Skeletal System

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Skeletal System

  1. 1. Parts of the skeletal system: • Bones (skeleton) • Joints • Cartilages • Ligaments (bone to bone)(tendon=bone to muscle) Divided into two sections • Axial skeleton- skull, spinal column, and rib cage • Appendicular skeleton – limbs and girdle Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  2. 2. Functions of Bones • Support of the body • Protection of soft organs • Movement due to attached skeletal muscles • Storage of minerals and fats • Blood cell formation Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  3. 3. Bones of the Human Body • The skeleton has 206 bones • Two basic types of bone tissue • Compact bone • Homogeneous • Spongy bone • Small needle-like pieces of bone • Many open spaces Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Figure 5.2b
  4. 4. Bones are classified by their shape: 1.Long- bones are longer than they are wide (arms, legs) 2.Short- usually square in shape, cube like (wrist, ankle) 3.Flat- flat , curved (skull, Sternum) 4.Irregular- odd shapes (vertebrae, pelvis)
  5. 5. Classification of Bones on the Basis of Shape Figure 5.1 Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  6. 6. Types of Bone Cells • Osteocytes • Mature bone cells • Osteoblasts • Bone-forming cells • Osteoclasts • Bone-destroying cells • Break down bone matrix for remodeling and release of calcium • Bone remodeling is a process by both osteoblasts and osteoclasts Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  7. 7. Changes in the Human Skeleton • In embryos, the skeleton is primarily hyaline cartilage • During development, much of this cartilage is replaced by bone • Cartilage remains in isolated areas • Bridge of the nose • Parts of ribs • Joints Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  8. 8. The Human Skeleton
  9. 9. Appendicular skeleton Axial Skeleton
  10. 10. The Axial Skeleton • Forms the longitudinal part of the body • Divided into three parts • Skull • Vertebral Column • Rib Cage • Supports and protects organs of head, neck and trunk. Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  11. 11. The Axial Skeleton Figure 5.6 Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Slide
  12. 12. Appendicular skeleton includes bones of limbs and bones that anchor them to the axial skeleton. Appendicular skeleton: pectoral girdle (clavicle, scapula) upper limbs (arms) pelvic girdle (sacrum, coccyx) lower limbs (legs) Articulation- where joints meet, connect, and are formed.
  13. 13. Joints A joint, or articulation, is the place where two bones come together. • Fibrous- Immovable:connect bones, no movement. (skull and pelvis). • Cartilaginous- slightly movable, bones are attached by cartilage, a little movement (spine or ribs). • Synovial- freely movable, much more movement than cartilaginous joints. Cavities between bones are filled with synovial fluid. This fluid helps lubricate and protect the bones.
  14. 14. The Synovial Joint Figure 5.28 Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Slide 5.51
  15. 15. Types of Synovial Joints Based on Shape Figure 5.29a–c Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Benjamin Cummings Slide
  16. 16. Types of Joints based on Movement Hinge- A hinge joint allows extension and retraction of an appendage. (Elbow, Knee)
  17. 17. Ball and Socket- A ball and socket joint allows for radial movement in almost any direction. They are found in the hips and shoulders. (Hip, Shoulder)
  18. 18. Gliding- In a gliding or plane joint bones slide past each other. Mid-carpal and midtarsal joints are gliding joints. (Hands, Feet)
  19. 19. Saddle- This type of joint occurs when the touching surfaces of two bones have both concave and convex regions with the shapes of the two bones complementing one other and allowing a wide range of movement. (Thumb)

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