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Exploring the usability of medication management apps with older adults
Kelly Grindrod PharmD MSc | Meliss...
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Stanford Medicine X Poster: Mobile medication apps for older adults

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Stanford Medicine X Poster: Mobile medication apps for older adults

  1. 1. 31% Use Tablets Exploring the usability of medication management apps with older adults Kelly Grindrod PharmD MSc | Melissa Li BScPhm Candidate | Allison Gates RD PhD Candidate e asked 35 adults aged 50+ to spend 2 hours trying 4 popular medication management apps on mobile devices. Here is what we found. Most participants had trusted methods to track or take medications, such as pillboxes, watches with alarms and computerized printouts of medications lists. Most participants were capable of, and interested in, using apps for medication management. Many participants looked for a need that their current medication management system was not filling. For example, if someone was comfortable managing their own medications, they wondered if they could use an app to help an aging spouse or parent. Participants felt simple graphics and linear layouts improved usability. Few thought reminders would be useful as devices are often powered off or left at home. Older users may also have difficulty hearing reminders. Clearer regulations may help users put more trust in medication management apps. To improve design, older adults should be involved throughout development. Objective. To explore the usability and utility of existing medication management applications for older adults. Each person was given access to an iPad, iPhone and Samsung Galaxy loaded with the following apps: In groups of 3-7, participants were given standardized prescription and non-prescription bottles to complete app- specific tasks that highlighted different features (e.g., reminders, drug interaction scanning, profile sharing via email, drug info). Participants evaluated apps with the System Usability Scale. A repeated measures test was used to compare scores. Afterwards, researchers moderated a 30min discussion on user experiences. Sessions were recorded and transcribed and analyzed using grounded theory. W MyMedRec Pillboxie PocketPharmacist Drug Hub Methods. Results. More information. Table. Participant characteristics (N=35) 23% Use Smartphones 89%Use Computers More preferred? DrugHub: simple, good display and easy to use and read. MyMedRec: easy to navigate (most linear) and simplest. Less preferred? Pillboxie: nice graphics but little value over a pillbox. PocketPharm: lots of information but overwhelming. How did it feel? Overwhelming Challenging Unfamiliar Easier with practice Enlightening Convenient @kgrindrod Thank you. Our project was partly funded by a Royal Bank of Canada Research Undergraduate Fellowship. Special thanks to the Cities of Waterloo and Kitchener and to the Kitchener Public Library for all their help during recruitment. We do not have any conflicts of interest to declare. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 MyMedRec Pillboxie DrugHub PocketPharm* Figure. Mean System Usability Scale Scores (*p<0.05) Take-home.

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