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The micro genetic development of concepts

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Clarà, M., & Mauri, T. (2011). The micro-genetic development of concepts: the introduction of the construct of practical concept in CHAT. ISCAR. Rome, 5-10 September.

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The micro genetic development of concepts

  1. 1. The micro-genetic development of concepts: the introduction of practical concept in CHAT Marc Clarà Teresa Mauri
  2. 2. Scientific and spontaneous concepts <ul><li>The difference between spontaneous and scientific concepts </li></ul><ul><li>The development of scientific and spontaneous concepts </li></ul><ul><li>The explicative role of the distinction scientific/spontaneous </li></ul>
  3. 3. Scientific and spontaneous concepts <ul><li>The difference between spontaneous and scientific concepts </li></ul>Referent of a spontaneous concept: a specific object of reality Referent of a scientific concept: a set of representations
  4. 4. Scientific and spontaneous concepts <ul><li>The difference between spontaneous and scientific concepts </li></ul>The small bead sinks in the water The big bead sinks in the water Spontaneous concept Spontaneous concept Scientific concept: Principle of Arquimedes
  5. 5. Scientific and spontaneous concepts <ul><li>The development of scientific and spontaneous concepts </li></ul>The small bead sinks in the water The big bead sinks in the water Spontaneous concept Spontaneous concept Scientific concept: Principle of Arquimedes Tension between concepts Zone of Proximal Development System of generality
  6. 6. Scientific and spontaneous concepts <ul><li>The development of scientific and spontaneous concepts: system of generality </li></ul>Small bead Big bead Arquimedes Principle Latitude (degree of semantic generality) Longitude: (extension of the referent)
  7. 7. Scientific and spontaneous concepts <ul><li>The development of scientific and spontaneous concepts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Development is caused by the dialectic tension between concepts within the system of generality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>These concepts can be put in tension only because of the existence of a Zone of Proximal Development </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Scientific and spontaneous concepts <ul><li>The explicative role of the distinction scientific/spontaneous </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The conceptual tensions in the system of generality is the explicative principle of conceptual development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The distinction scientific/spontaneous is the distinction between the two constituents of the dialectical unit which explains the conceptual development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ontogenetic development occurs when a new parallel appears in the globe; so a new set of scientific concepts generalize the preexistent system and thus transform the whole conceptual relations. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Because its relation with the ZDP, the distinction is also the articulation between instruction and conceptual development </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Scientific and spontaneous concepts <ul><li>The difference between spontaneous and scientific concepts </li></ul><ul><li>The development of scientific and spontaneous concepts </li></ul><ul><li>The explicative role of the distinction scientific/spontaneous </li></ul>
  10. 10. Situational representations <ul><li>Mental models (cognitive psychology) </li></ul><ul><li>Repertoire (Schön) </li></ul><ul><li>Images (Clandinin) </li></ul><ul><li>Implicit representations (Pozo) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Representations whose referent is a SITUATION. </li></ul></ul>Spontaneous concept: the referent is a specific object of reality Scientific concept: the referent is a set of representations ??????????????: the referent is a situation
  11. 11. Situation A set of circumstances Circumstance : anything in the environment which constrains the relation subject-environment in practical relation Practical relation : the coexistence of two or more circumstances which constrain the same relation subject-environment which in a micro-genetic domain constitute a whole with a meaning as expression of one or more systems of activity which exist in a historical-genetic domain
  12. 12. Small bead in the water Spontaneous concept Titanic sinks in the water Spontaneous concept Scientific concept: Principle of Arquimedes few boats on the ship high number of passengers closest ship without telegraph Extremely low temperature of water practical relation Specific situation on the night of April 14th, 1912 Situational representation: Practical concept
  13. 13. Practical concept: Morphology Spontaneous concept: the referent is a specific object of reality Scientific concept: the referent is a set of representations Practical concept: the referent is a specific situation The three components of the dialectic unit (system of generality) which explains the conceptual development Specific genesis of practical concepts: At the same time toward the system of generality (relations with other concepts) and toward the specific reality (practical relations between circumstances)
  14. 14. To sum up <ul><li>The practical concept as a third component of the dialectic unit which is the explicative principle of conceptual development </li></ul><ul><li>The practical concept have different morphology than scientific and spontaneous. Spontaneous refers directly to a specific object; Scientific refers to a set of representations related semantically; Practical refers to a specific situation </li></ul><ul><li>The practical concept presents different genesis than scientific and spontaneous. Scientific develops toward the specific reality; Spontaneous develops toward a system; Practical develops at the same time towards the system and towards the practical relations between the specific circumstances </li></ul>
  15. 15. Some questions <ul><li>How the respective developments of scientific, spontaneous and practical concepts are related </li></ul><ul><li>How the nature of a ZPD can make possible the development of the system of generality </li></ul><ul><li>How new practical, scientific and spontaneous concepts can be introduced in the system of generality </li></ul><ul><li>To empirically develop the relation between situation, system of activity and practical concept </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>Thank you very much </li></ul>
  17. 17. Practical concept: Development <ul><li>We registered a set of conversations between a teacher student and a tutor teacher during three months </li></ul><ul><li>We identified some practical concepts and we observed its development during these three months </li></ul><ul><li>We found that the practical concept developed at the same time in two directions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Towards the system of generality: external development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Towards the specific situation: internal development </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Practical concept: External development <ul><li>First: The teacher student becomes more and more capable to locate the practical concept in relation to other practical concepts distributed in the system of generality </li></ul><ul><li>Second: The teacher student becomes more and more capable to elaborate the conceptual connection between different practical concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Third: The teacher student becomes more and more capable to move from one practical concept to another; that is, to change the concept by means of which he sees the reality </li></ul>
  19. 19. Practical concept: Internal development <ul><li>First: The teacher student feels more and more intesivelly the mutual obligation of the circumstances </li></ul><ul><li>Second: The teacher student becomes more and more capable to accomodate the values of the circumstances which obligate to each other </li></ul>
  20. 20. First external development S: So, I thought, with the chocolate, what did it happen? Where did it go? Which path you think it did? Chocolate and then, to give them a draw, and they see which path the chocolate did. Draw Of course, here it lacks... because when you told me four sessions I had to make it shorter I think that here there is time enough for adding the thing of the animals first Animals
  21. 21. Second external development T : you would make them to draw (...) let’s see, how would you introduce it? Now I will give you a chocolate? no Draw and chocolate S : No, first we would talk about the animals they know, and say: they breath, they eat... and then to say: if the animals eat we also eat (...) Animals and chocolate T : yes, but because we also eat I give you a chocolate? no S : no, no, no, not in this way T : It would be: I would like that we think together about how eating works, and I will give you a chocolate... S : yes, that’s true
  22. 22. Third external development T : Probably they will say that blood move inside veins, and others will say that goes freely inside the body. So how could we know this? Let’s see, is there any parte of our body where veins are visible? or where it is visible how the blood stay inside our body? (...) From talk about blood to look at our body S : yes T : let’s take it again?... they will say either freely or in veins, and then what? S : this... T : don’t be nervious, quiet. They will say freely or in veins. Imagine that one child says freely and another in veins, how do we go ahead? how do we go ahead?... Let’s see if our body can tell us somthing, let’s look at our hands, let’s see, what do we see? S : yes
  23. 23. First internal development S : ...if they say cells I’ll take it and i’ll say look, they are interested in, or something, but if they don’t say it, I’ll not say it, because perhaps they are not.. What pupils say Student questions Contents T : no, you must ask in order to obligate, to see if they say it, and if they don’t say it then nothing, we will realize S : of course, but... perhaps one says “and this energy where comes from”, and I see that everybody... and then it is the moment, isn’t it?
  24. 24. Second internal development S : I didn’t expect that they say so many things, because they said an idea, and then more and more, and I didn’t expect so much, and in a moment I became nervious and I thought “what do I do, what do I do now?” (...) I didn’t know how to go ahead What the pupils say The contents What the student asks

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