Urban Models for MEDCs

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  • Cheers guys, this was really handy and got me out of a sticky spot!
    Best Wishes
    Ben!
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  • wow

    becca its charlotte =]

    i was readin your comment n thinkin ohh i wonder if ther doin the same c.w as me

    and then i read your name and i was like =o

    lol

    so i made a user name just to tell you that

    feel privilleged ;]

    and did we do this in the lesson?
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  • thank you it helped me with my geography coursework

    =]
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Urban Models for MEDCs

  1. 1. PUT THE PICTURES IN ORDER 1 2 3 4 5 6
  2. 2. Urban Models
  3. 3. Burgess’ Model <ul><li>On a plain piece of paper have a go at remembering the Burgess model. </li></ul><ul><li>HINT: this is the one with lots of circles! </li></ul>
  4. 4. Burgess Model
  5. 5. Hoyt’s Model <ul><li>On a plain piece of paper have a go at remembering the Hoyt model. </li></ul><ul><li>HINT: this is the one with circles and wedges! </li></ul>
  6. 6. Hoyt’s Model
  7. 7. Quick Task on Burgess and Hoyt <ul><li>Using the information we have just spoken about write a short description of each of the models on your sheet in the ‘description’ segment. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What the model is showing – how it is structured? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What information it is based upon </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Limitations of the Burgess Model <ul><li>Does not account for the physical landscape </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on Chicago and even this city does not follow the pattern due to the coastline! </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Burgess did not foresee the development of commuter villages. </li></ul><ul><li>Urban regeneration and gentrification has changed the status of housing in inner cities. </li></ul><ul><li>Council estates in the suburbs do not fit model. </li></ul><ul><li>Decentralisation of shops and industry does not fit the model – out of town shopping centres. </li></ul><ul><li>BUT – Simple, good basic understanding, idea of </li></ul><ul><li>city growth explained well </li></ul>
  9. 9. Limitations of the Hoyt Model <ul><li>Like Burgess there is little reference to the physical environment. </li></ul><ul><li>No reference to out-of-town services. </li></ul><ul><li>The growth of a sector can be stopped as land-use leapfrogs out of the old inner city. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Council estates have prevented the large high class sector developing in other areas of Bristol </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BUT – Some cities seem to follow the model, looks at effects of communication routes, provides alternate explanations to Burgess’ model. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Harris and Ullman Model <ul><li>Otherwise known as the multiple nuclei model. </li></ul><ul><li>Idea that cities are not formed around one CBD but a number of separate nuclei in the urban pattern. </li></ul><ul><li>These nodes become specialised and differentiated based on a number of attributes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Differential accessibility. Some activities require specialized facilities such as port and rail terminals. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Land use compatibility. Similar activities group together. This may be defined as centripetal forces. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Land use incompatibility. Some activities are repelling each-other such as high quality residential and heavy industrial. This may be defined as centrifugal forces. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Location suitability. Some activities cannot afford the rent of the optimal site for their location . </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Harris and Ullman Model <ul><li>The multiple nuclei model was the first to consider the complexity of the city and its surrounding areas </li></ul><ul><li>Realisation that the CBD is not the only part of a city that affects land use </li></ul><ul><li>Still a simplification of the urban landscape </li></ul><ul><li>Physical landscape still not entirely integrated </li></ul>
  12. 12. Mann’s Model <ul><li>A British Urban Land Use Model. </li></ul><ul><li>A combination of the ideas of Burgess and Hoyt with both concentric rings and sectors. </li></ul><ul><li>Based on Sheffield, Nottingham and Huddersfield. </li></ul><ul><li>The role of the prevailing wind is important. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Mann’s Model – Limitations and Advantages <ul><li>Once again there is no reference to the physical landscape. </li></ul><ul><li>No acknowledgement of the multiple centres in Harris and Ullman’s model. </li></ul><ul><li>Does not forsee the advent of reurbanisation that is happening today with the regeneration of decaying old industrial centres. </li></ul><ul><li>BUT </li></ul><ul><li>Takes in the role of council estates in the suburbs. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes the influence of environmental factors. </li></ul><ul><li>Makes a model more specific to the UK . </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul>
  14. 14. Mann’s Model Can we relate it to Ipswich?
  15. 15. Round-Up <ul><li>On a new piece of paper: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sketch either the multiple nuclei model or Mann’s model as best you can remember it. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write down the three points you think are the most important from this lesson. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write one thing you have learnt today that you did not know before </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hand this to me as you leave! </li></ul></ul>

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