Lmagpiong Food Stuff Finalversion0520

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Lmagpiong Food Stuff Finalversion0520

  1. 1. Food Stuff: Pet Food Storage FOR USE WITHIN AN ANIMAL SHELTER D+I 505.2 SPRING 2008 By LARICE MAGPIONG
  2. 2. THE IDEA
  3. 3. BACKGROUND A healthy diet is a vital part of rehabilitating shelter animals. Animals are stressed, lack exercise, and tend to gain weight in a shelter environment. Food storage issues with in an animal shelter are linked with improper feeding, contamination, and high costs. The Berkeley East Bay Humane Society feels that their facility has in place a food storage system with many short comings. In 1927 three citizens, concerned about homeless animals in Alameda County, formed the “Animal Rescue Haven.” In 1957 the Animal Rescue Haven was renamed the Berkeley-East Bay Humane Society. The Berkeley East Bay Humane Society (BEBHS) is a private, nonprofit organization with an animal shelter and veterinary hospital located in Berkeley, California. Serving Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, and Marin Counties, the BEBHS offer animal adoption services, canine training classes, humane education, and animal care.
  4. 4. PROBLEM & PURPOSE Statement of the Problem Due to high costs and limited organizing options the BEBHS lacks an efficient cat and dog food storage system. Purpose of the Study To isolate the problems in the existing cat and dog food storage system at the BEBHS and determine the human factors, cost- effective organizing solutions, and environmentally sustainable materials in order to develop a product solution with improved function, ease of use, and appeal to the widest range of people.
  5. 5. SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY This study focuses on the human needs of shelter workers that traditionally have been over looked in shelter design. By improving the function of the current food storage method, the study will have a positive effect on the shelter animals and the people who care for them. By considering recycled materials for manufacturing, the study shows concern for the environment and a sustainable approach to product design.
  6. 6. Hypothesis 1 An easily usable measuring device for food distribution will increase efficiency. Hypothesis 2 Secure closing and easy to refill features will reduce food contamination. Hypothesis 3 Color and other indicators will help make feeding information clear and food types visible. Hypothesis 4 Materials for manufacturing can be recycled, recyclable, low cost, and make the product more desirable.
  7. 7. RESEARCH
  8. 8. USER’S SAID: “Rotating the food, ensuring enough bins are available is a problem.” “Our cat food bin is quite tall and the bags of food can be rather heavy.” “Rotation of heavy items is difficult due to small space and construction of storage closets and shelves.” “……scoopers regularly get lost in the buckets of food and you have to fish them out, if someone pours food over them accidentally.” “The food storage system, in general, seems to be a large attraction for rodents.” “….we have so many varied types of food it is difficult to store them all in cheap, organized, rodent-proof containers.” “Dumping heavy bags into tall bins can be difficult. Plus, when the food is low, it's hard to get into the bin to get the food out.”
  9. 9. USER’S SAID: “Rotating the food, ensuring enough bins are available is a problem.” “Our cat food bin is quite tall and the bags of food can be rather heavy.” “Rotation of heavy items is difficult due to small space and construction of storage closets and shelves.” “……scoopers regularly get lost in the buckets of food and you have to fish them out, if someone pours food over them accidentally.” “The food storage system, in general, seems to be a large attraction for rodents.” “….we have so many varied types of food it is difficult to store them all in cheap, organized, rodent-proof containers.” “Dumping heavy bags into tall bins can be difficult. Plus, when the food is low, it's hard to get into the bin to get the food out.”
  10. 10. USER’S SAID: “Rotating the food, ensuring enough bins are available is a problem.” “Our cat food bin is quite tall and the bags of food can be rather heavy.” “Rotation of heavy items is difficult due to small space and construction of storage closets and shelves.” “……scoopers regularly get lost in the buckets of food and you have to fish them out, if someone pours food over them accidentally.” “The food storage system, in general, seems to be a large attraction for rodents.” “….we have so many varied types of food it is difficult to store them all in cheap, organized, rodent-proof containers.” “Dumping heavy bags into tall bins can be difficult. Plus, when the food is low, it's hard to get into the bin to get the food out.”
  11. 11. USER’S SAID: “Rotating the food, ensuring enough bins are available is a problem.” “Our cat food bin is quite tall and the bags of food can be rather heavy.” “Rotation of heavy items is difficult due to small space and construction of storage closets and shelves.” “……scoopers regularly get lost in the buckets of food and you have to fish them out, if someone pours food over them accidentally.” “The food storage system, in general, seems to be a large attraction for rodents.” “….we have so many varied types of food it is difficult to store them all in cheap, organized, rodent-proof containers.” “Dumping heavy bags into tall bins can be difficult. Plus, when the food is low, it's hard to get into the bin to get the food out.”
  12. 12. USER’S SAID: “Rotating the food, ensuring enough bins are available is a problem.” “Our cat food bin is quite tall and the bags of food can be rather heavy.” “Rotation of heavy items is difficult due to small space and construction of storage closets and shelves.” “……scoopers regularly get lost in the buckets of food and you have to fish them out, if someone pours food over them accidentally.” “The food storage system, in general, seems to be a large attraction for rodents.” “….we have so many varied types of food it is difficult to store them all in cheap, organized, rodent-proof containers.” “Dumping heavy bags into tall bins can be difficult. Plus, when the food is low, it's hard to get into the bin to get the food out.”
  13. 13. USER’S SAID: “Rotating the food, ensuring enough bins are available is a problem.” “Our cat food bin is quite tall and the bags of food can be rather heavy.” “Rotation of heavy items is difficult due to small space and construction of storage closets and shelves.” “……scoopers regularly get lost in the buckets of food and you have to fish them out, if someone pours food over them accidentally.” “The food storage system, in general, seems to be a large attraction for rodents.” “….we have so many varied types of food it is difficult to store them all in cheap, organized, rodent-proof containers.” “Dumping heavy bags into tall bins can be difficult. Plus, when the food is low, it's hard to get into the bin to get the food out.”
  14. 14. USER’S SAID: “Rotating the food, ensuring enough bins are available is a problem.” “Our cat food bin is quite tall and the bags of food can be rather heavy.” “Rotation of heavy items is difficult due to small space and construction of storage closets and shelves.” “……scoopers regularly get lost in the buckets of food and you have to fish them out, if someone pours food over them accidentally.” “The food storage system, in general, seems to be a large attraction for rodents.” “….we have so many varied types of food it is difficult to store them all in cheap, organized, rodent-proof containers.” “Dumping heavy bags into tall bins can be difficult. Plus, when the food is low, it's hard to get into the bin to get the food out.”
  15. 15. Comparative Studies: FACTORS OF A USER User Tasks include: User Needs: • Restocking food •Minimal grooves, seems, and parts are •Organizing food preferable to reduce difficulty in cleaning. • Measuring food • Cleaning food containers • Materials must be durable, water-proof, and • Following dietary requirements resistant to risk of harboring diseases. Potential User Errors: •Parts should be inter-changeable; shelter workers need to be able to ‘fix it themselves.’ •Forgetting to close a lid or bag •Reaching and bending incorrectly •Cost-effective and affordable solution. •Confusion caused by similarity in food bags •Rotating food incorrectly causing food to go stale and mold to build-up
  16. 16. Comparative Studies: LIDS • There is a Lack of easy to open, airtight lids. • Lids loosen with routine opening/ closing. • Loose lids have potential to attract rodents and insects easily. • Separate lids end up on the floor and countertops taking up useful space. • Unscrew lids are potentially damaging to the wrist of the user because they are very hard to open. • Attached lids required a considerable amount of strength to open, as well.
  17. 17. Comparative Studies: FO OD ROTATION • Current food storage systems do not provide proper food rotation. • Food left to long at the bottom of a bin is a problem. • Small containers offer food rotation, but need constant refilling and are not practical.
  18. 18. Product Reviews: DISPENSERS • Dispensing reduces routine opening and closing of lids that cause quick wear-and-tear. • Dispensing eliminates manual scooping that causes stress on a person’s back from reaching as containers empty. • A dispenser can be simple to operate and designed to measure food in increments. • A proper compartment size can be designed to accommodate proper amounts of food a shelter uses and needs.
  19. 19. Designer Comparative Studies Opportunity Gap Large Storage Limited Storage Conventional
  20. 20. PANEL OF EXPERTS Alex Militar key informants at main site regarding Operation Manager operational problems within the shelter, BEBHS, Berkeley, CA feeding program guidelines, shelter standards. Several interviews and Marc Slater observational studies conducted. Shelter Manager BEBHS, Berkeley, CA Key informant to gain access to the site. Linda Gonzales Conducted comparative study at the Shelters Manager Oakland shelter facility. Interview Oakland – Tri-Valley , Dublin, CA addressed issues of pest problems, proper food storage, and cost issues. Key informant to gain access to the site. Lisa Gunter Interview addressed issues concerned Dog Attendant Supervisor with proper food storage and concerns San Francisco, CA with limited space.
  21. 21. DEVELOPMENT
  22. 22. FORM STUDIES I N S P I R AT I O N
  23. 23. CONCEPT 1: Modular Wheeled cart
  24. 24. CONCEPT 2: Pedal-Lift Container
  25. 25. CONCEPT 3: Food Station
  26. 26. CONCEPT 4: FOOD WHEEL
  27. 27. CONCEPT 5: Dispenser
  28. 28. CONCEPT REFINEMENT
  29. 29. CONCEPT REFINEMENT
  30. 30. Problem 1: The shelter buys food in bulk. It was upsetting to Holly to find that after workers stock specialized foods, rodents had gnawed a hole in the bottom of the bags overnight. Walking HOLLY’S into the kitchen to find a puddle of kibble on the floor, and SCENARIO have to discard it because it was contaminated, was like paying for a bag of food twice. Problem 2: As Shelter Manager Holly had also been working with the staff Holly so that all animals were getting a measured amount of the right food. The single biggest cause of diarrhea in shelters is • BEBHS Shelter Operations Manager overfeeding. It was brought to her attention that visiting • “It is my goal to make adopters were put off by the smell and mess among certain sure that day-to-day animals. we are operating a safe facility.” Problem Solved: Testing new containers, she purchased several FOOD STUFF pet food dispensers to store specialized foods. Holly finds the containers affordable, she likes the unique, rodent resistant shape, and with controlled dispensing, workers are better Holly finds the containers affordable, she likes the at accurately portioning food. She has seen an immediate unique, rodent resistant shape, and with reduction in food costs and volume of fecal matter– a fact controlled dispensing, workers are better at particularly important to minimizing shelter waste. accurately portioning food.
  31. 31. The Problem: From time to time, Claude cleans out the steel bins and other food containers that get greasy inside from regular use. It is a CLAUDE’S physically demanding task and Claude takes the work load SCENARIO upon himself since other workers are not able to do so themselves. It seems almost impossible to clean around every nook-and-cranny. Its not at all possible to wash out the old steel bins with hot soap and water. Problem Solved: Claude Claude notices new food dispensers in assorted colors. He • BEBHS Kennel decides to clean the green one out before refilling. He likes Attendant the round design that is equipped to suspend from the wall. Without the weight of the food, he finds the container • “It is my goal to extremely light weight. He is surprised by the strength and uphold the shelter's thickness of the plastic. responsibility to care humanely for animals.” To clean is simple. Claude unscrews the cap and disassemble the handle to lift the blade out of place. There are minimal grooves and seems and Claude is able to slide the Blades from its shaft and clean every nook-and-cranny. And, he especially likes how the opening at the top and underside of the container make air drying quick and easy. There are minimal grooves and seems and Claude feels that his cleaning duties have been washed away. Claude is able to slide the Blades from its With the comfort and ease of removing and replacing the shaft and clean every Nook and Cranny. parts, he is assured other workers will be safe from any harm once caused by cleaning heavy , hard to reach containers.
  32. 32. Dana volunteers at the BEBHS as a cat Socializer. Every Sunday, she spends the afternoon with shelter cats and kittens in the Catopia. Her main responsibility is giving them the love and attention they need as they wait for a new home. DANA’S The Problem: SCENARIO Dana knows the morning routine of feeding can last all day. She is aware of how confusing it can be with similar looking food bags and food piled into the steel bin containers. Volunteers are always invited to help out with this routine, but Dana prefers to assist in other ways like providing helpful information to adopters. Dana However, on a particular Sunday the BEBHS is short staffed and Dana decides that she will fill in to prepare meals. She is reminded of the • BEBHS Volunteer time she made the awful mistake of feeding Jimmy, a diabetic cat, the wrong food. She had mistaken the packaging and has felt • “It is my goal to horrible ever since Jimmy bloated up like a balloon. make sure every animal here knows Problem Solved: that they are loved.” Dana notices new food dispensers in assorted colors. She is surprised how uncluttered the feed room looks. She looks to the feeding board, as she normally would, and quickly notices the reference of each color container matching a special diet. Dana is confident she knows exactly where to find the right prescription food. Containers are color coded and the information can be found written on the feeding board. She knows now that diabetic kibble is always in the blue container. For a volunteer who visits the shelter only once a week, Dana feels like Dana is confident she knows exactly were to find she knows her way around the kitchen. She no longer feels as if she has to hunt for food and scoops. She doesn’t have to worry about the right specialized foods. Containers are color making a mistake and giving old Jimmy the wrong food again. coded and the information can be found written Instead, she prepares meals quickly and correctly and has more on the feeding board. time to provide shelter cats with the love they need.
  33. 33. Meeting environmental challenges: Mary takes responsibility to find ways she can make shelter work-life more environmentally friendly. Staff appreciate MARY’ the small steps Mary has taken to produce the big, SCENARIO sustainable changes they have seen implemented throughout the facility. Mary finds the new food dispensers particularly cool since they Mary are made of 100% recycled plastic from recycled milk • BEBHS Veterinarian containers known as HDPE (high-density Polyethelene). • “It is my goal to She is ready to get the word out and tell all her friends. provide the best preventive healthcare to animals living in the Mary is a well known veterinarian throughout the animal shelter.” welfare community. She is spreading the word about the new FOOD STUFF pet food dispensers. She is informing her colleagues that the BEBHS has tested the safety of the containers and not only are they manufactured to meet FDA regulations for food contact, FOOD STUFF containers Mary finds the new food dispensers particularly are BPA (Bisphenol-A) free. cool since they are made of 100% recycled plastic from recycled milk containers known as HDPE.
  34. 34. DESIGN GUIDE Design Solution Safe and easy to use, with user–centered features to meet the immediate needs of shelter workers. This pet food storage system aims to prevent food contamination and keep food fresh for longer periods of time. Reasons why the BEBHS should Pursue this product FOOD STUFF offers controlled dispensing and feeding color system options as simple solutions to organizing and safely storing a variety of specialized pet foods within an animal shelter.
  35. 35. DESIGN GUIDE Design Objectives Controlled dispensing will reduce wear-and-tear on container lids that would normally require routine, daily opening and closing to access food. User will have freedom to interchange parts and create a color system that corresponds with behavioral and feeding needs. Components should be: Airtight Pest proof Light weight Simple to maintain Comfortable to use Modular Criteria The 7 Principles of Universal Design will be followed to evaluate the development of human factor features. U.C. Davis School of Veterinary Medicine nutritional feeding protocol will be followed to ensure product is safe for pet food contact. Cradle-to-Cradle Design Protocols will be used to access product eco-effeciency.
  36. 36. DESIGN GUIDE User & Environmental need it fulfills Funding Especially in the non-profit sector, purchasing decisions are slow, spending is often restricted so, the market price must be affordable. Space Struggling with limited room for sufficient size bins is common. Maintaining several different food storage locations throughout a shelter is a reality. Kitchen A facility may have up to three separate kitchens where workers prepare food. Hospital Sick and injured animals under constant veterinary care are fed in an infirmary. Quarantine Animals that have been exposed to contagious or infectious diseases are fed in detainment. Animal Population Animal census widely varies from shelter-to-shelter and animals range in size.
  37. 37. DESIGN GUIDE Feature Specification Taking into consideration user frustrations, features are designed with improved function, usability, and durability. System components are ergonomics and have a modern appeal. Container is available in different colors to meet needs of changing shelter population. Parts disassemble to clean and air dry quickly, a fact very important to shelter workers. Features parts include: • Lid, deflector, container, magnetic wall bracket, cap, blades, shaft, tap. • Attached, airtight lid that swings side-to-side when refilling and can be detached when it is time to clean. • Inside deflector to better distribute weight of 25 lbs. of food. • 1/8” thick round plastic shell with magnetic backing. • Magnetic wall bracket to hold container that requires secure mounting. • Removable blades (4) to provide accurate measured portioning. • Rotating tap moves in either direction that is most comfortable to the user.
  38. 38. DESIGN GUIDE Risk Factors • Components are not rigid enough and may break easily. • Recycled materials are not safe for food contact. • Manufacturing processes negatively impact the environment. • Difficult to store more than one container side-by-side. • Rotating tap does not measure food in proper increments.
  39. 39. THE DESIGN
  40. 40. PRELIMANARY REFINED SKETCHES TOP RIGHT FRONT
  41. 41. PRELIMANARY REFINED SKETCHES: USER FEEDBACK TOP Should consider screw like blade for dispensing. RIGHT FRONT Deflector for reducing Modification of backing not an ‘L’, but weight of food on rather ‘Z’ shaped to hold weight. better. blade.
  42. 42. USER FEEDBACK “Will the blade jam from weight of 50 lbs. of food resting on top of it? “My only concern is trying to store several containers side-by-side?” “Pleasing design , but would like to have option to see when food is low, better visibility to know when to refill.” “Really like that blades come apart for easy cleaning, but rigid materials may break easily and should be simple to replace.” “It might be a good idea to think through options for lowering to make more ergonomic for workers when refilling.”
  43. 43. USER FEEDBACK “Will the blade jam from weight of 50 lbs. of food resting on top of it? “My only concern is trying to store several containers side-by-side?” “Pleasing design , but would like to have option to see when food is low, better visibility to know when to refill.” “Really like that blades come apart for easy cleaning, but rigid materials may break easily and should be simple to replace.” “It might be a good idea to think through options for lowering to make more ergonomic for workers when refilling.”
  44. 44. USER FEEDBACK “Will the blade jam from weight of 50 lbs. of food resting on top of it? “My only concern is trying to store several containers side-by-side?” “Pleasing design , but would like to have option to see when food is low, better visibility to know when to refill.” “Really like that blades come apart for easy cleaning, but rigid materials may break easily and should be simple to replace.” “It might be a good idea to think through options for lowering to make more ergonomic for workers when refilling.”
  45. 45. USER FEEDBACK “Will the blade jam from weight of 50 lbs. of food resting on top of it? “My only concern is trying to store several containers side-by-side?” “Pleasing design , but would like to have option to see when food is low, better visibility to know when to refill.” “Really like that blades come apart for easy cleaning, but rigid materials may break easily and should be simple to replace.” “It might be a good idea to think through options for lowering to make more ergonomic for workers when refilling.”
  46. 46. USER FEEDBACK “Will the blade jam from weight of 50 lbs. of food resting on top of it? “My only concern is trying to store several containers side-by-side?” “Pleasing design , but would like to have option to see when food is low, better visibility to know when to refill.” “Really like that blades come apart for easy cleaning, but rigid materials may break easily and should be simple to replace.” “It might be a good idea to think through options for lowering to make more ergonomic for workers when refilling.”
  47. 47. FINAL CONCEPT
  48. 48. FINAL CONCEPT TO BE TESTED
  49. 49. FINAL CONCEPT TO BE TESTED
  50. 50. A S S EMBL I NG & D I S A S S EMBLY 1 2 3 LID 1 4 2 DEFLECTOR 3 CONTAINER 5 4 MAGNETIC WALL BRACKET 5 CAP 6 REMOVABLE BLADES 6 7 SHAFT 7 8 TAP 8
  51. 51. F E AT U R E S Hinged Lid Lift Flap COMPARTMENT Magnetic Backing Ergonomic Tap Bottom Dispenser
  52. 52. F E AT U R E S (Actual Size) Maximum kibble is 7/8” Diameter Maximum weight 25 lbs.
  53. 53. COLOR SAMPLE 17 inches 13inches
  54. 54. I N S T A L L AT I O N •Magnetic Wall Bracket must be mounted securely. •Use appropriate fixings for wall construction. 17 inches •Spring toggle recommended for shallow wall.
  55. 55. W H AT’ S N E X T . . . . . . . . •Locate manufacturer to produce a working prototype. •Test prototype with end-users. •Testing function of the blade. •Testing weight capacity of deflector. •Continued research of environmentally safe materials and processes. •Develop more sophisticated feeding color system. •Incorporate tactile and sound sensory.
  56. 56. INTO THE FUTURE
  57. 57. THANK YOU FOOD STUFF

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