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Library Instruction in a Small Academic Library

                               Mary Broussard
                           ...
Agenda
 Name of the Game
 The Problem
 Introduction to Game-Based Learning
 My Experiences
 Are Games Right for You?
...
Name of the Game
Name of the Game (1)
Name of the Game (2)
Name of the Game (3)
Name of the Game (4)
Name of the Game (5)
Name of the Game (6)
Name of the Game (7)
Name of the Game (8)
Name of the Game (9)
Name of the Game (10)
Problem Part 1: Boredom
Problem Part 2: Confusion
Problem Part 3: Frustration
Video Games
 Games are mental work
Video Games
 Involve learning how to
    Move character
    Defeat bad guys
    Solve puzzles
    Recover from injuri...
Video Games


 How can we use tap into
 this joy of learning to
 teach?
Game Generation
 Those who grew up with video games (under 40)
 Deeply affected by games
 Brains programmed for
    Sp...
College Students
               Born when video games were
                in full swing
               Game industry su...
Prensky’s Six Elements of a Game
      Rules
 1.
      Goals/objectives
 2.
Prensky’s Six Elements of a Game
    Rules
 1.
 2. Goals/objectives
 3. Outcomes/feedback
 4. Interaction
Prensky’s Six Elements of a Game
       Rules
 1.
       Goals/objectives
 2.
       Outcomes/feedback
 3.
       Interact...
Fun & Play = Engagement
 Engagement almost
  universally seen as an
  important part of effective
  learning
 We are bio...
Phase 1
Phase 2
Secret Agents in the Library
 Importance of story
    Changes from “activity” to “game”
    Excites emotional engagemen...
Secret Agents in the Library
 Integrating real-world interaction
    Students given title, then must find
    Code plac...
Secret Agents in the Library
 Teams’ final scores posted in front of room
 Created friendly competition
 Added to stude...
Secret Agents in the Library
                 Entirely active learning
                 Students taught each
           ...
Secret Agents in the Library
 Biggest problem:
 databases
   Results always changing
   Often results not
    consisten...
Assessment
 Humming James Bond
  theme song
 Holding hand like a gun
 “Stop spying on us!”
 Classroom response
  softw...
Sample Review Question
 What is one indication that a journal is scholarly?

   A. Many colorful pictures
   B. Written...
Responses to review questions
Question   Group 1   Group 2   Group 3   Total Ave.
1           88%       75%       84%     ...
Was this a fun way to learn about
the library?

Answer   Group 1   Group 2   Group 3   Total Ave.
 Yes      75%       62% ...
Phase 3
Next
 More animations, humor, &
    real-world interaction
   Get reference librarian at
    desk involved
   Plagiaris...
Are Games Right for You?
 Don’t be intimidated by
 large schools’ projects…
 most aren’t doing it right
 anyway
Getting Started
 DON’T need lots of money or a professional
  programmer
 DO need software like Flash, and books like Fl...
Tips
 Look for high ROI           Plan before you build
 Start small and build on    Don’t be afraid of silly
 experie...
Doesn’t Have to be on Computer
                Greg Trefry’s presentation
                 on Big Games
                ...
How Can You Use Games?
 Instruction
 Tutorials
 Marketing/Outreach
I’m Generous!
 Contact me at any
  time for files or
  questions
 Giving credit
 Sharing your ideas
Conclusion
              A spoonful of sugar
               helps the medicine go
               down
              Slid...
My Games
 Adventures in Library Research:
  http://www.lycoming.edu/library/instruction/game.html
 It’s Alive:
  http://...
Other Games to Try
 Dream Chronicles
 Escape games, like Escape Artist at
  http://www.addictinggames.com/escapeartist.h...
Suggested Reading, Part 1
 SUGGESTED READING
 Beck, J.C. & Wade, M. (2004). Got Game? How the Gamer
    Generation is Re...
Suggested Reading, Part 2
 Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Game-Based Learning. New
  York: McGraw-Hill.
 Sugar, S. (1998). ...
Questions?



            Mary Broussard
             570-321-4068
        broussm@lycoming.edu
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Integrating Virtual & Physical Games

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A presentation for the HACC Information Literacy Symposium on May 14, 2009 in Harrisburg, PA. The presentation focuses on the use of home-made instructional games in the college library classroom.

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Integrating Virtual & Physical Games

  1. 1. Library Instruction in a Small Academic Library Mary Broussard Lycoming College
  2. 2. Agenda  Name of the Game  The Problem  Introduction to Game-Based Learning  My Experiences  Are Games Right for You?  Conclusion
  3. 3. Name of the Game
  4. 4. Name of the Game (1)
  5. 5. Name of the Game (2)
  6. 6. Name of the Game (3)
  7. 7. Name of the Game (4)
  8. 8. Name of the Game (5)
  9. 9. Name of the Game (6)
  10. 10. Name of the Game (7)
  11. 11. Name of the Game (8)
  12. 12. Name of the Game (9)
  13. 13. Name of the Game (10)
  14. 14. Problem Part 1: Boredom
  15. 15. Problem Part 2: Confusion
  16. 16. Problem Part 3: Frustration
  17. 17. Video Games  Games are mental work
  18. 18. Video Games  Involve learning how to  Move character  Defeat bad guys  Solve puzzles  Recover from injuries  Tap into communal resources
  19. 19. Video Games  How can we use tap into this joy of learning to teach?
  20. 20. Game Generation  Those who grew up with video games (under 40)  Deeply affected by games  Brains programmed for  Speed  Images  Multiple tasks  Parallel learning  See real life as a game
  21. 21. College Students  Born when video games were in full swing  Game industry surpassing movie and music industries  Almost all American children have “regular access” to video games, regardless of economic status  Take interactivity for granted
  22. 22. Prensky’s Six Elements of a Game Rules 1. Goals/objectives 2.
  23. 23. Prensky’s Six Elements of a Game Rules 1. 2. Goals/objectives 3. Outcomes/feedback 4. Interaction
  24. 24. Prensky’s Six Elements of a Game Rules 1. Goals/objectives 2. Outcomes/feedback 3. Interaction 4. Conflict/competition/challenge/opposition 5. Representation or story 6.
  25. 25. Fun & Play = Engagement  Engagement almost universally seen as an important part of effective learning  We are biologically built to learn through play (watch young children)  Studies show that when we are having a good time, we are more alert and our memory is stimulated
  26. 26. Phase 1
  27. 27. Phase 2
  28. 28. Secret Agents in the Library  Importance of story  Changes from “activity” to “game”  Excites emotional engagement  Students as secret agent rookies  Intruder in “information mainframe” (a.k.a. library)  Must find resources and protect their secrets
  29. 29. Secret Agents in the Library  Integrating real-world interaction  Students given title, then must find  Code placed in book  Couldn’t continue with game w/o code  Students must find print journal  Important to effectiveness of game
  30. 30. Secret Agents in the Library  Teams’ final scores posted in front of room  Created friendly competition  Added to student engagement  No other reward offered except pride
  31. 31. Secret Agents in the Library  Entirely active learning  Students taught each other  Computer served as “home base” and focused students’ attention on one task at a time
  32. 32. Secret Agents in the Library  Biggest problem: databases  Results always changing  Often results not consistent  ASU’s Quarantined
  33. 33. Assessment  Humming James Bond theme song  Holding hand like a gun  “Stop spying on us!”  Classroom response software (clickers)
  34. 34. Sample Review Question  What is one indication that a journal is scholarly?  A. Many colorful pictures  B. Written by a journalist  C. Presence of a bibliography
  35. 35. Responses to review questions Question Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Total Ave. 1 88% 75% 84% 82% 2 100% 100% 93% 98% 3 81% 100% 93% 91% 4 94% 100% 93% 96% 5 94% 85% 60% 80% 6 94% 75% 80% 83% 7 100% 100% 93% 98% 8 94% 100% 100% 98% 9 100% 100% 93% 98%
  36. 36. Was this a fun way to learn about the library? Answer Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Total Ave. Yes 75% 62% 53% 63% No 25% 38% 47% 37%
  37. 37. Phase 3
  38. 38. Next  More animations, humor, & real-world interaction  Get reference librarian at desk involved  Plagiarism game  Raider of the Lost Journal  Assessment  Big Games
  39. 39. Are Games Right for You?  Don’t be intimidated by large schools’ projects… most aren’t doing it right anyway
  40. 40. Getting Started  DON’T need lots of money or a professional programmer  DO need software like Flash, and books like Flash for Dummies and Beginning Flash Game for Dummies
  41. 41. Tips  Look for high ROI  Plan before you build  Start small and build on  Don’t be afraid of silly experience and student  Get student input feedback  TEST, TEST, TEST
  42. 42. Doesn’t Have to be on Computer  Greg Trefry’s presentation on Big Games  Eli Neiburger of the Ann Arbor District Library  Games that Teach by Steve Sugar  New York City’s Come Out & Play festival
  43. 43. How Can You Use Games?  Instruction  Tutorials  Marketing/Outreach
  44. 44. I’m Generous!  Contact me at any time for files or questions  Giving credit  Sharing your ideas
  45. 45. Conclusion  A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down  Slides and resources posted online
  46. 46. My Games  Adventures in Library Research: http://www.lycoming.edu/library/instruction/game.html  It’s Alive: http://www.lycoming.edu/library/instruction/itsalive.html  Secret Agent in the Library: http://www.lycoming.edu/library/instruction/secretagent. html  Plagiarism Game (in development): http://www.lycoming.edu/library/instruction/plagiarismga me.html
  47. 47. Other Games to Try  Dream Chronicles  Escape games, like Escape Artist at http://www.addictinggames.com/escapeartist.html  Water Busters at http://www2.seattle.gov/util/waterbusters/  Carnegie Mellon’s library games (though I think you have to have Flash on your computer to play them): http://www.library.cmu.edu/Libraries/etc/
  48. 48. Suggested Reading, Part 1  SUGGESTED READING  Beck, J.C. & Wade, M. (2004). Got Game? How the Gamer Generation is Reshaping Business Forever. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.  Broussard, M. Spoonful of Sugar: Instructional Games in Libraries http://gamesinlibraries.blogspot.com/  Finkelstein, E. & Leete, G. (2006). Macromedia Flash 8 For Dummies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.  Gee, J.P. (2003). What Video Games Have to Teach Us about Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.  Harris, A. (2006). Beginning Flash Game Programming for Dummies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.  Neiburger, E. (2008). Broadening Our Definition of Gaming: Big Games. Library Technology Reports, 44(3), 12-16.
  49. 49. Suggested Reading, Part 2  Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Game-Based Learning. New York: McGraw-Hill.  Sugar, S. (1998). Games that Teach: experiential activities for reinforcing learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.  Trefry, G. (2007). Big fun, big learning: Transforming the world through play. Presentation at ALA TechSource. http://gaming.techsource.ala.org/index.php/Big_Fun%2C_ Big_Learning:_Transforming_the_World_through_Play  Ward, D. (2007). Up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, a, b, select, start: Learning from games and gamers in library 2.0. In N. Courtney (Ed.), Library 2.0 and beyond: Innovative technologies and tomorrow’s user (pp. 105-118). Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.
  50. 50. Questions? Mary Broussard 570-321-4068 broussm@lycoming.edu

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