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THE MEETING PLAN (CONSISTS OF FOUR ELEMENTS)
It is what you want to get out of a meeting that decides the agenda, not the ...
MEETING NAME
By naming a meeting, we immediately signal to participants
the theme, thus mentally preparing them. Typical m...
THE MEETING PLAN IS THE MOST IMPORTANT
TOOL FOR A SUCCESSFUL MEETING
Prepare a Meeting Plan
(Name the meeting + write a pu...
MORE TIPS
The meeting plan is always the first point on the agenda.
This is where you tell participants why they have been...
MEETING PREPARATION (GRID STANDARD)
the responsibility of the person calling the meetings
The responsibility of the person...
PREPARE THE ROOM
• Do we have all tools and materials? Check with all facilitators and presenters
• Climate – air
• Food –...
SUMMARY, MEETING ROLES
Leader: The person who has administrative responsibility. S/he initiates and calls to meetings,
and...
GROUND RULES FOR THE MEETING
- we agree on this
Meetings are often ineffective and not achieving desired outcomes due to i...
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Mange ledere bruker halve tiden sin i møter og anser halvparten som bortkastet tid.
Avsporinger og irrelevans

Iflg. undersøkelser er hyppige avsporinger og for mye irrelevant informasjon grunnen. For egen del vil jeg legge til; for dårlige forberedelser og for lite forhåndsdelt informasjon om hensikten og ønsket resultat for møtet. Det er altså MYE å vinne på å utvikle kompetanse på god møteteknikk.

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Great meetings

  1. 1. THE MEETING PLAN (CONSISTS OF FOUR ELEMENTS) It is what you want to get out of a meeting that decides the agenda, not the reverse. A common question when people are invited to a meeting is “what’s on the agenda”. One should rather ask: “what do we want to get out of the meeting” and how do we get it. Thus, expressing clearly and concretely the Desired Outcome (DO), is crucial. It is the DO that decides who to invite and how to organize the meeting. The agenda is merely a plan on how to achieve the desired outcome. GREAT MEETINGS Norwegian leaders spend about 40% of their work time in meetings, and 40% of this time is viewed as unproductive. (Henning Bang, Institute of Psychology, University of Oslo). A survey from US based Frontier Assoc indicates that an average of 25% of the work day is wasted due to meaningless meetings. The surveys indicate that the most important reasons for the problems are frequent off track dispersions and too much irrelevant information. On my part I will add: lack of information and common understanding of the purpose and desired outcome of the meeting – why am I at this meeting? Thus there is MUCH to be gained by developing effective meeting skills. In Grid, our understanding, skills and meeting techniques, have become a part of our culture and work practices – developed by the invaluable help of our coach during the past 25 years, Anders Skoe of ICS Interactive Coaching Services Sarl, (Switzerland). Here’s the recipe: WHAT IS A MEETING, AND WHY DO WE HAVE MEETINGS? • 2 OR MORE PEOPLE • AT THE SAME PLACE • AT THE SAME TIME • THE SAME PURPOSE, DESIRED OUTCOME AND AGENDA WHY ”ACTION”. We want action. We want something to happen. We want progress on projects, a task etc. A universal reason for holding a meeting is a desire for action afterwards. GREAT MEETINGS LEAD TO BETTER ACTION SAME PLACE SAME TIME SAME PURPOSE
  2. 2. MEETING NAME By naming a meeting, we immediately signal to participants the theme, thus mentally preparing them. Typical meeting names are ‘information meeting’, ‘follow-up’ (in projects), ‘decision meeting’, ‘problem solving meeting’, ‘idea generation meeting’ (brainstorming is one method), ‘get to know each other’, etc. THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING The reason for organizing a meeting is almost always that we want to do something together. Therefore, a good approach is to express the purpose in the form of a verb, in the infinitive, at the beginning of a short sentence. Examples of such “why verbs” are: ‘to clarify…’, ‘to inform about…’, ‘to start our work on…’, ‘to find a solution on…’, ‘to gain insight on…’, ‘to brainstorm on…’, etc. DESIRED OUTCOME OF THE MEETING After having put words on the purpose, we must then clearly enunciate what we want to end up with at the end of the meeting; in other words the Desired Outcome. As opposed to the purpose, Desired Outcome will contain several items. We start the description by a “what noun”. What do we want to end up with? Every meeting should end up with an Action Plan, as the final desired outcome. Other examples of DO are: ‘a list of..’, ‘a decision on..’, ‘agreement on..’, ‘insight into..’, ‘more knowledge on..’, ‘ a good foundation for doing something..’, etc. MEETING AGENDA The last element of the meeting plan is an agenda. Meeting plans are often done by skipping purpose and desired outcome, and solely done by preparing an agenda with a list of ‘what’, ‘when’, and sometimes ‘who’. It often simply represents a list of themes. Such ‘agendas’ are better than nothing, but it works much better if one adds a fourth column, namely the ’how’ column. A better agenda uses four columns: What/How/Who/When. A MEETING PLAN CONSISTS OF FOUR ELEMENTS
  3. 3. THE MEETING PLAN IS THE MOST IMPORTANT TOOL FOR A SUCCESSFUL MEETING Prepare a Meeting Plan (Name the meeting + write a purpose, desired outcome and agenda, remember breaks) AGENDA EXAMPLE 1 – WEAK WHAT WHO WHEN Theme 1 Theme 2 Theme 3 A WHAT/WHO/WHEN-agenda says nothing about the process or method planned for each theme. AGENDA EXAMPLE 2 - STRONG WHAT HOW WHO WHEN Meeting Plan* Purpose, DO, Agenda Leader From-To, 10min Example: 0800-0810 Theme 1 Ex: Brainstorming Facilitator Ex: 0810-0830 Theme 2 Ex: Clarify, Eliminate Duplicates, Vote Facilitator 0830-0900 Break Coffee, etc All 0900-0910 Theme 3 Presentation on flip charts Facilitator 0910-0925 Action Plan Who - What - When Facilitator 0925-1000 Evaluation** What was good, how to improve Facilitator 1000-1010 *Always first point on the agenda. **Focus on process or method A WHAT/HOW/WHO/WHEN – agenda is a planning tool. This is to help those responsible for the different themes (the What) on the agenda to plan the process or method for their themes. By thinking through the processes (the How), one can prepare the various tools to be used at the meeting (examples are presentation charts, an oral presentation, proposed solution for dialogue, etc.). In this way, the agenda is not simply a haphazard listing of subjects done 10 minutes before the start of the meeting. It is a planning tool for all participants in the meeting. WHAT? That which is to be covered within the given time of the meeting The method or process to be used on the subject named (theme) Who will be the facilitator for that part of the meeting From – to time of the meeting for that subject HOW? WHO? WHEN?
  4. 4. MORE TIPS The meeting plan is always the first point on the agenda. This is where you tell participants why they have been asked to attend the meeting (Purpose), what is expected for all to end up with at the end of the meeting, or what contribution is expected from them (Desired Outcome), and how the time will be spent to achieve the DO (the agenda). This is the time for clarification and understanding for participants (why was I invited to this meeting?), to motivate all to contribute to the success of the meeting. This is the time to adjust the plan if needed, with respect to purpose, desired outcome, agenda and roles. AGENDA An agenda is only a tool to estimate the use of time during the meeting – a plan and best guess for the use of time before start. If it is realized during the meeting that more or less time is needed than what was planned, the facilitator can take a “time-out”, to decide how the group wants to handle it. It may mean more or less time can be spent on other agenda items, or noted for treatment at another meeting. Another possibility to get everyone’s accept to extend the closing time of the meeting. TIPS: Write the proposal on a flip chart (maybe on more than one page if there is a considerable change) and place the flip chart on the wall visible to all during the rest of the meeting. Meeting Plan example (Title or Name of the meeting, Purpose, Desired Outcome, Agenda) FOLLOW-UP MEETING DATE: 2014-04-01 PURPOSE OF THE MEETING: To work on, present, inform about, or… DESIRED OUTCOME: Agreement on… Have a good foundation for doing… A list of xx number of ideas for a solution to the problem of… WHAT HOW WHO WHEN Meeting Plan* Purpose, Deesired Outcome, Agenda, Ground Rules, Dialogue Leader From – To Ab 15 min (0800-0815) Theme 1 E.G. Brainstorming Facilitator 0815-0830 Theme 2 Clarification and Dialogue Facilitator xx – yy Theme 3 Voting Facilitator xx – yy Action Plan What – Who – When Facilitator xx – yy Evaluation** Plus (good) and “delta-plus” (to improve) Facilitator xx – yy 15min * Always 1st point on the agenda ** DO and process An agenda is not carved in stone!
  5. 5. MEETING PREPARATION (GRID STANDARD) the responsibility of the person calling the meetings The responsibility of the person calling the meetings Think through the purpose and desired outcome. Write it down for yourself on a flip chart. (In meetings where flip charts are not used, the purpose and desired outcome should be described orally.) Write the agenda on a flip chart, and involve participants who are responsible for one or more subjects on the agenda in the “How” – column. In this manner, the agenda is a planning and preparation tool for the person with the responsibility for one or more subjects, and they may thereby be and appear as well prepared at the meeting. TIPS If there will be external participants, for example in a customer meeting, prepare your meeting plan a long time ahead, as ‘a suggestion’. Then ensure that the customer understands and agrees on the desired outcome, and that he thereby understands that the time is wisely allotted. TIPS The meeting plan should be presented on flip charts at the outset, and then hung on the wall for all to see during the whole meeting. All can then check that the purpose, desired outcome and agenda (the use of time) are on track. It is especially important that the agenda is clearly visible all the time, for all to see how we are doing in relation to the planned work and time. Change points on the agenda if the customer or others suggest a different focus, emphasis or use of time. In this way you show respect for the customer and participants. There should be coherence between the two columns of ‘How’ and ‘When’. Evidently, participants from your own organization should know the meeting plan in advance, so that those who have facilitator responsibilities for point on the agenda are well prepared, both with respect to content and process. If you think it is prudent, involve customers or other ‘externals’ in the meeting plan. Send out the detailed meeting plan, along with the invitation in advance so that participants are properly prepared for what’s coming. Remember breaks, fresh air, food and drink
  6. 6. PREPARE THE ROOM • Do we have all tools and materials? Check with all facilitators and presenters • Climate – air • Food – drink • Take the lead After normal small talk, invite participants to see and listen to the presentation of the meeting plan – the purpose, desired outcome and agenda • Keep to the agreed time If appropriate, plan date and time for the next meeting. (Part of the Action Plan) • Send out the meeting minutes within 24 hours FOUR MEETING ROLES Leader, facilitator, recorder and participant A common misunderstanding is that the person calling the meeting will be leading the meeting. It must be emphasized that it is the desired outcome that is the goal of the meeting. (DO and goal are identical concepts). It is often a leader (company president, department head, project manager, strategic counsel, etc who sees a need for, and calls a meeting. That is why we say that it is the leader who is responsible for the result – but not necessarily the process that leads to the result or outcome. The wise leader does not make himself the center of attention, believing that simply calling a meeting will give him the desired outcome without thinking about how. There are often others in the company or the team who are better at process facilitation, and thus obtaining the desired outcome. Therefore, the leader should involve key individuals, both internal and external, and think through the process of the meeting – especially the ‘What’ and the ‘How’ columns on the agenda. Each point on the agenda will have a facilitator, a process- responsible person, to facilitate the activity with a given time limit. Several individuals may contribute to the process or method, even if they have no formal process responsibility. Participants will be named as responsible for tasks on the action plan – to be achieved after the meeting. Think carefully about who you invite to a meeting. Only those who are involved in process, tasks, ‘expert input’ and those who will be affected by the outcome of meetings should be there. Don’t waste people’s time. ROLE PROCESS CONTENT RESULT Facilitator X Recorder X Participant X Leader X RESPONSIBILITY SEND OUT THE MEETING MINUTES
  7. 7. SUMMARY, MEETING ROLES Leader: The person who has administrative responsibility. S/he initiates and calls to meetings, and puts words on the desired outcome, but does not necessarily ‘lead’ the whole meeting, or facilitate points on the agenda. The leader welcomes participants, and may present the meeting plan. Facilitator: Someone appointed by the leader to facilitate the whole meeting or parts of the agenda. The principal facilitator is responsible for the process of the whole meeting, and is therefore involved in the planning and preparation. Other facilitators may be responsible for one or more items on the agenda. (Different names in ‘Who’ column.) A facilitator must be neutral on content and suggest processes and work methods, thus helping participants on content. A facilitator who expresses a special interest in content can easily lose track of the process, and thus weakening the quality of the process. We can only focus consciously on one thing at the time. Participants: Contribute knowledge, special competence, and skills that help achieving the desired outcome. Exceptionally, they may suggest process and helpful approaches and methods as well. Recorder: Someone who is appointed responsible for recording content during the meeting, and preparing and sending out the minutes after the meeting. The recorder may also be involved in the planning, preparation and sending out the meeting plan and materials before the meeting. S/he takes care when minutes are sent to people who were not participating at the meeting, that they will understand the documentation – perhaps by sufficiently describing the Purpose, Desired Outcome, Agenda, Action Plan, content and conclusions. TIPS How to deal with well-intentioned input off the agenda? Create a ‘bin’ on a pre-prepared flip chart to record the point for all to see. This shows respect for the person and idea, and frees the individual to ‘reenter’ the meeting. This could also be named a ‘parking space’, or ‘to be considered at a later agenda point, or during action planning’. Frequently during meetings participants suggest ideas or issues that in themselves are interesting and/or important, but off the agenda. These points may sometimes have been forgotten during the planning before the meeting, or during the presentation of the meeting plan at the start of the meeting. Possibly, the facilitator may say, “Thank you for this input, I’m sure you can see that this is not the subject at this time, but we should record this not to lose it”. There are several options: one may change the agenda, if the subject is important enough at this meeting, move it into another subject later on the agenda, or put it into the action plan. The goal is to achieve the desired outcome first. Bin
  8. 8. GROUND RULES FOR THE MEETING - we agree on this Meetings are often ineffective and not achieving desired outcomes due to interruptions, inattention and mind dispersions during the meeting. One effective method to avoid this is to present a pre-prepared list of ‘ground rules’. The facilitator presents the points one by one for agreement before the meeting. Participants may suggest changes. This is especially valuable for longer lasting meetings – those lasting a half or full day. The following list contain good examples of points on such a list. Choose those that suit your meeting the best. Some are worth using at all meetings, such as “no food, drink, mobile phone or PC in the meeting room”. GROUND RULES 1 Responsibility for own learning 2 Good to fail, there are no stupid questions (all learn from it) 3 Keep to agreed times (start, breaks…) 4 No side conversations (express comments in plenary) 5 No food, drink, mobile phone, PC in meeting room (OK during breaks) 6 OK to disagree 7 Everyone present the whole time 8 One speaks at the time 9 See needs – help when needed 10 Confidentiality Origin: Freely after many years of cooperation with, and coaching by Anders Skoe, ICS MEETINGS AND BRANDINGA meeting is also a brand touch point for a company. It is a communication field, which can be planned and designed. A MEETING IS AN OPPORTUNITY •To strengthen (or weaken) the value added of a brand •To obtain increased positive (or negative) attention •To build brand recognition and knowledge •To tell a relevant brand story •To increase (or decrease) customer loyalty
  • ThomasBernhardThiisE

    Jun. 22, 2018
  • bjornte

    Aug. 1, 2017
  • mprosdocimo

    Jul. 12, 2017
  • mariafcamacho

    Jun. 4, 2017
  • griddesign

    Dec. 3, 2015

Mange ledere bruker halve tiden sin i møter og anser halvparten som bortkastet tid. Avsporinger og irrelevans Iflg. undersøkelser er hyppige avsporinger og for mye irrelevant informasjon grunnen. For egen del vil jeg legge til; for dårlige forberedelser og for lite forhåndsdelt informasjon om hensikten og ønsket resultat for møtet. Det er altså MYE å vinne på å utvikle kompetanse på god møteteknikk.

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