Ionian University         Laboratory of Digital Libraries and Electronic Publishing              Department of Archives an...
Session OverviewLiterature ReviewPrevious Researches: implementation surveysMethodologyObjectives of the StudyResultsSome ...
Literature ReviewCollection Development Policy  “Current and planned GIS activities in an institution will strongly influe...
Literature Review (2/2)GIS Services in Academic Libraries  “GIS are needed to manage the extremely large quantities of dig...
Implementation Surveys (1)121 ARL members libraries (1999)72/121 (60%) returned64/121 (89%) provide GIS services 94/121 (7...
Implementation Surveys (2)  21 libraries re‐surveyed (2004)11/21 respond (52% return rate)9/11 continued GIS services (82%...
Methodology 133 US Academic Libraries’ websites examined                      WHY?academic libraries supports a wide rang...
The Objectives of the study are to determine:1)How many libraries provides GIS services?2)How many libraries provides coll...
Results (1/5)      1)How many libraries provide GIS services?95/133 (72%) provides GIS services to their patrons17/133 (13...
Results (2/5)2)How many libraries provide collection development policy for  their geospatial collections?13 /95 had a geo...
Results (3/5)3)What kind of information do they offer? (1/2) ESRI data                               National and internat...
Results (3/5)3)What kind of information do they offer? (2/2)   Hydrologic, hypsographic,                Education statisti...
Results (4/5)4)What kind of infrastructure provide to their patrons?                         Hardware46/95 (48%) Libraries...
Results (4/5)4)What kind of infrastructure provide to their patrons?                        Software55/95  (58%) use ArcGI...
Results (5/5)5)What kind of services offer to their patrons?  Training programmes: 48/95 (51%)  Information about software...
Some other characteristicsAmong 95 Libraries with GIS services: 9/95 (9.5%) didn’t serve familiar departments 11/95 (12%) ...
Conclusions (1/2)95 US Academic Libraries established GIS services & they offer avariety of local, national and internatio...
Conclusions (2/2)64 provide local access to data9 implement GIS services without serving familiar departments in their uni...
Researches comparisonResearch                       Percentage of GIS                                implementation in lib...
Limitations of the studyDeterminate library type (academic) Specific geographic region (USA)They were not chosen by any sc...
In spite the previous difficulties the survey raises certain questions:  What are the main characteristics of the existing...
Future WorkExpand the research: in other types of libraries (public, college) and in other regions (Europe, Australia, G...
BIBLIOGRAPHYAbresch, J.e.a (2008) Integrating GIS into Library Services: a guide for academic libraries. Hershey: Informat...
BIBLIOGRAPHYGood, H. N. (2009) “Trend of GIS services in US academic libraries: from comparison of past surveys and curren...
Thank you!!1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation  Management, March 30-31, 2011                25
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Geographic collections development policies and GIS services: a research in US academic libraries' websites

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Presentation in the First Workshop on Digital Information Management. The workshop is organized by the Laboratory on Digital Libraries and Electronic Publication, Department of Archives and Library Sciences, Ionian University, Greece and aims to create a venue for unfolding research activity on the general field of Information Science. The workshop features sessions for the dissemination of the research results of the Laboratory members, as well as tutorial sessions on interesting issues.

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Geographic collections development policies and GIS services: a research in US academic libraries' websites

  1. 1. Ionian University Laboratory of Digital Libraries and Electronic Publishing Department of Archives and Library ScienceGeographic collections development policies and GIS services: a research in US academic libraries’ websites Ifigenia Vardakosta ifigenia@ionio.gr Sarantos Kapidakis sarantos@ionio.gr Laboratory of Digital Libraries and Electronic Publishing Department of Archives and Library Science 1st Workshop on Digital Information Management March 30-31, 2011
  2. 2. Session OverviewLiterature ReviewPrevious Researches: implementation surveysMethodologyObjectives of the StudyResultsSome other characteristicsConclusionsFuture work 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 2
  3. 3. Literature ReviewCollection Development Policy “Current and planned GIS activities in an institution will strongly influence  collection development” (Longstreth, 1995) “Policy questions need to be placed within the context of the move towards  large‐and small‐scale spatial data infrastructures that do, in the end, affect the  developments of geolibraries” (Boxall, 2004) “Regularly assessing and revising policies helps academic libraries adapt GIS  services to strike a balance between ever‐changing needs of users and finite  library staff, equipment and budgetary resources” (Sorice, 2006) «In creating a collection development policy for GIS services, librarians can  incorporate elements of a need assessment into their workflow to help  organize the various types of information elements they collect” (Abresch e.a,  2008, p.213) 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 3
  4. 4. Literature Review (2/2)GIS Services in Academic Libraries “GIS are needed to manage the extremely large quantities of digital  data that are increasingly available for use by research, business and  industry” (Lutz, 1995) “The emergence and widespread application of GIS challenged  librarians to analyze a nontraditional set of user needs and assemble  services that incorporated computer hardware, software, data and training opportunities in new ways” (Argentati, 1997) “Since TIGER files were given to depository libraries, GIS has moved  from being a tool used mostly by map or document libraries, to being  a tool that can be used by reference librarians to meet the needs of  any number of disciplines” (Todd, 2008) “Libraries at the doctoral/research universities offer GIS services almost 90% already, but they need to have a good data collection plan in order to increase users” (Good, 2009) 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 4
  5. 5. Implementation Surveys (1)121 ARL members libraries (1999)72/121 (60%) returned64/121 (89%) provide GIS services 94/121 (78%) use ArcView of ESRI, 38/121 (31%) assist their patrons in using the service (ARL, 1999)138 smaller academic libraries (2001)22/138 (13%): some degree of GIS services27/138 (16%): intention to offer GIS89/138 (64%): no GIS plans (Kinikin & Hench, 2005) 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 5
  6. 6. Implementation Surveys (2) 21 libraries re‐surveyed (2004)11/21 respond (52% return rate)9/11 continued GIS services (82%)2/11 discontinued offering GIS services (Kinikin & Hench, 2005a) 103 academic libraries in Oregon (2006): 31/103 (30%): some degree of GIS services 15/103 (15%): actively considering GIS 57/103 (55%): no GIS plans (Gabaldon & Reppling, 2006)  1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 6
  7. 7. Methodology 133 US Academic Libraries’ websites examined WHY?academic libraries supports a wide range of  communitymore reliance on new technologies quantity of US academic libraries history in the implementation of GIS service’s 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 7
  8. 8. The Objectives of the study are to determine:1)How many libraries provides GIS services?2)How many libraries provides collection development  policy for their geospatial collections to their patrons?3)What kind of information do they offer?4)What kind of infrastructure provide to the public?5)What services do they offer? (user education, assistance,  remote access, guidelines for hardware/software) 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 8
  9. 9. Results (1/5) 1)How many libraries provide GIS services?95/133 (72%) provides GIS services to their patrons17/133 (13%) « « co-operatively or as independent Center or Lab20/133 (15%) do not provide any GIS service Implementation of GIS services no GIS services 16% in co-operation Libr_GIS 13% in co-operation no GIS services Libr_GIS 71% 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 9
  10. 10. Results (2/5)2)How many libraries provide collection development policy for their geospatial collections?13 /95 had a geospatial collection development policy82 /95 did not have any geospatial collection development policy in their webpage for their users GEOSPATIAL COLL.DEV.POLICY 14% Libr.with geospatial coll.dev.pol Libr.that do not mention any coll.dev.pol. 86% 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 10
  11. 11. Results (3/5)3)What kind of information do they offer? (1/2) ESRI data National and international Digital chart of the world datasets Gazetteers Statistical and Geographic Aerial phptographs datasets Orthophotos Data from federal agencies Satellite imagery Local Base Data Census‐related data  (population, age, income,  Thematic Data etc.), Shape files 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 11
  12. 12. Results (3/5)3)What kind of information do they offer? (2/2) Hydrologic, hypsographic, Education statistics,transportation, power, city  Nautical Charts,  and county outlines Business trends Digital numeric and  Universities web sites spatial data sets,  State & regional web sites especially social science  data sets National & world gis sites Indexes Government GIS‐related  sites Labor statistics,  General gis websites Political behavior,  1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 12
  13. 13. Results (4/5)4)What kind of infrastructure provide to their patrons? Hardware46/95 (48%) Libraries provide information about the infrastructure that can be used in the library: Workstations Printers Scanners                            Plotters GPS 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 13
  14. 14. Results (4/5)4)What kind of infrastructure provide to their patrons? Software55/95  (58%) use ArcGIS (ESRI)39/95 (41%) don’t have any info about software1/95 names different software Other software packagesGoogleEarth, GoogleEarthPro, DIVA, GRASS, AutoCAD,  MapWindow, QuantumGIS, Idrisi/Erdas, SPSS 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 14
  15. 15. Results (5/5)5)What kind of services offer to their patrons? Training programmes: 48/95 (51%) Information about software/hardware that can be used  in the library : 42/95 (44%) Guidelines for data/software use : 16/95 (17%) Assistance to users (Ask a Librarian): 73/95 (77%) Data for Local access : 64/95 (67%) 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 15
  16. 16. Some other characteristicsAmong 95 Libraries with GIS services: 9/95 (9.5%) didn’t serve familiar departments 11/95 (12%) refer “GIS Librarian” 55 (58%) were ARL paprticipants 44 (46%) were members of University Consortium of  GIS (UCGIS) 33 (35%) presidents, provosts, and chancellors of  these institutions support Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA) 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 16
  17. 17. Conclusions (1/2)95 US Academic Libraries established GIS services & they offer avariety of local, national and international geospatial data13 provide a geospatial collection development policy46 inform their patrons for the existence infrastructure (in‐door or in the field e.g.GPS)55 use ArcGIS as the main desktop GIS and mapping software package (without excluding the use of open source software for educational purposes or for specific applications)48 incorporate training programmes73 sustain an assistance through the website 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 17
  18. 18. Conclusions (2/2)64 provide local access to data9 implement GIS services without serving familiar departments in their university11 mention “GIS Librarian” 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 18
  19. 19. Researches comparisonResearch Percentage of GIS  implementation in librariesARL (1999) 64/72      (89%)  Kinikin & Hench (2005) 22/138    (20%)Kinikin & Hench (2005a) 9/11        (82%)Gabaldon & Repplinger 31/103    (31%)(2006)Good (2009) ~90% in academic librariesOur research (2011) 95/133    (72%) 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 19
  20. 20. Limitations of the studyDeterminate library type (academic) Specific geographic region (USA)They were not chosen by any scientific meanThe author was the sole researcher  1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 20
  21. 21. In spite the previous difficulties the survey raises certain questions: What are the main characteristics of the existing  geospatial collection development policies? Is there any homogeneity of collection development  policies for geospatial data around the world? Is it finally true that a well established collection  development policy defines the provided services? What about collection development policies for  geospatial repositories? What is the existing situation in Greece? 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 21
  22. 22. Future WorkExpand the research: in other types of libraries (public, college) and in other regions (Europe, Australia, Greece)in geospatial repositoriesDefine a proper methodology Construct a questionnaire 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 22
  23. 23. BIBLIOGRAPHYAbresch, J.e.a (2008) Integrating GIS into Library Services: a guide for academic libraries. Hershey: Information Publishing CompanyBoxall, J.C. (2006) “Advances and Trends in geospatial information accessibility‐Part II: policy dimensions” in Journal of Map and Geography Libraries, 3(1),pp37‐78Argentati, C.D. (1997) ”Expanding horizons for GIS sservices in Academic Libraries” in The Journal of Academic Librarianship, November, 463‐468ARL (1999) “The ARL GIS Literacy Project. Spec Kit 238. [http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED429609.pdf]Gabaldon, C. and Repplinger, J. (2006) “GIS and the academic library: a survey of libraries offering GIS services in two consortia” in Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship, 48, Fall,[ http://www.istl.org/06‐fall/refereed.html ] 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 23
  24. 24. BIBLIOGRAPHYGood, H. N. (2009) “Trend of GIS services in US academic libraries: from comparison of past surveys and current situation of theUniversity of Pittsburgh”in Information Science & Technology Association, 59(11) pp.539‐544Kinikin, J.N. and Hench, K. (2005) “Survey of GIS implementation and use within smaller academic libraries” in Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Kinikin, J.N. and Hench, K. (2005a) “Follow‐up survey of GIS at smaller academic libraries”in Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, SummerLongstreth, K. (1995) “GIS collection development, staffing and training” in The Journal of Academic Librarianship, July, 267‐274Sorice, M. (2006) “An analysis of GIS services websites in academic libraries”,MasterThesis,[http://etd.ils.unc.edu/dspace/handle/1901/303] 1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 24
  25. 25. Thank you!!1st Workshop on Digital Iinformation Management, March 30-31, 2011 25

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