VeggiTop Design Brief

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By Kristy Allenby & Marcus Catsouphes

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VeggiTop Design Brief

  1. 1. VeggiTop A conceptual design by Kristy Allenby & Marcus Catsouphes Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Design Challenge Encourage vegetable eating business school grad students to eat more of them over 5 days
  2. 2. VeggiTop <ul><li>Persuasive Purpose </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase graduate business school students’ vegetable consumption by changing their computers’ desktop background for 5 days </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu <ul><li>Industrial Design </li></ul>+ =
  3. 3. Our Users Are <ul><ul><li>Business school grad students who… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Already like vegetables </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Want to increase consumption of vegetables </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Own personal computers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Have habits of doing work every day at their desks </li></ul></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  4. 4. How it works… Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Flexing His Behavior: Every time Matt sees the desktop image during the week, he eats a vegetable from his bowl. Tracking Behavior: Each night for 5 days, Matt receives a text asking how many extra veggies he ate. He replies back to the text message. Setting Up the Cue: He sets the photo as his computer’s desktop background. Increasing Ability: Matt makes sure he has his favorite veggies on hand. He keeps a bowl of his favorite veggie on his desk next to his computer. Following Up: One week later, Matt receives an email survey asking him some questions about the intervention’s effectiveness Signing Up: Matt, a grad student, receives an email on Monday morning with a picture attached. The email explains that he should eat a vegetable each time he sees the picture on his desktop for the next 5 days.
  5. 5. Prototype of VeggiTop <ul><ul><li>We provide participants a chance to choose the desktop photos they like best. Some examples: </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  6. 6. Features/Functionality <ul><ul><li>Participants choose the image they feel will best motivate them, and they set it as their desktop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Participants place a bowl of vegetables next to their computers, so they are easily accessible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Progress is reported nightly via text message </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  7. 7. Theoretical Justifications <ul><ul><li>Our main research question is to find the simplest behavior that matters. Since these are flex behaviors , we are hypothesizing that a very small cue may encourage the desired result </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This design attempts to “piggy back” an increased vegetable consumption habit on business school students’ extensive daily computer usage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Because business school students sees their computers’ desktop background multiple times per day, the cue can be repeated a lot </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  8. 8. Results of User Testing <ul><ul><li>Forthcoming : ) </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  9. 9. Shortcomings of Design <ul><ul><li>Unclear if the desktop will become “stale” after 5 days </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Will the cue of seeing the new picture be “hot” enough a trigger? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do people want vegetables sitting on their desks all day? </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  10. 10. Expansion - What else is possible? <ul><ul><li>If this works… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>We’ll have a clear indication that a very small behavior change can lead to formation of a new health habit </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This could be easily expanded to allow many people to download backgrounds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Users could potentially be cued to refresh the background periodically, or perhaps even have software written that does a refresh automatically </li></ul></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  11. 11. Next Steps in Design Process <ul><ul><li>Develop instructions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure participants have a week’s worth of vegetables </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deploy the pilot </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu

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