RESUMES, HANDBILLS,
AND INTERVIEWING
HOW TO DEVELOP RESUMES THAT
GET ATTENTION, AND HOW TO
ADEQUATELY PREPARE FOR THE
INTE...
The past does not equal the
future…
 What has worked in the past in a job search will not
necessarily work today. In fact...
Resumes, Handbills, and
Interviews
 Perhaps the three areas of a job search that have
changed more than any other are wri...
Most job seekers shoot themselves in the foot by committing job search “sins”
that eliminate their candidacy right off the...
Resume MISTAKES: Typos.
 Typos: More than 85%
of the resumes we
receive have typos.
 Typos include
intermittent use of
p...
Resumes: Tell the truth
 Do not lie or even stretch the truth.
 You will be found out, and it may be after you are
alrea...
Don’t join the job search madness!
 In an article, entitled “Confessions of IT Job
Seekers”, Baseline Briefing shared the...
Resume MISTAKES: Simple is
critical
 Avoid ALL pictures, borders, images, shading, etc. These reduce
the number of times ...
RESUME SUICIDE
 ONLY use a business format email address such as
firstname.lastname@gmail.com or an acceptable
variation....
RESUME SUICIDE
 Avoid use of cliché’s, jargon, slang, vague or general
statements, and negative words.
 DO NOT send your...
Competitive Edge
 Get a smart phone (Android, iPhone, Windows). Be
reachable 24 x7 via phone and email. THIS IS
CRITICAL....
Competitive Edge
 You should automate your resume distribution. Not
doing this will prevent firms who have exclusive jobs...
Competitive Edge
 Most searches of resumes occur through keyword or buzzword
searches.
 The challenge is to get your res...
Competitive Edge
 STEP TWO: Change the font to 1 and turn font color to
white. Copy the block of data.
 STEP THREE:In th...
Old school VS New school
 The old way of
resume writing is to
simply tell the reader
what your scope of
responsibility wa...
RESUME Do’s and Don’ts
 Do NOT use an objective or summary. Screeners focus
on this to rule people out as quickly as poss...
RESUME Do’s and Don’ts
 NEVER write your resume in the 1st or 3rd person.
 Never have a 1 page resume or one that is mor...
RESUME Do’s and Don’ts
 NEVER use personal pronouns in a resume (I, my, me, etc).
 NEVER use the words ‘work with’ or ‘f...
RESUME Do’s and Don’ts
 NEVER include personal information, hobbies, salary
information, reasons for leaving, references,...
ACTION WORDS ARE A MUST!
 Action words create interest in your skills and draw attention to
your accomplishments. Most re...
RESUME Do’s and Don’ts
 Don’t tell people you are successful, dynamic, a
self-starter, etc. This is arrogant and alienate...
RESUME Do’s and Don’ts
 Identify the ‘profile’ they are hiring to. It is right in
front of you.
 Be findable: Populate t...
RESUME GOLD
 Develop ‘mini clips’ for YouTube or MySpace or
other sites where you have video clips that speak of
your Sub...
Cover Letters or Email Content
 NEVER claim to be a perfect fit for the job. There
usually are confidential or unpublishe...
Cover Letters or Email Content
 Never request time ‘to learn more’ about the opportunity, role,
company, etc.
 Your cove...
Cover Letters or Email Content
 Have ALL of your contact information in each
email you send out in the event the recipien...
Resumes, Cover letters, and
Emails
 ALWAYS tailor them for each role you apply for,
resume you send, and always include t...
Use a PULL APPROACH instead
of a PUSH APPROACH
 PUSH techniques are bad because they generally
alienate the reader or mak...
Use a PULL APPROACH instead
of a PUSH APPROACH
 Using a PULL approach is where you provide DATA that
triggers their hot b...
Google defines a handbill as a circular or flyer or
leaflet or promotional literature or advertisement. It
is all of these...
Handbills
 What they are: 1 page POWER documents.
 Resumes focus on where you have been. Handbills tell
others where you...
Handbills
 Where to use a handbill? An overlooked form of networking
are ‘roundtable’ or ‘round robin’ type networking ev...
Handbill Example
 NAME AND CONTACT INFORMATION (AS IF IN A RESUME):
 SEARCH OBJECTIVE:
 PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS:
 ...
Business Cards/Micro Handbills
 Micro Handbills are a creative way to use business
cards more effectively.
 Have a norma...
Handbills and Micro Handbills
 Whenever distributing your handbills and micro
handbills, stand out by:
 Being energetic,...
The Elevator Speech
 Only 5-10% of candidates have an effective ‘Elevator
Speech’.
 An elevator speech is a previously p...
ELEVATOR SPEECH
 It consists of no more than 130 words and lasts no longer than
30 seconds.
 It is simple and memorized....
ELEVATOR SPEECH
 They pique people’s curiosity to ask more questions.
 They aren’t just memorized. They are rehearsed an...
Most candidates today are ill prepared to interview.
They are unskilled as to how to interview, do little
research or prep...
Scheduling the Interview
 It should be as close to NOW as possible, whether it is
convenient or not.
 Most people over a...
Scheduling the Interview
 Make the RIGHT choices!
 Candidate delayed vacation to interview.
 Candidate came back early ...
Preparing for the Interview
 Do research! More than 75% of candidates are ruled
out due to lack of information they are a...
Understanding the Interview
 Get fewer offers.
 Get lower offers.
 Firms invest less in these people.
 Career progress...
Interview Wisdom
 Interview any place, any time, for any job (within
reason) placing no limitations.
 Focus on making pe...
Interview Wisdom
 Do not try and control the interview, interview cycle, or
interview timeline.
 You do not have control...
Interview Wisdom
 Assume the follower role in an interview and let
the person or people interviewing you assume the
lead ...
Interview Wisdom
 Always send thank you emails or notes after an interview.
 Proof read them thoroughly.
 Send them eac...
Nearly 70% of phone interviews result in failure.
More than 90% of the time, the person could have
succeeded and it was wi...
The Phone Interview
 Never use a cell phone to conduct a phone
interview.
 Eliminate all background noise and disruption...
The Phone Interview
 Understand that phone interviews are usually one way
interviews with little to no opportunity to ask...
The Phone Interview
 Have a mirror in front of you so can view and adjust your body
language. Smile continuously.
 Have ...
Long gone are the old days of winging it on
interviews. Today’s applicants will find
themselves competing with better, sma...
Face to Face Interviews
 Dress for success: Unless told not to, always dress
conservatively and in a suit with tie for th...
Face to Face Interviews
 Leave your cell phone, pager, etc. in the car.
 Do NOT wear any cologne or perfume.
 If you ar...
Face to Face Interviews
 Fill out the application completely (do NOT write ‘see
resume’). Where it asks for expected sala...
Face to Face Interviews
 Extend your research on the organization beyond
just a quick visit to their website.
 Be confid...
Face to Face Interviews
 NEVER say anything negative about anyone, anything,
especially previous employers, projects, co-...
Face to Face Interviews
 Bring 5 copies of your resume to the interview (unless
you know you need more).
 Get a business...
Face to Face Interviews
 Bring examples of work or portfolios that
demonstrate your skill to leave behind.
 Don’t brag o...
Face to Face Interviews
 Focus on humbly getting everyone you meet to fall in love
with you.
 Focus on being a beacon of...
Face to Face Interviews
 Listen to the QUESTION. LISTEN, LISTEN, LISTEN! If you are
unsure, ask them to rephrase it.
 Do...
Face to Face Interviews
 After answering each question, ask them:
 Does that answer your question?
 Would you like more...
INTERVIEW GOLD QUESTIONS
 How do I compare to others performing this role now?
 How do I compare to other candidates you...
INTERVIEW GOLD QUESTIONS
 What concerns do you have about my experience?
 What concerns do you have about my interview?
...
Interview Maturity: Do you have it?
 Don’t choke the baby! Most people choke their candidacy out of poor
emotional or int...
Use the Internet
 Use Google to do research on interviewing to improve
your skill.
 Search on ‘interview tips’.
 Use kn...
INTERVIEW GOLD
 If you are interested in the role and company, tell them.
Do NOT play poker and do NOT play hard to get.
...
INTERVIEW GOLD
 Organizations today do NOT hire the best candidates. They never
do.
 They hire the candidates who interv...
Recommended Reading
 Who Moved My Cheese by Dr. Spencer Johnson
and Ken Blanchard.
 Winning Job Interviews by Dr. Paul P...
Read what they are reading!
 High-Impact Interview Questions by Victoria A.
Hoevemeyer
 Hire With Your Head by Lou Adler...
GREG.DAVID@LAKA.COM
OFFICE: 312-528-9107
WWW.LINKEDIN.COM/IN/GREGDAVID
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/GREGDAVIDLAKA
WWW.TWITTER.COM/GREG...
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Resumes, Handbills, And Interviewing: Adapting to the "new rules" of the "new" job market by Greg David of Laka & Company

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Resumes, Handbills, and Interviews: How to avoid the mistakes that cost you the job offer, use techniques to shorten your job search timeline, and win the offer by edging out your competition.

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Resumes, Handbills, And Interviewing: Adapting to the "new rules" of the "new" job market by Greg David of Laka & Company

  1. 1. RESUMES, HANDBILLS, AND INTERVIEWING HOW TO DEVELOP RESUMES THAT GET ATTENTION, AND HOW TO ADEQUATELY PREPARE FOR THE INTERVIEW PROCESS. Greg David, Laka & Company
  2. 2. The past does not equal the future…  What has worked in the past in a job search will not necessarily work today. In fact, most previous job search activities that you have performed will likely yield poor results, and when they do, the activity is likely to be highly competitive with little chance of a positive outcome in a short period of time.  However the good news is that you can achieve positive results if you know how to adapt to this new marketplace.
  3. 3. Resumes, Handbills, and Interviews  Perhaps the three areas of a job search that have changed more than any other are writing and submitting resumes, developing ‘handbills’ for use in networking events, and interviewing in the most competitive marketplace of your lifetime.  Today you will learn the common mistakes that significantly lengthen a job search, and the successful strategies to shorten your job search timeline while yielding more positive results.
  4. 4. Most job seekers shoot themselves in the foot by committing job search “sins” that eliminate their candidacy right off the bat. RESUMES: THROW OUT THE “OLD RULES” One rule is still true: Your resume is the first impression that you make on others. It must be accurate, and flawless.
  5. 5. Resume MISTAKES: Typos.  Typos: More than 85% of the resumes we receive have typos.  Typos include intermittent use of periods, and Overcapitalization.  Most firms will rule you out for a single typo.  Have your resume proof read by a professional.  Do NOT rely on spell- check.  Watch out for fragments, run-on sentences, and other common grammatical errors.
  6. 6. Resumes: Tell the truth  Do not lie or even stretch the truth.  You will be found out, and it may be after you are already working for the organization.  People are regularly terminated weeks, months, and even years after being hired for lying.
  7. 7. Don’t join the job search madness!  In an article, entitled “Confessions of IT Job Seekers”, Baseline Briefing shared the following:  23% of IT workers say it's fine to participate in underhanded or otherwise "out of the ordinary" tactics to get a job.  15% say such tactics are necessary because the job market is so tough.  Over 20% say they're fine with claiming someone else's work as their own.  32% of workers would create a problem so they could fix it and earn brownie points.
  8. 8. Resume MISTAKES: Simple is critical  Avoid ALL pictures, borders, images, shading, etc. These reduce the number of times your resume is put into a database for consideration.  NEVER put your contact information into the header or footer. NEVER.  ALWAYS have your contact information on each page of the resume. This includes LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, etc links.  Make sure you are not mixing up present and past tense in current and prior scopes of responsibility.
  9. 9. RESUME SUICIDE  ONLY use a business format email address such as firstname.lastname@gmail.com or an acceptable variation.  Never use AOL, YAHOO, SBCGLOBAL, or EARTHLINK. Use Google’s gmail for email.  DO NOT have anything but a professional headshot on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, etc.
  10. 10. RESUME SUICIDE  Avoid use of cliché’s, jargon, slang, vague or general statements, and negative words.  DO NOT send your resume repeatedly to the same firm, or apply online to multiple jobs at the same organization. You will get blackballed.  DO NOT make others go to a link to view or download your resume. It should always be attached and copy and pasted into the body of the email.
  11. 11. Competitive Edge  Get a smart phone (Android, iPhone, Windows). Be reachable 24 x7 via phone and email. THIS IS CRITICAL.  Use LiveInbox to manage all email correspondence, files exchanged, communication and meeting history.  Copy and paste your resume into the body of each email so the reader does not have to take more time to read it, and also to automate your inclusion in others’ address books and applicant tracking systems.
  12. 12. Competitive Edge  You should automate your resume distribution. Not doing this will prevent firms who have exclusive jobs from knowing who you are.  You MUST be in the proprietary databases of all the hiring organizations, resume databases, and recruitment firms BEFORE they have a job you fit. BEFORE!  Use automated resume robots or spiders to accomplish this. One that will give you a 10% discount through this link is http://www.resumespider.com/?dcode=914902
  13. 13. Competitive Edge  Most searches of resumes occur through keyword or buzzword searches.  The challenge is to get your resume to come up more often, higher in the search returns, with a more favorable statistical ranking.  STEP ONE: Type a list of keywords that others would use to search for someone like you. Also write down as many of the keywords or buzzwords that firms use in their job description requirements when they look for someone like you.
  14. 14. Competitive Edge  STEP TWO: Change the font to 1 and turn font color to white. Copy the block of data.  STEP THREE:In the margins of your resume (wherever there is currently blank space, but NOT at the end of your resume) proceed to paste the data. Repetition is your friend!  This ‘trick’ will substantially improve your ‘resume ranking’ when firms do resume searches and increase the number of times you are considered.
  15. 15. Old school VS New school  The old way of resume writing is to simply tell the reader what your scope of responsibility was.  Often written “Responsible for….”  This is boring and unlikely to get results.  The better way to write a resume is to put ACTION and ATTENTION getting words (be careful to avoid FLUFF).  Sentences often begin with an action oriented verb: “Lowered, Increased, Improved, etc”. The rule of thumb is to begin each bullet or sentence with an action verb.
  16. 16. RESUME Do’s and Don’ts  Do NOT use an objective or summary. Screeners focus on this to rule people out as quickly as possible.  You may use an objective if it is surgically strategic, but you still run the risk of hurting yourself with the ‘confidential or unwritten requirements’.  DO use a reverse chronological method. Avoid accomplishment or functional focused resumes.
  17. 17. RESUME Do’s and Don’ts  NEVER write your resume in the 1st or 3rd person.  Never have a 1 page resume or one that is more than 4 pages. Only focus on the last 15 years of experience.  ALWAYS have your contact info on every page, but NEVER have it in the header or footer of the resume.  ALWAYS provide your resume as a txt and MS Word doc ONLY. Always send a resume as a 2010 version.
  18. 18. RESUME Do’s and Don’ts  NEVER use personal pronouns in a resume (I, my, me, etc).  NEVER use the words ‘work with’ or ‘familiar with’.  NEVER use the phrase ‘till date’ or ‘to date’ when putting dates in a resume.  ALWAYS quantify where possible (i.e. dates, figures, percentages, numbers of quantity, increases, decreases, etc).  NEVER bold or underline for emphasis.
  19. 19. RESUME Do’s and Don’ts  NEVER include personal information, hobbies, salary information, reasons for leaving, references, or the phrase ‘references available upon request’.  Do not copy and paste responsibilities from one job to another even if it is the same scope of responsibility.  Do not repeat the same words over and over. Use a thesaurus.  Do not leave off dates, stretch dates to cover gaps.
  20. 20. ACTION WORDS ARE A MUST!  Action words create interest in your skills and draw attention to your accomplishments. Most resumes fail to use them, and are boring to read.  Action verbs by category: http://www.stetson.edu/administration/career-and-professional- development/media/pdfs/action_verbs_and_transferable_skills.pdf  Action words alphabetically: http://www.elancolibrary.org/elanco/lib/elanco/images/employment/ resume_cover_letters/action_verbs.pdf  Avoid assisted, contributed, supported, successfully. Too vague. Also avoid ‘responsible for’. Use verbs.
  21. 21. RESUME Do’s and Don’ts  Don’t tell people you are successful, dynamic, a self-starter, etc. This is arrogant and alienates the reader. Use ‘award winning’ and lose.  If you will mail your resume, never fold it. Send it in a 9x12 labeled envelope.  Education should be included after your work experience unless you are just entering the work force.
  22. 22. RESUME Do’s and Don’ts  Identify the ‘profile’ they are hiring to. It is right in front of you.  Be findable: Populate the “right” sites with your content.  Know how to do resume SEO (Search Engine Optimization).
  23. 23. RESUME GOLD  Develop ‘mini clips’ for YouTube or MySpace or other sites where you have video clips that speak of your Subject Matter Expertise (SME).  Develop articles and whitepapers that you have made available to the public on the Internet.  Provide links to these in your resume so a reader can literally click and go to your RESUME GOLD.
  24. 24. Cover Letters or Email Content  NEVER claim to be a perfect fit for the job. There usually are confidential or unpublished requirements for the role. It makes you look foolish.  NEVER demand that they call you at their earliest convenience. This makes you look arrogant.  NEVER indicate that you will follow up with a personal phone call. If you choose to do this, then do it, but do not give them notice. You will alienate yourself from most recipients before you even speak to them.
  25. 25. Cover Letters or Email Content  Never request time ‘to learn more’ about the opportunity, role, company, etc.  Your cover letter or email content is an opportunity to highlight what you perceive to be strengths, but it is critical that you narrow your strengths to the job description or information provided.  Often, it is the very information that most job seekers highlight that tends to cause the reader to lose interest.
  26. 26. Cover Letters or Email Content  Have ALL of your contact information in each email you send out in the event the recipient cannot open an attached file or to make it easier/faster for them to contact you.  Have your email configured so that every time you respond to someone, it includes your signature with ALL of your contact information. This also makes it easier/faster for someone to get to you.
  27. 27. Resumes, Cover letters, and Emails  ALWAYS tailor them for each role you apply for, resume you send, and always include the resume as an attachment when doing future correspondence.  Keep a diary or log of each time you send a resume, and make sure you do not send and resend to people or firms over and over.  Do not use templates from others.
  28. 28. Use a PULL APPROACH instead of a PUSH APPROACH  PUSH techniques are bad because they generally alienate the reader or make the applicant look less favorable. Anything that generally will be seen as ‘pushy’ by the recipient is a PUSH technique.  Candidates who use PUSH techniques send signals that they are outdated, no longer relevant, uneducated as to the new rules of the marketplace, desperate, and unwanted.
  29. 29. Use a PULL APPROACH instead of a PUSH APPROACH  Using a PULL approach is where you provide DATA that triggers their hot buttons or search criteria.  You want to PULL them towards you based on how their hot buttons jump off your resume.  Cast a net that is wide and deep when you disperse your resume. You must also make each resume submittal surgically strategic. Lastly, you must LURE them to you by your use of RESUME GOLD, and by being reachable 24x7.
  30. 30. Google defines a handbill as a circular or flyer or leaflet or promotional literature or advertisement. It is all of these things, it is wonderful, and it is critical for use in networking. Handbills—What are they?
  31. 31. Handbills  What they are: 1 page POWER documents.  Resumes focus on where you have been. Handbills tell others where you want to go.  They are marketing focused meaning that they promote you as one would promote a product or service.
  32. 32. Handbills  Where to use a handbill? An overlooked form of networking are ‘roundtable’ or ‘round robin’ type networking events.  Often, people shy away from these because they are uncomfortable or unfamiliar with them. If this is you, get out of your comfort zone, and get good at this activity.  People who become very good at these types of networking events meet a large number of people in a short period of time. You can build armies of supporters quickly and efficiently at a low cost.
  33. 33. Handbill Example  NAME AND CONTACT INFORMATION (AS IF IN A RESUME):  SEARCH OBJECTIVE:  PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS:  INDUSTRY EXPERTISE:  POSITIONS HELD / COMPANY:  ATTRIBUTES OF TARGET BUSINESSES:  TARGET COMPANIES:  EDUCATION:
  34. 34. Business Cards/Micro Handbills  Micro Handbills are a creative way to use business cards more effectively.  Have a normal business card on the front. On the back, you have essentially a micro handbill, where you assemble bullets of information on your skills.
  35. 35. Handbills and Micro Handbills  Whenever distributing your handbills and micro handbills, stand out by:  Being energetic, radiate positive enthusiasm, and smile continuously. You will be a stark contrast to your ‘competition’.  Speak clearly, and have a ‘story’ or elevator speech prepared, and well practiced.
  36. 36. The Elevator Speech  Only 5-10% of candidates have an effective ‘Elevator Speech’.  An elevator speech is a previously prepared summary of the VALUE someone brings to an organization.  Of the last 50+ elevator speeches I have observed, not a single one shared value. All they did was verbalize what they wanted, or what the functional job they previously had was.  THIS IS NOT AN ELEVATOR SPEECH.
  37. 37. ELEVATOR SPEECH  It consists of no more than 130 words and lasts no longer than 30 seconds.  It is simple and memorized. It tells someone what you do from a VALUE perspective.  I project manage computer programming is NOT a value statement.  I am an accountant is NOT a value statement.  “I help organizations hire better people faster and easier and retain them longer than they do now while spending less time and money” IS a value statement.
  38. 38. ELEVATOR SPEECH  They pique people’s curiosity to ask more questions.  They aren’t just memorized. They are rehearsed and delivered in an Academy Award winning fashion.  Body language enhances the verbalized content.  Content is filled with clear, real, desirable value that pulls the audience in with their desire to hear more.  Positive energy and passion reinforce the value message.
  39. 39. Most candidates today are ill prepared to interview. They are unskilled as to how to interview, do little research or preparation, and are commonly ruled out due to their performance, not their job skill. As a result, most are out of work much longer than necessary. Preparing For The Interview
  40. 40. Scheduling the Interview  It should be as close to NOW as possible, whether it is convenient or not.  Most people over analyze the best day, time, etc. to have the interview.  Most people think of what is currently on their plate when scheduling an interview.  These are common competitive blunders. People who do this do not win as many job offers.
  41. 41. Scheduling the Interview  Make the RIGHT choices!  Candidate delayed vacation to interview.  Candidate came back early from honeymoon to interview.  Candidate came back in middle of trip to Disney World to interview then flew back---at own expense.  Candidate went on an out of state interview even though it conflicted with her wedding anniversary.
  42. 42. Preparing for the Interview  Do research! More than 75% of candidates are ruled out due to lack of information they are able to provide on the organization.  Be prepared! Have well written questions to ask on the organization, industry, role, etc.  Be prepared! When is the last time you read books on how to interview, or better yet, interviewing from a hiring manager’s perspective (i.e. behavioral interviewing).
  43. 43. Understanding the Interview  Get fewer offers.  Get lower offers.  Firms invest less in these people.  Career progression slows in time.  In demand only when job market is strong.  Network is smaller.  Network is less powerful.  Periods of little control over career.  Job searches stressful at times.  Get more job offers.  Get higher job offers.  Hit career fast track.  Career progression strong and consistent.  In demand regardless of health of job market.  Network is large.  Network is powerful.  More control over life of career.  Job searches rarely stressful. The purpose of interviews is for them to sell me. The purpose of interviews is for me to sell them on my value.
  44. 44. Interview Wisdom  Interview any place, any time, for any job (within reason) placing no limitations.  Focus on making people fall in love with you.  Say ‘no’ only when you get a job offer.  Make everyone you meet a hero of yours.  Your network will be large and powerful.  Should you ever ‘hit the street’, you will be picked up quickly.  You will end up with job options your peers never get.
  45. 45. Interview Wisdom  Do not try and control the interview, interview cycle, or interview timeline.  You do not have control nor leverage until the time of an offer. In a competitive job market, even then there is little control or leverage.  Listen, listen, listen! Nearly ¼ of qualified candidates are ruled out because they failed to answer the questions.  Don’t tell stories or tell them what YOU want them to know. Just answer the question briefly, ask if they want more detail, and then ask if you answered their question.
  46. 46. Interview Wisdom  Assume the follower role in an interview and let the person or people interviewing you assume the lead role.  Do NOT hijack the interview or try to take the reins. They do NOT belong to you.  Let them have the control and focus on providing the answers to the questions posed.
  47. 47. Interview Wisdom  Always send thank you emails or notes after an interview.  Proof read them thoroughly.  Send them each time regardless of the number of interviews in the cycle.  Send them to each person.  Do NOT send the same thank you to each person.  Include examples of work, or articles or whitepapers that may be helpful to the recipient.
  48. 48. Nearly 70% of phone interviews result in failure. More than 90% of the time, the person could have succeeded and it was within their control. The Phone Interview
  49. 49. The Phone Interview  Never use a cell phone to conduct a phone interview.  Eliminate all background noise and disruption.  Have a copy of your resume in front of you.  Sit, don’t stand.
  50. 50. The Phone Interview  Understand that phone interviews are usually one way interviews with little to no opportunity to ask questions.  Demonstrate your ability to be flexible and “play well with others”.  This is also of benefit to you since it eliminates the investment of your time, effort, and resources normally invested in a face to face interview.  Listen for checklist questions!!!
  51. 51. The Phone Interview  Have a mirror in front of you so can view and adjust your body language. Smile continuously.  Have research data in front of you on the firm, industry, etc. If possible, have a copy of the job description. Really know this information well.  Have an abundance of intelligent questions written and prepared (nearly ¼ of all candidates are ruled out for not asking good questions).  Demonstrate interest, energy, and passion for the role (nearly ¼ of all candidates are ruled out for showing lack of interest).
  52. 52. Long gone are the old days of winging it on interviews. Today’s applicants will find themselves competing with better, smarter, more savvy candidates who are better prepared, better networked, and less expensive. Success can be yours if you know the critical factors of success and are well prepared. Face to Face Interview Preparation
  53. 53. Face to Face Interviews  Dress for success: Unless told not to, always dress conservatively and in a suit with tie for the men, and dress or women’s pant suit for the ladies.  Do NOT dress in business casual or casual attire unless you are told to.  Someone sharing that you can come to the next round in more casual attire might be a test.  LISTEN FOR CHECKLIST QUESTIONS!!!!!!!
  54. 54. Face to Face Interviews  Leave your cell phone, pager, etc. in the car.  Do NOT wear any cologne or perfume.  If you are a smoker, do NOT smoke for 2 hours before the interview----wear the patch.  If you are late, it is the kiss of death.  Arrive no earlier than 15 minutes.
  55. 55. Face to Face Interviews  Fill out the application completely (do NOT write ‘see resume’). Where it asks for expected salary, put ‘open’ or ‘negotiable’.  Treat every person you meet well. Every person.  Act as if someone is always watching. In the parking lot. The elevator. The lobby. Always. Never let your guard down.  Do not ask about salary or benefits until HR broaches the topic.
  56. 56. Face to Face Interviews  Extend your research on the organization beyond just a quick visit to their website.  Be confident with a good handshake and ‘look them in the eye’ confidence.  This is a chance to expand your network and make new friends. The long term value is enormous.
  57. 57. Face to Face Interviews  NEVER say anything negative about anyone, anything, especially previous employers, projects, co-workers, etc.  NEVER discuss anything that is sensitive to the general population such as politics, religion, sex, natural disasters, catastrophic events, foreign affairs, etc. NEVER, NEVER, NEVER!!!!  Never take your interview game face off even if you begin to become “old friends”. NEVER, NEVER, NEVER!!!
  58. 58. Face to Face Interviews  Bring 5 copies of your resume to the interview (unless you know you need more).  Get a business card from each person you meet with (write down their name and title and email address if they do not have a card with them).  Bring intelligent prepared questions to the interview broken into several categories (i.e. industry, organization, role, why do you work here, etc).
  59. 59. Face to Face Interviews  Bring examples of work or portfolios that demonstrate your skill to leave behind.  Don’t brag or name drop----this is the sure way to ensure a loss.  Don’t needlessly disclose that you are actively interviewing with other firms unless asked. Share the information humbly.
  60. 60. Face to Face Interviews  Focus on humbly getting everyone you meet to fall in love with you.  Focus on being a beacon of enthusiasm, positive energy, and someone who is solutions focused.  If you do not know the answer to a question, simply tell the interviewer. Do not lie, and do not guess.  A great way to respond when probed about a skill you do not have is: “I have always wanted to _______. Would I get to do that in this role?”
  61. 61. Face to Face Interviews  Listen to the QUESTION. LISTEN, LISTEN, LISTEN! If you are unsure, ask them to rephrase it.  Do NOT go off on tangents. You are virtually guaranteeing yourself a loss.  If you know that there may be a ‘long’ answer, ask the interviewer if they want the short or long answer. Then proceed carefully.  The clock is ticking. Do NOT monopolize the interview or talk too much because you will prevent the interviewer from completing their prepared interview questions. If they fail to get through them, you are likely to be ruled out.
  62. 62. Face to Face Interviews  After answering each question, ask them:  Does that answer your question?  Would you like more detail?  Would you like me to send examples of this to you (if relevant and applicable)?
  63. 63. INTERVIEW GOLD QUESTIONS  How do I compare to others performing this role now?  How do I compare to other candidates you have interviewed?  How do I compare to your ideal or dream candidate?  How do I compare to the person that was in this role previously?
  64. 64. INTERVIEW GOLD QUESTIONS  What concerns do you have about my experience?  What concerns do you have about my interview?  What can I do to improve my interview performance?  How may I improve my candidacy?  How can I alleviate concerns that you may have?  What gaps do you see in my experience?  What strengths do you feel I have for this role?
  65. 65. Interview Maturity: Do you have it?  Don’t choke the baby! Most people choke their candidacy out of poor emotional or interview maturity or desperation.  It is impossible to get them to hire you by following up over and over.  It is possible to follow up too much and ‘turn them off’.  When in doubt, channel your nervous energy and anxiety into things you can control.  Whatever timelines they establish and share, rarely will those timelines be accurate. When in doubt, LEAVE THEM ALONE!
  66. 66. Use the Internet  Use Google to do research on interviewing to improve your skill.  Search on ‘interview tips’.  Use known resources like www.crains.com and www.wsj.com and www.cnn.com and www.hoovers.com to do research on firms.  Target industry magazines and journals and get your hands on annual reports to perform due diligence.
  67. 67. INTERVIEW GOLD  If you are interested in the role and company, tell them. Do NOT play poker and do NOT play hard to get.  The number of firms passing on qualified candidates who commit this ‘interview sin’ is at an all time high.  If you like them, tell them and be sincere, genuine, and be able to articulate when asked, WHY IT APPEALS TO YOU.  Make sure your response is NOT fluff and NOT vague.
  68. 68. INTERVIEW GOLD  Organizations today do NOT hire the best candidates. They never do.  They hire the candidates who interview the best.  That is great news for you as you have complete control over how well you interview.  Take ownership and be accountable for your interviewing success.  Become the best interviewer and you will be the one that wins the offer more often, with greater success.
  69. 69. Recommended Reading  Who Moved My Cheese by Dr. Spencer Johnson and Ken Blanchard.  Winning Job Interviews by Dr. Paul Powers  Acing the Interview by Tony Beshara  Interviewing Skills by Tim Hindle  Competency-Based Interviews by Robin Kessler  You’re Hired! by Lorne Epstein  Instant Interviews by Jeffrey G. Allen
  70. 70. Read what they are reading!  High-Impact Interview Questions by Victoria A. Hoevemeyer  Hire With Your Head by Lou Adler  Crisp Behavioral-Based Interviewing by Terry L. Fitzwater  96 Great Interview Questions to Ask Before You Hire by Paul Falcone
  71. 71. GREG.DAVID@LAKA.COM OFFICE: 312-528-9107 WWW.LINKEDIN.COM/IN/GREGDAVID WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/GREGDAVIDLAKA WWW.TWITTER.COM/GREGDAVIDLAKA WWW.PINTEREST.COM/GREGDAVIDLAKA It is not what you know. It is not who you know. It is who knows you. Who thinks of you when they have a need? Greg David Laka & Company

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