Big Game, Big Country <ul><li>North American hunters are fortunate; we have hundreds of millions of national forests and p...
<ul><li>My name is Greg Munther. I’m a biologist and retired Forest Service District Ranger. I’ve hunted from Siberia to B...
<ul><li>Good hunting demands good habitat.  All wildlife needs food, water and shelter from the elements in order to survi...
<ul><li>Habitat security pays off for big game and the hunters who pursue it. These bucks and bulls were taken on public l...
<ul><li>It’s not just about trophies. Big, mature animals are survivors —  the best breeding stock, keeping herds healthy ...
<ul><li>Biologists have documented this trend  over and over again.  When habitat is shot through with too many roads, ATV...
<ul><li>Habitat security pays off in other ways.  As a rule,  secure habitat provides longer hunting seasons and more libe...
<ul><li>Across the West, hunters, landowners and wildlife managers have another problem: harboring. Elk are driven off pub...
<ul><li>Something else is at stake. Many hunters greatly value the physical challenge, solitude and experience of hunting ...
<ul><li>We all use trucks and other rigs to get to our hunting spots. ATVs are popular, powerful  tools. There is a place ...
<ul><li>Get Involved: </li></ul><ul><li>•  Speak out for protecting big, wild country. </li></ul><ul><li>•  Get to know yo...
Enjoy America’s Backcountry Join Backcountry Hunters & Anglers Backcountry Hunters & Anglers PO Box 655 Eagle Point, OR  9...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Big Game, Big Country BHA

572 views

Published on

Primer on the importance of habitat security on national forests for big game and our hunting heritage. DRAFT by Backcountry Hunters & Anglers.

Published in: Sports
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
572
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Big Game, Big Country BHA

  1. 1. Big Game, Big Country <ul><li>North American hunters are fortunate; we have hundreds of millions of national forests and public land we are free to roam. Our big game herds are robust. We may not all find a world-record trophy, but we can all have a world-class experience. Let’s explore America’s backcountry…. </li></ul>By Greg Munther and Ben Long
  2. 2. <ul><li>My name is Greg Munther. I’m a biologist and retired Forest Service District Ranger. I’ve hunted from Siberia to Botswana. But my passion is roaming America’s national forests with my boots and my longbow. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Good hunting demands good habitat. All wildlife needs food, water and shelter from the elements in order to survive. But there is one important element: Room to roam and escape predators. Biologists call this need habitat security. Bottom line: Big, wild animals need big wild country. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Habitat security pays off for big game and the hunters who pursue it. These bucks and bulls were taken on public land, self-guided hunts and over-the counter tags. Of course, hard work and lady luck come to play. But when we lose habitat security, we see hunting opportunities and hunting quality disappear. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>It’s not just about trophies. Big, mature animals are survivors —  the best breeding stock, keeping herds healthy and able to survive predators like wolves and mountain lions. Remember, it takes a buck deer five years to reach his breeding and trophy prime; and seven years for a bull elk to do so. To live that long, they need big country. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Biologists have documented this trend over and over again. When habitat is shot through with too many roads, ATV routes and too much traffic, hunting opportunities disappear. That holds true for big game, from bighorn to bear and mule deer. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Habitat security pays off in other ways. As a rule, secure habitat provides longer hunting seasons and more liberal regulations, more over-the-counter tags . This kind of opportunity is crucial for passing on our hunting heritage — making sure our kids have opportunity to hunt in their busy lives. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Across the West, hunters, landowners and wildlife managers have another problem: harboring. Elk are driven off public land onto ranch land where everyday hunters are locked out. Lack of habitat security on national forests make this worse. In fact, one study in Montana found that ORVs were pushing elk onto closed ranches before the general hunting season even started. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Something else is at stake. Many hunters greatly value the physical challenge, solitude and experience of hunting in the remote backcountry. For many of us, wilderness hunting is hunting at its best , something that stirs our spirit. We need wild country completely separate from the noise, disturbance and pollution from machines. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>We all use trucks and other rigs to get to our hunting spots. ATVs are popular, powerful tools. There is a place for them on our national forests. But without reasonable limits— and effective enforcement — we will see our habitat erode and our hunting opportunities evaporate. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Get Involved: </li></ul><ul><li>•  Speak out for protecting big, wild country. </li></ul><ul><li>• Get to know your local Forest Service personnel and advocate for habitat. </li></ul><ul><li>•  Report violators, whether they are violating game laws, road closures or habitat protections. </li></ul><ul><li>•  Join Backcountry Hunters & Anglers TODAY. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Enjoy America’s Backcountry Join Backcountry Hunters & Anglers Backcountry Hunters & Anglers PO Box 655 Eagle Point, OR 97524 www.backcountryhunters.org

×