Captain Kappa and his Kappanese Ways<br />Marcus Jones<br />CMLIT 400U<br />October 29, 2009<br />
RyūnosukeAkutagawa<br /><ul><li> Born on March 1st, 1892 in a part of Tokyo
Third child of the family, and the only son to be born
His mother Fuku had a mental breakdown after his birth and he was adopted by his uncle
Studied English literature with a focus on poetry at the Imperial University of Tokyo
became a disciple of NatsumeSōseki, a noted literary figure of the times
with Sōseki’s guidance (and goading), Akutagawa kept publishing and working on his short stories</li></li></ul><li>Works a...
Kappa in Mythology<br />Kappa live all over Japan in the various bodies of water, and are considered Water Dieties<br />Th...
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Captain Kappa And His Kappanese Ways

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Ryunosuke Akutagawa and his story Kappa

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Captain Kappa And His Kappanese Ways

  1. 1. Captain Kappa and his Kappanese Ways<br />Marcus Jones<br />CMLIT 400U<br />October 29, 2009<br />
  2. 2. RyūnosukeAkutagawa<br /><ul><li> Born on March 1st, 1892 in a part of Tokyo
  3. 3. Third child of the family, and the only son to be born
  4. 4. His mother Fuku had a mental breakdown after his birth and he was adopted by his uncle
  5. 5. Studied English literature with a focus on poetry at the Imperial University of Tokyo
  6. 6. became a disciple of NatsumeSōseki, a noted literary figure of the times
  7. 7. with Sōseki’s guidance (and goading), Akutagawa kept publishing and working on his short stories</li></li></ul><li>Works and Styles<br />His Works<br />Published solely short stories, where he earned the nickname “Father of Japanese short story writing”<br />Has had over 150 total stories published through various collections, literary magazines, and publishers<br />His most famous works include Rashōmon and Napa no Naka (“In the Grove”)<br />Some of his work have been made into major movie productions<br />And his Styles<br />Uses many traditional Japanese stories, myths, and their themes to create new stories<br />Many also contain a psychological aspect – this increased as he grew older<br />Very realistic style of writing, showing the world<br />
  8. 8. Kappa in Mythology<br />Kappa live all over Japan in the various bodies of water, and are considered Water Dieties<br />Their appearance is an amalgam of many different creatures<br />Known especially for the saucer-like indent on the head, which is full of water<br />They are seen as devilish imps and tricksters sometimes<br />They are supposed to be very pride filled and honor-bound creatures as well<br />A fairly creepy life-like representation of a Kappa<br />
  9. 9. Kappa and Gulliver’s Travels<br />Kappa<br />Patient 23, magically finds himself in Kappaland<br />Spends much time there, learning about their world<br />An incredibly similar yet (to humans) strange and seemingly dysfunctional society is presented to the Narrator, who takes the time to compare the two<br />Humans and Kappas are often drawn into comparisons, and humans are constantly called “not highly as evolved as the Kappa”<br />Story stands as a critique on Japanese society and its ways<br />Gulliver’s Travels<br />Part IV – Gulliver’s Voyage to Houyhnhnms, a land where Yahoos (a form of de-evolved humans) and a version of intelligent horses exist<br />Houyhnhnm is to stand for “the perfection of nature,” showing their belief that they are higher in the evolutionary chain than humans<br />Gulliver witnesses another society unlike our own and continually compares it to the yahoos on the island and his own native England<br />The entirety of the book stands as a critique on Western society<br />
  10. 10. Kappa’s Relation to Japanese Society<br />Akutagawa uses Kappa to critique many parts of Japanese society in different regards, leaving almost no stone untouched in his efforts<br />Religion<br />Kappaland’sViverism stands as a religion of living (including sex and drinking). The origin story differs from most major religions – Woman was created first.<br />The Great Tabernacle of Viverism also stands as the grandest creation in Kappaland, similar to the importance of religion in the real world<br />Love<br />Often initiated by the woman, she can either chase the man down (nearly killing him) or try to create a great lust in the man<br />Law and Punishment<br />Law stands as flexible, but hardly anyone is seen to ever been punished. They speak of an electric chair but Pep the Judge makes a point how “we reserve it for very rare and exceptional circumstances.”<br />
  11. 11. Kappa’s Relation to Japanese Society Continued<br />War<br />War in itself was its own spectacle, and this makes reference to the Chinese occupation. As with Japan, the Kappa lose about 369,00 (Japan had estimated about 300,000 troops lost when in fact it was much higher) and the Kappa crush the entire Otter society<br />Spirituality<br />Tok comes back and holds an impromptu conference with a host of news reporters and others. He notes how peaceful the other world is and how everyone, including those that died by suicide, all “live” peaceful ghost existences. Thought and philosophy continue in the next plane as well.<br />
  12. 12. Bibliography<br />Heenan, Patrick. &quot;AkutagawaRyūnosuke.&quot; Reference Guide to World Literature. Ed. Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast. Vol. 1: Authors. 3rd ed. Detroit: St. James Press, 2003. 16-18. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Gale. CIC Penn State University. 29 Oct. 2009 &lt;http://go.galegroup.com.ezaccess.libraries.psu.edu/ps/start.do?p=GVRL&u=psucic&gt;.<br />AkutagawaRyunosuke photo. Commons.wikimedia.org. 1 Aug. 2009. 28 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Akutagawa_Ryunosuke_photo.jpg&gt;<br />Books and Authors. Petri Liukkonen. 2008. 28 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/akuta.htm&gt;<br />Bookrags.com. 28 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.bookrags.com/biography/ryunosuke-akutagawa/&gt;<br />“Japanese Myths and Mythical Creatures Series: Kappa.” Turning Iwatean. 21 April 2009. 27 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://turning-iwatean.blogspot.com/2009/04/japanese-myths-and-mythical-creatures.html&gt;<br />

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