First Results from the High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer during the 2010 GRIP Hurricane Field Campaign Shannon Brown,...
JPL High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) <br />Microwave radiometer for 3-D all-weather temperature and water va...
Upgrades for Global Hawk<br />Recently completed extensive upgrades for HAMSR in preparation for Global Hawk deployment un...
New 183 GHz Receiver<br />Installed MIMRAM LNA developed by JPL under NASA ESTO ACT program into HAMSR 183 GHZ receivers<b...
cm<br />cm<br />
NASA GRIP Mission<br /><ul><li>  Aug-Sep 2010; DC-8, Global Hawk, WB-57
  Improve understanding of tropical cyclone formation and intensification
  First ever over flight of a tropical cyclone with the Global Hawk</li></li></ul><li>HAMSR Imagery During GRIP<br />Hurri...
Hurricane Karl 2010<br /><ul><li>20 eye overpasses
   14 hours over storm
  Strongest storm ever recorded in Bay of Campeche
  Intensified at nearly double the rate considered as “rapid intensification”
  Intensity forecast errors 2x greater the long term average</li></ul>NHC TC Karl Report, Stewart 2011<br />
Precipitation Structure<br />
	Thermodynamic Structure<br />Composite images of limb corrected brightness temperature at 54.94 [250mb peak] and 55.5 GHz...
<ul><li>  Warm core anomaly  computed relative to average profile 225-250 km from the storm center
  Peak warming at 250 mb level
   The top of inversion layer, indicated by a minimum in qE, is observed around 700 mb
  Moist air is observed below the inversion layer with drier air aloft</li></ul>	Inner Core Thermodynamic Structure<br />
Monitoring Hurricane Intensity with HAMSR<br />Investigations using AMSU data have shown strong correlation between 200mb ...
Eye-wall contamination is a large error source for satellite sensors</li></li></ul><li>AMSU Warm Core Analysis<br />Bruesk...
54.94 GHz 9/17 10:58 UTC<br />54.94 GHz 9/17 00:39 UTC<br />55.5 GHz 9/17 00:39 UTC<br />55.5 GHz 9/17 10:58 UTC<br />AMSU...
	Time Evolution of Inner 	Temperature<br />Warm anomaly propagated to lower levels as the storm intensified with the peak ...
	Time Evolution of Inner 	Core Relative Humidity<br />The relative humidity in the upper troposphere decreased as lower tr...
Hurricane Karl 2010<br />
<ul><li>Correlation between warm core anomaly at different levels to minimum pressure and maximum sustained winds from NHC...
  Sensitivity between +5  to +6K/ms-1 and - 2.7 to -3.6K/mb
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

HAMSR_Brown_IGARSS.pptx

603 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
603
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

HAMSR_Brown_IGARSS.pptx

  1. 1. First Results from the High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer during the 2010 GRIP Hurricane Field Campaign Shannon Brown, Bjorn Lambrigtsen, Richard Denning, Boon Lim, Jordan Tanabe, Alan TannerJet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology<br />Shannon.T.Brown@jpl.nasa.gov<br />HAMSR<br />Karl<br />Karl<br />Earl<br />
  2. 2. JPL High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) <br />Microwave radiometer for 3-D all-weather temperature and water vapor sounding, similar to AMSU on NOAA platform<br />25 sounding channels in three bands: <br />50-60 GHz, 118 GHz, 183 GHz<br />Cross track scanning<br />+ 60o off nadir<br />65 km swath<br />1.9 km resolution<br />JPL High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR)<br />6<br />10<br />8<br />13 mm<br />HAMSR PWV<br />
  3. 3. Upgrades for Global Hawk<br />Recently completed extensive upgrades for HAMSR in preparation for Global Hawk deployment under NASA AITT program<br />AITT objective was to make a state of the art operational instrument<br />State-of-the-art Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) added to 118 and 183 GHz receivers<br />Data system upgraded to provide real time data access and on-board science processing<br />Instrument re-packed into light-weight compact housing for deployment in forward bay of GH<br />Perform detailed instrument calibration and characterization (Brown et al., TGRS, in press)<br />
  4. 4. New 183 GHz Receiver<br />Installed MIMRAM LNA developed by JPL under NASA ESTO ACT program into HAMSR 183 GHZ receivers<br />Noise reduced by an order of magnitude<br />Noise at 0.1-0.2K level will improve observation of small scale water vapor features<br />Old HAMSR 183 GHz<br />New UAV-HAMSR w/ 183 GHz LNA front end<br />
  5. 5. cm<br />cm<br />
  6. 6. NASA GRIP Mission<br /><ul><li> Aug-Sep 2010; DC-8, Global Hawk, WB-57
  7. 7. Improve understanding of tropical cyclone formation and intensification
  8. 8. First ever over flight of a tropical cyclone with the Global Hawk</li></li></ul><li>HAMSR Imagery During GRIP<br />Hurricane Earl 2010<br />
  9. 9. Hurricane Karl 2010<br /><ul><li>20 eye overpasses
  10. 10. 14 hours over storm
  11. 11. Strongest storm ever recorded in Bay of Campeche
  12. 12. Intensified at nearly double the rate considered as “rapid intensification”
  13. 13. Intensity forecast errors 2x greater the long term average</li></ul>NHC TC Karl Report, Stewart 2011<br />
  14. 14. Precipitation Structure<br />
  15. 15. Thermodynamic Structure<br />Composite images of limb corrected brightness temperature at 54.94 [250mb peak] and 55.5 GHz [150 mb peak] show most significant warming within a 30km radius of storm center <br />
  16. 16. <ul><li> Warm core anomaly computed relative to average profile 225-250 km from the storm center
  17. 17. Peak warming at 250 mb level
  18. 18. The top of inversion layer, indicated by a minimum in qE, is observed around 700 mb
  19. 19. Moist air is observed below the inversion layer with drier air aloft</li></ul> Inner Core Thermodynamic Structure<br />
  20. 20. Monitoring Hurricane Intensity with HAMSR<br />Investigations using AMSU data have shown strong correlation between 200mb temperature anomaly and hurricane intensity<br />Comparisons of AMSU warm core temperature anomaly to maximum wind speed (left) and central pressure (right) [from Kidder et al. 2000]<br />HAMSR warm-core in Hurricane Erin<br /><ul><li>High-resolution observations from HAMSR can be used to predict hurricane intensity and improve algorithms for satellite sensors
  21. 21. Eye-wall contamination is a large error source for satellite sensors</li></li></ul><li>AMSU Warm Core Analysis<br />Brueske et al. 2003<br />
  22. 22. 54.94 GHz 9/17 10:58 UTC<br />54.94 GHz 9/17 00:39 UTC<br />55.5 GHz 9/17 00:39 UTC<br />55.5 GHz 9/17 10:58 UTC<br />AMSU Images from Univ. of Wisc-CIMSS<br />
  23. 23. Time Evolution of Inner Temperature<br />Warm anomaly propagated to lower levels as the storm intensified with the peak warm anomaly increasing by ~4C<br />
  24. 24. Time Evolution of Inner Core Relative Humidity<br />The relative humidity in the upper troposphere decreased as lower troposphere remained moist<br />
  25. 25. Hurricane Karl 2010<br />
  26. 26. <ul><li>Correlation between warm core anomaly at different levels to minimum pressure and maximum sustained winds from NHC best track
  27. 27. Sensitivity between +5 to +6K/ms-1 and - 2.7 to -3.6K/mb
  28. 28. Strongest correlation observed in mid-troposphere</li></li></ul><li>L1B files: ftp://grip.nsstc.nasa.gov/grip/HAMSR/<br />GE quick looks: http://grip.jpl.nasa.gov/<br />9/01<br />9/16<br />9/12<br />8/28<br /><ul><li>HAMSR Level 1B data publically available
  29. 29. Level 1B product contains quality controlled, calibrated, geo-located brightness temperatures for the Earth scene
  30. 30. L1B files in netCDF format, ~500MB/24 hours
  31. 31. Over 120 hours total for 5 flights</li></ul>9/23<br />
  32. 32. JPL GRIP Data Portal<br />: http://grip.jpl.nasa.gov<br />
  33. 33. Summary<br />UAV-HAMSR has deployed on the GH during GRIP 2010 and WISPAR 2011 – data available<br /><ul><li>Demonstrated capability to monitor real time evolution of tropical cyclones
  34. 34. Next mission will be HS3 – 2012-2014</li></ul>Flights begin Aug 25, 2011<br />
  35. 35.
  36. 36. HAMSR Development Timeline<br />IIP-98 “High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer on a Remotely Piloted Aircraft” – Lambrigtsen (PI)<br />1998<br />2001: CAMEX-4 on ER2<br />ACT-05 “Miniature MMIC Low Mass/power Radiometer Modules for the 180 GHz GeoSTAR Array” - Kangaslahti (PI)<br />2005: TCSP on ER2<br />2006: NAMMA on DC-8<br />AITT-07 “Unmanned Aerial Vehicle - High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer for Atmospheric State Reconnaissance” - Lambrigtsen (PI)<br />AIST-08 “Technology Infusion for the Real Time Mission Monitor - Goodman (PI)<br />2010: GRIP on Global Hawk<br />2011: WISPAR on Global Hawk<br />2012<br />2012-2014: HS-3 on Global Hawk<br />
  37. 37. Tropical Cyclone Reconnaissance<br />HAMSR on the Global Hawk is a powerful tool for monitoring the thermodynamic evolution of tropical cyclones when loitering near eye of storm for periods up to 24 hours<br />Track intensity by observing warm core anomaly and 3-D precipitation structure<br />Useful for validating satellite retrievals<br />Long duration data also key for demonstrating geostationary microwave sounding science -> PATH mission<br />
  38. 38. WISPAR Atmospheric Rivers Flights<br />HAMSR real-time PWV data used to time release of dropsondes near atmospheric rivers<br /> Data available within 10-30 seconds of acquisition<br />CLW<br />PWV<br />PWV<br />
  39. 39. HAMSR GRIP Ground Data System<br />Commanding<br />Data downlink<br />netCDF L1B files<br />GHOC<br />JPL Hurricane Portal<br />HAMSR website quick look images<br />RTMM <br />HAMSR ground data processor<br />
  40. 40. HAMSR RTMM Display for GRIP<br />HAMSR software upgraded after GRIP to provide real-time imagery over Iridium<br />Successfully tested during 2011 WISPAR campaign <br />

×