorder experience? (Eco, 1994) <br />2. What is the dynamic relationship (if any) between writing and other modalities?<br />3.What kinds of interpretations and meaning-making are possible through the form?<br />
    36. 36. Close Reading<br /> Jane Gallop (2000) calls for the “close reading” of texts as an ethical practice. We need to slow down, she suggests, and pay attention to the words, the syntax, the punctuation, rather than predetermining what will be found—just as Maxine Greene call on us to pay heed “to attend to shapes, patterns, sounds, rhythms, figures of speech, contours, and lines.”<br />
    37. 37. Francine Prose (Reading Like a Writer)<br />We all begin as close readers. Even before we learn to read, the process of being read aloud to, and of listening, is one in which we are taking in one word after another, one phrase at a time, in which we are paying attention to whatever each work or phrase is transmitting. Word by word is how we learn to hear and then read . . .<br />
    38. 38. Reading Like a Writer . . .<br />I read closely, word by work, sentence by sentence, pondering each deceptively minor decision the writer had made. And though it’s impossible to recall every source of inspiration and instruction, I can remember the novels and stories that seemed to me revelations: wells of beauty and pleasure that were also textbooks, private lessons in the art of fiction.<br />
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    40. 40. Poem (William Carlos Williams)<br /> As the cat <br /> climbed over<br /> the top of<br /> the jamcloset<br /> first the right<br /> forefoot<br /> carefully<br /> then the hind<br /> stepped down<br /> into the pit of<br /> the empty<br /> flowerpot<br />

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