The Global City Summer 2011 Northwestern U MPPA

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The Global City Summer 2011 Northwestern U MPPA

  1. 1. MPPA-DL 452The Global CitySummer 2011Contact Information: NU email: g-wass@northwestern.edu; personal email: gregorywass@gmail.com; cell: 312-919-2919. Available weekdays 8am to 7pm (central).Course Description: Why do cities persist? The last decade has seen a resurgence in the economies of some majorcities—especially the global cities of this courses title—while other post-industrial cities continue a long decline.Cities are being transformed by the information revolution today much as cities were transformed by the industrialrevolution two centuries ago.In this course, students will develop an understanding of urbanization, including how city form differs dependingon when a city experiences its greatest growth, and how globalization can produce increasing disparity. The coursewill cover concepts in economic geography, transportation, sustainability, governance, economic development,poverty and inequality, architecture and urban planning. Readings will include recent studies on urbanization andglobalization.Textbooks:Brugmann, J. (latest edition). Welcome to the urban revolution. London: Bloomsbury Press.Sassen, S. (2006). Cities in a world economy. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge PressBrenner, N. & Keil, R. (Eds.). (2006). The global cities reader. Abingdon, OX: Routledge.Learning Goals: The goals of this course are to:-Understand the nature and history of the global city.-Formulate and theorize about the major research questions in the global cities literature.-Explain the effects of public policy actions on global cities.Evaluation:-Individual Case Study: 20% (200 points)-Midterm Exam: 15% (150 points)-Group Case Study: 20% (200 points)-Final Exam: 15% (150 points)-Participation: 30% (300 points)Participation on Discussion Boards: The participation score for the course is based on the quality and quantity ofengagement by the student in the weekly discussion board topics. Students must post at least once to each topicthread by EOD Thursday of each week, and again by EOD Sunday to receive full credit. However, cluttering adiscussion board with inappropriate, irrelevant, or insignificant material will not earn additional points and mayresult in receiving less than full credit. Content of the message is paramount. Also, it is important that we alwaysremain respectful of one another’s viewpoints and positions and, when necessary, agree to disagree, respectfully.Please remember to cite all sources – when relevant – in order to avoid plagiarism.Proctored Assessment: There is a proctored assessment requirement in this course. For additional information, MPPA 452 The Global City
  2. 2. please go to the Assignments section in Blackboard and scroll to the Proctored Exam Approval Application item.Grading Scale: The following is the grading scale for the course: 900-1000 points = A; 800-899 points = B; 650-799points = C; 0-649 points = F.Attendance: While this course is asynchronous, meaning that we will not meet at a particular time each week, oneto two sync sessions will be offered during the quarter at times to be announced. These are optional for studentsto attend. Even though we will not be meeting face-to-face in a physical classroom, participation on DiscussionBoards is required and is paramount to your success in this class.Late Work: There will be a 10 point deduction for every day an assignment is late.Learning Groups: Students will work in groups for one case study assignment. The instructor will post anannouncement listing groups and topics, and students will then be expected to work together collaboratively tocreate a presentation. Students may use any of the following tools for collaboration: e-mail, group DiscussionBoards, Skype, Google (docs, chat), Adobe Connect. The group case study will be graded as a whole and allmembers of the group will receive the same grade.Academic Integrity at Northwestern: Students are required to comply with University regulations regardingacademic integrity. If you are in doubt about what constitutes academic dishonesty, speak with your instructor orgraduate coordinator before the assignment is due and/or examine the University web site. Academic dishonestyincludes, but is not limited to, cheating on an exam, obtaining an unfair advantage, and plagiarism (e.g., takingmaterial from readings without citation or copying another students paper). Failure to maintain academic integritywill result in a grade sanction, possibly as severe as failing and being required to retake the course, and could leadto a suspension or expulsion from the program. Further penalties may apply. For more information, visit:http://www.scs.northwestern.edu/student/issues/academic_integrity.cfmPlagiarism is one form of academic dishonesty. Students can familiarize themselves with the definition andexamples of plagiarism, by visiting the site http://www.northwestern.edu/uacc/plagiar.html. Myriad other sourcescan be found online, as well.Assignments in this course may be required to be submitted through SafeAssign, a plagiarism detection andeducation tool. You can find an explanation of the tool athttp://wiki.safeassign.com/display/SAFE/Interpret+Reports. In brief, SafeAssign compares the submittedassignment to millions of documents in very large databases. It then generates a report showing the extent towhich text within a paper is very similar or identical to pre-existing sources. The user can then see how or whetherthe flagged text is cited appropriately, if at all. SafeAssign also returns a percentage score, indicating thepercentage of the submitted paper that is similar or identical to pre-existing sources. High scores are notnecessarily bad, nor do they necessarily indicate plagiarism, since the score doesnt take into account how orwhether material is cited. Low scores are not necessarily good, nor do they necessarily indicate a lack ofplagiarism. (If a 50-page paper had all original material, except for one short quote that was not cited, the scoremight be around 1%. But, not citing a quotation would still be plagiarism.)SafeAssign includes an option in which the student can submit a paper and see the resultant report beforesubmitting it to the instructor as a final copy. This ideally will help students better understand and avoidplagiarism.Other Processes and Policies: Please refer to your SCS student handbook athttp://www.scs.northwestern.edu/grad/information/handbook.cfm for additional course and program processesand policies. MPPA 452 The Global City
  3. 3. Course Schedule(Note: Changes may occur to the syllabus at the instructors discretion. When changes are made, students will benotified via an announcement in Blackboard.)Session 1 Themes/Paris: June 20 - 26Learning Objectives:After this session, the student will be able to:-Identify the characteristics of a global city.-Recognize the effect of globalization on cities, the spatial patterns within and among cities, and the effect ofglobalization on firms and households.-Discuss the reasons for specialization and hegemony of different cities in modern history, including Amsterdam,London and New York.-Discuss Brugmann’s four city-building approachesCourse Content:Reading -- For this session read the following:Brugmann, Chapters 1 and 6Sassen, Chapter 1Brenner, Chapters 1, 2, 3MultimediaThemes/Paris slidesDiscussion BoardEach Session you are required to participate in all Discussion Board forums. Your participation in both posting andresponding to other students comments is graded. For this week’s discussion topic(s), visit the Discussion Board inBlackboard.AssignmentProctored Exam Approval Application is due Sunday, June 26, 2011, 11:59pm (central time). For more information,click Assignments on the left navigation bar in Blackboard, and scroll to this assignment’s item.Session 2 Dynamics/London: June 27 – July 3Learning Objectives:After this session, the student will be able to:-Identify the major characteristics of global cities and key eras/stages in their history.-Differentiate between the ancient and modern drivers behind global city formation. MPPA 452 The Global City
  4. 4. -Discuss London’s policy responses to traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions.-Explain reasons for the different economic development patterns, economic geographies, urban/suburban formsand cultural histories of New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.Course Content:Reading -- For this session read the following:Brugmann, Chapters 3Sassen, Chapter 2Brenner, Chapters 4 and 5MultimediaDynamics/London slidesDiscussion BoardEach Session you are required to participate in all Discussion Board forums. Your participation in both posting andresponding to other students comments is graded. For this week’s discussion topic(s), visit the Discussion Board inBlackboard.AssignmentIndividual Case Study, Part 1: City/Theme Selection is due by Sunday, July 3, 2011 at 11:59pm (central time). Formore information, click Assignments on the left navigation bar in Blackboard, and scroll to this assignment’s item.Session 3 Circuits/Toronto: July 4 - 10Learning Objectives:After this session, the student will be able to:-Explain the economic, social and physical restructuring of global cities over the past 50 years.-Explain the role of transnationals and interpret Sassen’s statement that “global cities are strategic sites for themanagement of the global economy.”-Describe the major international flows of capital and people.-Explain the concept of “global circuits” of transnationals and diasporas.-Explain John Friedman’s “world city hypothesis”.Course Content:Reading -- For this session read the following:Brugmann, Chapters 2 and 9Sassen, Chapter 3Brenner, Chapters 6 and 7Multimedia MPPA 452 The Global City
  5. 5. Circuits/Toronto slidesDiscussion BoardEach Session you are required to participate in all Discussion Board forums. Your participation in both posting andresponding to other students comments is graded. For this week’s discussion topic(s), visit the Discussion Board inBlackboard.AssignmentNoneSession 4 Centers/Tokyo: July 11 - 17Learning Objectives:After this session, the student will be able to:-Explain the concepts of agglomeration, spillovers and economies of scale.-Contrast and compare Miami, Sydney and Toronto in terms of globalization, concentration, and specialization.-Explain the changing global role and urban restructuring of Tokyo during the 1980s, especially the effect oftechnology on spatial organization.-Explain the bid-rent model of determining land valuation based on transportation costs.Course Content:Reading -- For this session read the following:Brugmann, Chapter 7Sassen, Chapter 4Chapters 17, 20, and 33 of BrennerMultimediaIntroduction to AgglomerationCenters/Tokyo slidesBid/Rent Model slidesDiscussion BoardEach Session you are required to participate in all Discussion Board forums. Your participation in both posting andresponding to other students comments is graded. For this week’s discussion topic(s), visit the Discussion Board inBlackboard.AssignmentIndividual Case Study, Part 2: Final Case Study is due by Sunday, July 17, 2011 at 11:59pm (central time). For moreinformation, click Assignments on the left navigation bar in Blackboard, and scroll to this assignment’s item.Session 5 Margins/Berlin: July 18 - 24Learning Objectives:After this session, the student will be able to: MPPA 452 The Global City
  6. 6. -Explain the concepts of the informal economy, earnings curve, polarization and Gini index.-Explain Sassen’s arguments on global labor migration, informal employment, and polarization, and contrast thesearguments with other leading experts’ opinions.-Discuss how the geography of industrial and commercial development leads to urban conflict and a struggle overurban space.Course Content:Reading -- For this session read the following:Brugmann, Chapter 5Sassen, Chapter 5Brenner, Chapters 13 and 40MultimediaMargins/Berlin slidesBid/Rent Model slidesDiscussion BoardEach Session you are required to participate in all Discussion Board forums. Your participation in both posting andresponding to other students comments is graded. For this week’s discussion topic(s), visit the Discussion Board inBlackboard.AssignmentMidterm Exam is due by Sunday, July 24, 2011 at 11:59pm (central time). For more information, click Assignmentson the left navigation bar in Blackboard, and scroll to this assignment’s item.Session 6 Ecologies/Stockholm: July 25 - 31Learning Objectives:After this session, the student will be able to:-Define the elements that collectively determine the sustainability of global cities.-Recognize and explain the local and global environmental impacts of urbanization and globalization.-Explain how sustainability can be assisted through economic incentives and disincentives such as congestionpricing and cap-and-trade programs.-Specify real-world examples of sustainability in action, their costs and potential benefits.Course Content:Reading -- For this session read the following:Brugmann, Chapters 10, 11 and 12Sassen, Chapter 6 MPPA 452 The Global City
  7. 7. Brenner, Chapter 21MultimediaEcologies/Stockholm slidesDiscussion BoardEach Session you are required to participate in all Discussion Board forums. Your participation in both posting andresponding to other students comments is graded. For this week’s discussion topic(s), visit the Discussion Board inBlackboard.AssignmentGroup Case Study, Part 1: Resources is due by Sunday, July 31, 2011 at 11:59pm (central time). For moreinformation, click Assignments on the left navigation bar in Blackboard, and scroll to this assignment’s item.Session 7 Architectures/Los Angeles: August 1 – 7Learning Objectives:After this session, the student will be able to:-Explain how the attempt to “go global” is reflected in urban form.-Recognize how the built environment reflects the larger world system of economy, society and culture.-Explain how global media cities function as centers of creativity and contribute to the “production of lifestyleimages.”Course Content:Reading -- For this session read the following:Sassen, Chapter 7Brenner, Chapters 23, 37 and 39MultimediaArchitectures/Los Angeles slidesDiscussion BoardEach Session you are required to participate in all Discussion Board forums. Your participation in both posting andresponding to other students comments is graded. For this week’s discussion topic(s), visit the Discussion Board inBlackboard.AssignmentNoneSession 8 Crises/Detroit: August 8 - 14Learning Objectives:After this session, the student will be able to: MPPA 452 The Global City
  8. 8. -Explain what drives deindustrialization, the effect of deindustrialization on urban agglomerations, and how citieshave coped and fared with globalization, deindustrialization and global recession in the 20th and 21st centuries.-Define and contrast the stages of specialization, reorganization and decentralization in two major U.S. cities.-Evaluate the effects of local and global crises on cities, including 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, the global financial crisis,and the recent twin disasters in Japan.Course Content:Reading -- For this session read the following:Brugmann, Chapters 4 and 8Sassen, Chapter 8Brenner, Chapter 18MultimediaCrises/Detroit slidesDiscussion BoardEach Session you are required to participate in all Discussion Board forums. Your participation in both posting andresponding to other students comments is graded. For this week’s discussion topic(s), visit the Discussion Board inBlackboard.AssignmentGroup Case Study, Part 2: Presentations are due by Sunday, August 14, 2011 at 11:59pm (central time). For moreinformation, click Assignments on the left navigation bar in Blackboard, and scroll to this assignment’s item.Session 9 Frontiers/Shanghai: August 15 - 21Learning Objectives:After this session, the student will be able to:-Distinguish among different paths to globalization, including hyper global cities, emerging global cities, and globalcity states.-Assess how global circuits and 21st century urban forms have begun to reshape theories of global citydevelopment and urban studies.-Consider alternate paths to future city formation and sustainability.Course Content:Reading -- For this session read the following:Brugmann, Chapters 14 and 15Brenner, Chapters 26 and 48Kotkin, “Urban Legends,” Foreign Policy magazine, Sep/Oct 2010 (in Course Content) MPPA 452 The Global City
  9. 9. MultimediaFrontiers/Shanghai slidesDiscussion BoardEach Session you are required to participate in all Discussion Board forums. Your participation in both posting andresponding to other students comments is graded. For this week’s discussion topic(s), visit the Discussion Board inBlackboard.AssignmentFinal Exam is due by Monday, August 22, 2011 at 11:59pm (central time). For more information, click Assignmentson the left navigation bar in Blackboard, and scroll to this assignment’s item. MPPA 452 The Global City

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