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Within3 Social Media - 2/4/10 BDI Healthcare Social Communications Leadership Forum

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Lance Hill, CEO, Within3

Published in: Business, Technology
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Within3 Social Media - 2/4/10 BDI Healthcare Social Communications Leadership Forum

  1. 1. Healthcare
 Professionals
and
 Social
Media February
2010
 Within3 Confidential
  2. 2. Are Healthcare Professionals really different than Consumers? ?
  3. 3. Real HCP networking - A medical conference poster session.
  4. 4. “3rd Generation” HCP social media sites are rushing onto the scene. 3rd
Genera0on:
 Ins0tu0on‐led
with
Iden0ty
&
Work
 2nd
Genera0on:
 Third
Party,
Anonymous
Communi0es
 1st
Genera0on:
 The
consumer
sites

  5. 5. “3rd Generation” HCP social media sites are rushing onto the scene. Ins0tu0on‐led
with
Iden0ty
&
Work
 3rd
Genera0on:
 Ins0tu0on‐led
with
Iden0ty
&
Work
 Third
Party,
Anonymous
Communi0es
 2nd
Genera0on:
 Third
Party,
Anonymous
Communi0es
 The
Consumer
Sites
 1st
Genera0on:
 The
consumer
sites

  6. 6. The American College of Gastroenterology launched GI Circle in October, 2009. Page
7

  7. 7. HCPs waited in line to join GI Circle at its launch. Page
8

  8. 8. Real work happens here: Authors discussing their abstracts online. Page
9

  9. 9. No one is anonymous in GI Circle.
  10. 10. How was user adoption? •  More
than
25%
of
mee0ng
aNendees
 (1,100
of
~4,000
aNendees)
ac0vated
their
 accounts
within
the
first
five
days
of
launch
 •  More
than
40%
of
abstracts
presented
at
 the
mee0ng
(480
of
~1,200
abstracts)
were
 “claimed”
by
their
authors
in
the
 community
 •  Thousands
of
searches
for
people
and
 content
were
executed
during
the
mee0ng
 •  Hundreds
of
network
connec0ons
 between
members
formed
 Online
kiosks
were
open
during
the
mee0ng
to
allow
 •  Key
sharing
among
members:

Discussions,
 annual
mee0ngs
aNendees
to
the
online
community.
 private
messages,
and
workspace
requests
 Page
11

  11. 11. How many “clicks” was that again? Low‐Rela7onship
‐
Web
1.0
Measures
 Increasing
Business
Value
 •  Tracking
your
Traffic
 High‐Rela7onship
Community
Measures
 •  Knowing
Your
Members
 •  Building
Engagement
 •  Being
In
the
Discussion
 •  Building

Influence
 Business
Outcome
Measures
 •  Business
Goals
and
ROI
 •  
Vary
by
Community
Type

  12. 12. Online
Communi7es
provide
significantly
more
opportuni7es
for
business
 value
than
“web
1.0”
sites.
 Low‐Rela7onship
‐
Web
1.0
Measures
 Track
Your
“Traffic”:



Visits,

Unique
Visitors,
Page
Views,
Click‐Throughs
 High‐Rela7onship
‐
Community
Measures
 Knowing
Your
Members
 Building
Engagement
 Being
in
the
Discussion
 Building
your
Influence
 •  CV
Informa0on
Updates
 •  Interac0ons
(Discussions,
 •  Leader‐to‐Member
 •  Network
Reach
 •  Contact
Informa0on
 Polls,
Documents,
News,
 Interac0ons
 •  Key
Topic
Responses
 Updates
 etc)
‐>
Posted,
Responded,
 •  Key
Topic
Discourse
 •  Iden0fica0on
of
Champions
 •  Publica0ons
Added
 Voted,
Shared,
or
 •  Responses
to
Leader
 •  Member
Growth
 •  Clinical
Trials
 Subscrip0ons
 Posts
 •  Growth
of
Related
Programs
 •  Added
Clinical
Interests
 •  Power‐Law
Measurement
 •  User
Percep0on
of
 •  User
Presenta0ons
or
 •  Added
Research
Interests
 •  Peers
Invited
 Community
 References
 •  Connec0ons
Formed
 •  Offline
Discussion
 •  Key
Segment
Analysis
 •  Directory
Searches
 Generated
 Example
Business
Outcome
Measures
 Key
Opinion
Leader
 Medical
Associa7on
 Advisory
Board
 Clinical
Trial
 •  MD
to
company
Interac0ons
 •  Author
Par0cipa0on
 •  Materials
Review
 •  %
Par0cipa0on
 •  New
MD
Rela0onships
 •  New
Science
Augmented
 Compliance
 •  Efficiency‐Related
 Formed
 •  New
Science
Disseminated
 •  %
Par0cipa0on
on
 Discussion
 •  Science
Exchanged
 •  Member
Engagement
 Assigned
Tasks
 •  Alert
Recep0on
 •  Connec0ons
Brokered
 between
Live
Mee0ngs
 •  Value
of
Informa0on
 Compliance
 between
MDs
 •  Email
Address
Updates
 Received
 •  Timeliness
of
 •  KOLs
Emerging
as
Brand
 •  CommiNee
Efficiency
 •  Moderator
Opinion
 Submission
of
Forms
 Champions
 •  Member
Growth
 •  Total
Cost
of
Ownership
 and
Data
 •  Invita0ons
Accepted

  13. 13. A
different
example:

A
community
of
Key
Opinion
Leaders
 •  MD
Interac0ons
improved
mul0‐ fold
year
over
year.
 •  Hundreds
of
private
messages
sent
 over
community
plaiorm.
 •  Several
“High
Touch”
events
such
 as
webinars
and
user‐generated
 “features”
were
generated.
 •  Four
community‐connected
KOLs
 emerged
as
key
champions.
 As
the
KOL
Network
solidified,
new
leaders
 •  Regional
community
now
 emerged.
 expanding
na0onally.

  14. 14. Some lessons to be learned from 3rd generation HCP online communities: 1.  A
New
Channel
is
Burs7ng
onto
the
Scene:

Not
since
the
early
days
of
the
web
 has
there
been
such
a
shij
in
the
online
channel.

Being
first
ma-ers.
 2.  Integra7on
is
Key:

Integrate
“offline”
events,
communica0on
strategies,
and
 content
with
online
community
events.
 3.  “Context”
is
King:

HCP
Communi0es
require
content,
real
work,
real
networks,
user
 safety,
and
“corporate
branding.”
 4.  Understand
Key
Regulatory
and
Compliance
Pre‐Requisites:

HIPAA
and
Stark
 for
Hospitals,
Off‐Label/AE
for
Pharmcos,
Privacy
and
Confiden0ality
for
everyone.
 5.  Communi7es
aren’t
simply
“launched”,
they
are
“cul7vated”:

Social
 principles
apply
–
especially
in
the
early
days
of
a
community.

 6.  Think
beyond
Web
1.0
Metrics:


There’s
a
lot
more
to
ROI
than
simply
“traffic”.


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