READING SKILLS 1 Developing efficiency
The problem with reading <ul><li>What do you want to achieve when you read? </li></ul><ul><li>What makes reading difficult...
Self evaluation:  Do any of these apply to you? <ul><li>Do you read advanced texts infrequently? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you ...
What is involved in reading? READING  Vocabulary Content knowledge Reading well (with understanding-  Effective reading) R...
Eye movements <ul><li>What happens when you read a paragraph?  </li></ul><ul><li>How do your eyes move to take in the text...
Fixations <ul><li>In reality, of course, eye movements across a line of text are not smooth.  </li></ul><ul><li>Slow reade...
Activity : Clustering/chunking <ul><li>Clustering  is grouping words into  meaningful  clumps or chunks of two or  </li></...
Three Eye Movement Patterns This person  is looking at every word, one at a time.  This person is still looking at every w...
Activity: Clustering/Chunking <ul><li>“ The art of becoming wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.“ -William James <...
Activity: Clustering-second reading <ul><li>How much  |  of what we read  |  do we remember?  |  Not a lot, I think. </li>...
BUT... <ul><li>It’s NOT all about speed .  </li></ul><ul><li>Your first aim should be to  read well.   </li></ul><ul><li>(...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Reading Skills 1 A

751 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
751
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
35
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Reading Skills 1 A

  1. 1. READING SKILLS 1 Developing efficiency
  2. 2. The problem with reading <ul><li>What do you want to achieve when you read? </li></ul><ul><li>What makes reading difficult for you? </li></ul><ul><li>What strategies do you use to get the most out of your reading? </li></ul>
  3. 3. Self evaluation: Do any of these apply to you? <ul><li>Do you read advanced texts infrequently? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you track with your finger along the line? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you read aloud under your breath? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you start reading before you have worked out what you need to know, or what you are looking for? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you keep checking back along the line, re-reading what you have just read? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you read difficult sections before you have worked out the general gist of the text? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you find that the words seem to jump up off the page or that the text moves or glares? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you remember what you have read? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you an active reader? How do you engage with the text (i.e. How you do check your understanding and record important aspects for review/recall later?) </li></ul><ul><li>(from: The Study Skills Handbook by Sara Cottrell, 1999) </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is involved in reading? READING Vocabulary Content knowledge Reading well (with understanding- Effective reading) Reading fast (Efficient reading) Understandingtext type and language features Understanding text structure (cohesion and syntax) Purpose
  5. 5. Eye movements <ul><li>What happens when you read a paragraph? </li></ul><ul><li>How do your eyes move to take in the text? </li></ul><ul><li>How long does it take you to read one line of text? </li></ul><ul><li>Do your eyes move in a continuous straight line across the text, like this: </li></ul>
  6. 6. Fixations <ul><li>In reality, of course, eye movements across a line of text are not smooth. </li></ul><ul><li>Slow readers take in one word at a time; that is, the number of ‘fixations’ or stops/pauses is much higher than for fast readers. Fast readers take in groups of words (clustering) at a time. </li></ul><ul><li>Slow readers may also lose concentration and wander to other parts of the text. </li></ul><ul><li>Slow readers may also back track and re-read something to check understanding or the meaning of an unfamiliar word. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Activity : Clustering/chunking <ul><li>Clustering is grouping words into meaningful clumps or chunks of two or </li></ul><ul><li>five words, which is something the human eye can take in at one go or </li></ul><ul><li>‘ fixation’. The eye can bounce from one group to the next, picking up the </li></ul><ul><li>sense from clusters of words, or rather than just looking at every single </li></ul><ul><li>word. </li></ul><ul><li>Learning to read in clusters of words takes practice, but it can speed </li></ul><ul><li>up your reading considerably. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Three Eye Movement Patterns This person is looking at every word, one at a time. This person is still looking at every word, but in groups This person ‘notices” only a few key words and does so by reading horizontally and vertically at the same time The smart reader is one who actually uses all three patterns, using the third technique to scan the entire book or chapter, and then coming back and using some combination of the first two techniques to further explore the sections of most relevance.
  9. 9. Activity: Clustering/Chunking <ul><li>“ The art of becoming wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.“ -William James </li></ul><ul><li>[The following activity is adapted from Learning Development Services, University of Sunderland, (1999): Effective learning programme. 2 nd ed.] </li></ul><ul><li>Read the passage below, and time how long it takes Time: ____ </li></ul><ul><li>How much of what we read do we remember? Not a lot, I think. It would be a bit awkward if we remembered everything we saw in the newspapers, on television screens, in books, and so on. We’d know so much that when it came to answering any question, we wouldn’t know where to start! </li></ul><ul><li>Reading can be a pleasurable activity. It can be relaxing as well as stimulating. Reading something you’re not really interested in, however, can be boring and frustrating. And if you’re studying, you’re certain to read at least some things you don’t like much. Left to instinct, mot of use tend to read rather passively. This is partly because we don’t usually expect an imminent quiz on what we’ve just finished reading. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Activity: Clustering-second reading <ul><li>How much | of what we read | do we remember? | Not a lot, I think. </li></ul><ul><li>It would be | a bit awkward | if we remembered | everything we saw in newspapers, on television screens, | in books, | and so on. | We’d know so much | that when it came to | answering any question, | we wouldn’t know | where to start! | </li></ul><ul><li>Reading can be | a pleasurable activity. | It can be relaxing | as well as stimulating. | Reading something | you’re not really interested in, | however, can be boring and frustrating. | And if you’re studying, | you’re certain | to need to read | at least some things | you don’t like much. | Left to instinct, most of us tend to read rather passively. | This is partly because | we don’t usually expect | an imminent quiz | on what we’ve | just finished reading. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Time: ___________ </li></ul><ul><li>Did you find this passage easier or quicker to read? </li></ul><ul><li>   </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  11. 11. BUT... <ul><li>It’s NOT all about speed . </li></ul><ul><li>Your first aim should be to read well. </li></ul><ul><li>( read with understanding) </li></ul><ul><li>Speed without comprehension is a futile exercise. </li></ul><ul><li>Learn some strategies to read more effectively. </li></ul><ul><li>Now click on to Reading Skills 2 to learn some effective reading strategies to get the most out of your reading for study purposes. </li></ul>

×