Pacing <ul><li>Day 1: Slides 1-19 </li></ul><ul><li>Day 2: Slides 20-45 </li></ul><ul><li>Day 2.5: Slides 46-54 </li></ul>
Wuthering Heights
John Donne Death be not proud… <ul><li>Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art...
Wuthering Heights <ul><li>Male </li></ul><ul><li>Past </li></ul><ul><li>Art </li></ul><ul><li>Love </li></ul><ul><li>Femal...
Form follows function <ul><li>Male </li></ul><ul><li>Past </li></ul><ul><li>Art </li></ul><ul><li>Love </li></ul><ul><li>F...
 
How is this comic both simple and complex? <ul><li>In what ways is  passion  simple? </li></ul><ul><li>How is it also comp...
&quot;Wuthering&quot; is a local word from northern England, meaning wild, exposed, storm- blown
Genre(less) <ul><li>Gothic adventure or a Victorian romance? </li></ul><ul><li>WH  blows aside attempts to define it and <...
<ul><li>However, contains some  Romantic  influences,  but  written in 1847, after the peak of the Romantic era </li></ul>...
 
Unique and Ahead of its Time (Avante garde) <ul><li>Is a novel that works as drama (dialog-driven) </li></ul><ul><li>Epic–...
Art imitates Life <ul><li>Brontë’s mother died when Emily was three; protagonist is an orphan </li></ul><ul><li>Branwell, ...
 
Blurring of Time <ul><li>Every story must have a beginning, middle, and end… </li></ul><ul><li>just not necessarily in tha...
 
 
Time <ul><li>Narrative style and overlapping names create a disorienting effect on the reader’s sense of time </li></ul><u...
Past is Present  (Life) <ul><li>Past </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Northern England moors isolated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Larg...
Past is Present  (Art) <ul><li>Present time </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lockwood arrives at WH </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mistak...
Setting:  Lay of the Land
The Heights Thrushcross Grange Penistone Crag (Cliff) Gimmerton Kirk (church)
Art imitates Life <ul><li>The moorland that Emily Brontë describes is a combination of areas that she knew: </li></ul><ul>...
Setting: Exposed Isolation <ul><li>Wuthering Heights is in an extremely exposed position on the moors </li></ul><ul><li>No...
Map of the Moors The Earnshaws The Lintons
Characters
<ul><li>Morose Teenager </li></ul>Heathcliff Bitter  Adult
<ul><li>(1771, age 7) ...I had a peep at a dirty, ragged, black-haired child; big enough both to walk and talk: indeed, it...
<ul><li>(1783, age 19) A ray fell on his features; the cheeks were sallow, and half covered with black whiskers; the brows...
Heathcliff <ul><li>Emily Brontë’s sister Charlotte described the character: </li></ul><ul><li>“ Heathcliff, indeed, stands...
Heathcliff as Anti-Hero <ul><li>Protagonist, yes– hero, no </li></ul><ul><li>Although intense and engaging, he remains cru...
Catherine  (Cathy) <ul><li>Catherine Earnshaw, daughter of old Mr. Earnshaw </li></ul><ul><li>Later known as Catherine Lin...
<ul><li>“ It was enough to try the temper of a saint, such senseless, wicked rages! There [Catherine] lay dashing her head...
“ Nelly, I  am  Heathcliff!”
“ He’s more myself than I am.” “ His soul and mine are the same.”
Um, you might call us  co-dependen t.
WH Monty Python Style
<ul><li>Name may have come from Ellen Nussey, a close friend of the Brontës  </li></ul><ul><li>Both a character and one of...
Mr. Lockwood <ul><li>Has rented Thrushcross Grange and pays a snow-covered visit to his landlord, Heathcliff </li></ul><ul...
Mr. Lockwood <ul><li>Upperclass– vain, pompous </li></ul><ul><li>Prose is more complex than Nelly’s </li></ul><ul><li>Func...
Hindley <ul><li>Son of (old) Mr. Heathcliff Earnshaw </li></ul><ul><li>Brother to Catherine (he’s 8 yrs. older) </li></ul>...
Heathcliff <ul><li>Gypsy? Orphan </li></ul><ul><li>No last name </li></ul><ul><li>Adoptive brother to Catherine & Hindley ...
The Lintons <ul><li>(Old) Mr. Linton </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Father to Edgar & Isabella </li></ul></ul><ul><li>m. (Old) Mrs....
Lesser or Later Characters <ul><li>(Old) Mr. Earnshaw  m. Mrs. Earnshaw </li></ul><ul><li>Zillah </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hei...
Map of the Moors The Earnshaws The Lintons
Narrative Structure: Simple… <ul><li>Prologue in present time (chs. 1-3) </li></ul><ul><li>Heathcliff’s childhood in fb (c...
… yet complex
… just the way passion really is.
Function of Framed Narrative Structure <ul><li>No omniscient narrator to explain characters’ feelings, so the language is ...
Lockwood vs. Nelly: Opposing and Complimentary Perspectives <ul><li>Both fall under personal prejudices and moral judgment...
Wuthering Heights &quot;Wuthering&quot; is a local word from northern England, meaning wild, exposed, storm- blown
Content and Form <ul><li>Wuthering Heights  blows aside attempts to define it </li></ul><ul><li>Unrestrained narrative str...
Film Versions of  Wuthering Heights <ul><li>Wuthering Heights . Director: A. V. Bramble. Actors: Milton Rosmer, Colette Br...
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Wuthering Intro

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Wuthering Intro

  1. 2. Pacing <ul><li>Day 1: Slides 1-19 </li></ul><ul><li>Day 2: Slides 20-45 </li></ul><ul><li>Day 2.5: Slides 46-54 </li></ul>
  2. 3. Wuthering Heights
  3. 4. John Donne Death be not proud… <ul><li>Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so, For, those, whom thou thinkst thou dost overthrow Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me. From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be Much pleasure, then from thee much more must flow And soonest our best men with thee do go Rest of their bones and soul's delivery. Thou art slave to Fate, Chance, kings, and desperate men, And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell, And poppies or charms can make us sleep as well And better than thy stroke; why swellst thou then; One short sleep past, we wake eternally, And death shall be no more; death, thou shalt die! </li></ul><ul><li>Holy Sonnets X, circa 1610 </li></ul>
  4. 5. Wuthering Heights <ul><li>Male </li></ul><ul><li>Past </li></ul><ul><li>Art </li></ul><ul><li>Love </li></ul><ul><li>Female </li></ul><ul><li>Present </li></ul><ul><li>Life </li></ul><ul><li>Hate </li></ul>
  5. 6. Form follows function <ul><li>Male </li></ul><ul><li>Past </li></ul><ul><li>Art </li></ul><ul><li>Love </li></ul><ul><li>Female </li></ul><ul><li>Present </li></ul><ul><li>Life </li></ul><ul><li>Hate </li></ul>
  6. 8. How is this comic both simple and complex? <ul><li>In what ways is passion simple? </li></ul><ul><li>How is it also complicated? </li></ul>
  7. 9. &quot;Wuthering&quot; is a local word from northern England, meaning wild, exposed, storm- blown
  8. 10. Genre(less) <ul><li>Gothic adventure or a Victorian romance? </li></ul><ul><li>WH blows aside attempts to define it and </li></ul><ul><li>does not really belong to either (or any?) </li></ul><ul><li>category. </li></ul>
  9. 11. <ul><li>However, contains some Romantic influences, but written in 1847, after the peak of the Romantic era </li></ul><ul><li>Brontë was a gently bred Victorian woman but expresses her disdain for the accepted social constraints on class and gender </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Many male characters are weak and pathetic, while leading female character is strong and sometimes cruel. </li></ul><ul><li>Thus , WH is Emily Brontë’s singular vision and cannot be easily categorized </li></ul>
  10. 13. Unique and Ahead of its Time (Avante garde) <ul><li>Is a novel that works as drama (dialog-driven) </li></ul><ul><li>Epic– spans three generations (Earnshaws & Lintons) </li></ul><ul><li>Has no central narrator </li></ul><ul><li>Protagonist is an anti-hero (prefigures modernism) </li></ul><ul><li>Explores the messy– and very real-- overlap between love and hate (anti-Romantic) </li></ul><ul><li>Passion trumps morality (anti-Victorian) </li></ul>
  11. 14. Art imitates Life <ul><li>Brontë’s mother died when Emily was three; protagonist is an orphan </li></ul><ul><li>Branwell, Emily’s brother, died of alcoholism and drug abuse; ????? dies the same way </li></ul><ul><li>Brontë’s older sisters died of tuberculosis; ????? dies of tuberculosis. </li></ul><ul><li>Brontë was born in the moors of northern England; WH is set there </li></ul>
  12. 16. Blurring of Time <ul><li>Every story must have a beginning, middle, and end… </li></ul><ul><li>just not necessarily in that order. </li></ul>
  13. 19. Time <ul><li>Narrative style and overlapping names create a disorienting effect on the reader’s sense of time </li></ul><ul><li>Like the wind on the moors itself, time moves freely forward and backward throughout the novel </li></ul>
  14. 20. Past is Present (Life) <ul><li>Past </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Northern England moors isolated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Largely cut off from Victorian zeitgeist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thus past continues in present for Brontë </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Present </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Writing style is unprecedented </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And avante garde (the future now) </li></ul></ul>
  15. 21. Past is Present (Art) <ul><li>Present time </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lockwood arrives at WH </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mistakes second generation for first </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Immediately see a ghost– our future (temporal time is overcome) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Past time </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nelly tells story to Lockwood of WH in flashback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Worst of the past dies off and best endures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oedipus complex at family level </li></ul></ul>
  16. 22. Setting: Lay of the Land
  17. 23. The Heights Thrushcross Grange Penistone Crag (Cliff) Gimmerton Kirk (church)
  18. 24. Art imitates Life <ul><li>The moorland that Emily Brontë describes is a combination of areas that she knew: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The moor around Haworth in West Yorkshire where she spent most of her life </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Shibden valley where she worked </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Haworth was likely the intended position for Wuthering Heights and the Gimmerton valley: </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In chapter 4, Mr. Earnshaw walks sixty miles to Liverpool from the Heights </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The real distance from Haworth to Liverpool is 63 miles </li></ul></ul>
  19. 25. Setting: Exposed Isolation <ul><li>Wuthering Heights is in an extremely exposed position on the moors </li></ul><ul><li>Northern side of a hilltop also known as Wuthering Heights (or &quot;the Heights&quot;) which blocks any view of Thrushcross Grange </li></ul><ul><li>Four-mile walk from Thrushcross Grange </li></ul><ul><li>Nearest village is deep in Gimmerton valley </li></ul>
  20. 26. Map of the Moors The Earnshaws The Lintons
  21. 27. Characters
  22. 28. <ul><li>Morose Teenager </li></ul>Heathcliff Bitter Adult
  23. 29. <ul><li>(1771, age 7) ...I had a peep at a dirty, ragged, black-haired child; big enough both to walk and talk: indeed, its face looked older than Catherine's; yet when it was set on its feet, it only stared round, and repeated over and over again some gibberish that nobody could understand. </li></ul><ul><li>(Childhood, cont.) I wondered often what my master saw to admire so much in the sullen boy; who never, to my recollection, repaid his indulgence by any sign of gratitude. He was not insolent to his benefactor, he was simply insensible; though knowing perfectly the hold he had on his heart, and conscious he had only to speak and all the house would be obliged to bend to his wishes. </li></ul><ul><li>(1777, age 13) Do you mark those two lines between your eyes; and those thick brows, that, instead of rising arched, sink in the middle; and that couple of black fiends, so deeply buried, who never open their windows boldly, but lurk glinting under them, like devil's spies? </li></ul><ul><li>(1780, age 16) In the first place, he had by that time lost the benefit of his early education: continual hard work, begun soon and concluded late, had extinguished any curiosity he once possessed in pursuit of knowledge, and any love for books or learning. His childhood's sense of superiority, instilled into him by the favours of old Mr. Earnshaw, was faded away... he acquired a slouching gait and ignoble look; his naturally reserved disposition was exaggerated into an almost idiotic excess of unsociable moroseness… </li></ul>http://www.wuthering-heights.co.uk/characters/images/heathcliff39.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.wuthering-heights.co.uk/characters/heathcliff.htm&h=120&w=100&sz=20&hl=en&start=21&sig2
  24. 30. <ul><li>(1783, age 19) A ray fell on his features; the cheeks were sallow, and half covered with black whiskers; the brows lowering, the eyes deep-set and singular. I remembered the eyes. </li></ul><ul><li>(1783, age 19) ...[Edgar] had sense to comprehend Heathcliff's disposition: to know that, though his exterior was altered, his mind was unchangeable and unchanged. </li></ul><ul><li>(1801, age 37) He is a dark-skinned gypsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure; and rather morose. </li></ul>http://www.wuthering-heights.co.uk/characters/images/heathcliff39.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.wuthering-heights.co.uk/characters/heathcliff.htm&h=120&w=100&sz=20&hl=en&start=21&sig2
  25. 31. Heathcliff <ul><li>Emily Brontë’s sister Charlotte described the character: </li></ul><ul><li>“ Heathcliff, indeed, stands unredeemed; never once swerving in his arrow-straight course to perdition…” </li></ul><ul><li>(Preface to the 1850 edition of Wuthering Heights ) </li></ul>
  26. 32. Heathcliff as Anti-Hero <ul><li>Protagonist, yes– hero, no </li></ul><ul><li>Although intense and engaging, he remains cruel and harsh throughout </li></ul><ul><li>Flat and static, not round or dynamic </li></ul><ul><li>Never learns or grows-- stays stuck in his misery </li></ul><ul><li>Thus, an entertaining and memorable protagonist, but not a hero </li></ul>
  27. 33. Catherine (Cathy) <ul><li>Catherine Earnshaw, daughter of old Mr. Earnshaw </li></ul><ul><li>Later known as Catherine Linton (after marriage) ** </li></ul><ul><li>Torn between H’s timeless love and E’s money/conventions (future vs. present) </li></ul><ul><li>Has a daughter named Catherine ** </li></ul><ul><li>We only learn of her through flashback ** </li></ul>
  28. 34. <ul><li>“ It was enough to try the temper of a saint, such senseless, wicked rages! There [Catherine] lay dashing her head against the arm of the sofa, and grinding her teeth, so that you might fancy she would crash them to splinters.” </li></ul><ul><li>(1784, age 18) </li></ul>Catherine (Cathy)
  29. 35. “ Nelly, I am Heathcliff!”
  30. 36. “ He’s more myself than I am.” “ His soul and mine are the same.”
  31. 37. Um, you might call us co-dependen t.
  32. 38. WH Monty Python Style
  33. 39. <ul><li>Name may have come from Ellen Nussey, a close friend of the Brontës </li></ul><ul><li>Both a character and one of the narrators </li></ul><ul><li>Youthful asst. caretaker for Catherine, Hindley, Heathcliff </li></ul><ul><li>Housekeeper first at Wuthering Heights and later Thrushcross Grange </li></ul><ul><li>Narrates “inside frame” to Lockwood– from inside out </li></ul>Ellen (Nelly) Dean
  34. 40. Mr. Lockwood <ul><li>Has rented Thrushcross Grange and pays a snow-covered visit to his landlord, Heathcliff </li></ul><ul><li>Gets snowed in at WH and discovers Catherine’s old books </li></ul><ul><li>Sees her ghost (?), becomes rattled but intrigued </li></ul><ul><li>Back at the Grange, asks housekeeper Nelly Dean to tell him the story of WH (flashback) </li></ul>
  35. 41. Mr. Lockwood <ul><li>Upperclass– vain, pompous </li></ul><ul><li>Prose is more complex than Nelly’s </li></ul><ul><li>Functions as a surrogate reader, asking questions and learning the history of Heathcliff, the Earnshaws and the Lintons from Nelly Dean </li></ul><ul><li>He is eyewitness to only 10% of story </li></ul><ul><li>Shows us how things are not (outside-in point of view) </li></ul><ul><li>Not from northern England, so he finds it difficult to understand the behaviors of the people he meets, but he is intrigued </li></ul>
  36. 42. Hindley <ul><li>Son of (old) Mr. Heathcliff Earnshaw </li></ul><ul><li>Brother to Catherine (he’s 8 yrs. older) </li></ul><ul><li>Same age as Nelly </li></ul><ul><li>Adoptive brother to Heathcliff </li></ul><ul><li>Forever jealous of father’s affection for Heathcliff </li></ul><ul><li>Master of Wuthering Heights following father’s death and becomes the new Mr. Earnshaw ** </li></ul><ul><li>Marries Frances </li></ul>
  37. 43. Heathcliff <ul><li>Gypsy? Orphan </li></ul><ul><li>No last name </li></ul><ul><li>Adoptive brother to Catherine & Hindley </li></ul><ul><li>As an young adult, tries to remake himself to win Catherine’s approval </li></ul><ul><li>Love/hate relationship with Catherine </li></ul>
  38. 44. The Lintons <ul><li>(Old) Mr. Linton </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Father to Edgar & Isabella </li></ul></ul><ul><li>m. (Old) Mrs. Linton </li></ul><ul><ul><li>not to be confused with Catherine who m. Edgar Linton and thus becomes a Mrs. Linton </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Edgar Linton </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Always attracted to Catherine </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Isabella Linton </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Attracted to the remade Heathcliff </li></ul></ul>
  39. 45. Lesser or Later Characters <ul><li>(Old) Mr. Earnshaw m. Mrs. Earnshaw </li></ul><ul><li>Zillah </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Heights Housekeeper when Nelly is away </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Dr. Kenneth </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hindley’s drinking buddy in Gimmerton </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Frances </li></ul><ul><ul><li>m. Hindley </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hareton </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Son of Hindley </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cathy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Daughter of Cathy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Linton Heathcliff?!?! </li></ul>
  40. 46. Map of the Moors The Earnshaws The Lintons
  41. 47. Narrative Structure: Simple… <ul><li>Prologue in present time (chs. 1-3) </li></ul><ul><li>Heathcliff’s childhood in fb (chs. 4-17) </li></ul><ul><li>Heathcliff’s adulthood in fb (chs. 18-31) </li></ul><ul><li>Epilogue in present time (chs. 32-34) </li></ul>
  42. 48. … yet complex
  43. 49. … just the way passion really is.
  44. 50. Function of Framed Narrative Structure <ul><li>No omniscient narrator to explain characters’ feelings, so the language is extremely emotional and engaging </li></ul><ul><li>Involves reader directly inside the story </li></ul><ul><li>Aesthetic balance-- the novel ends at about the same time it begins </li></ul><ul><li>If actions had been explained by an omniscient narrator, it would not have been as democratic, free to reader interpretation </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for free shifts in the time, events, narrators, and realistic dialogue (and dialect) which force the reader to make his or her own meaning </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogue and complicated framed narrative allow the characters to express themselves, appear as real and dynamic personalities and counterbalance the otherwise dubious supernatural aspects </li></ul><ul><li>Limitation: the story is left to speak for itself and impart exposition to the reader without much help </li></ul>http:// images.google.com/imgres?imgurl =http://teoriadelaliteratura.blogia.com/upload/20060329001935-narrativestructure-wh-scheme.jpg&imgrefurl=http://teoriadelaliteratura.blogia.com/2006/032901-narrative-structure-and-techniques-in-wuthering-heights..php&h=384&w=553&sz=25&hl= en&start =18&sig2=tdL-fiBGjHK_ItX33OWjGw&um=1&usg=__MyYOhgeCKUd_OqSJhaRK0SUnrsA=& tbnid =NfX-zsgyBOAG6M:&tbnh=92&tbnw=133&ei=rF_ESPquHZH-1QbGvujzBw&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dnelly%2Bdean%2Bwuthering%2Bheights%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1C1GGLS_en-USUS291%26sa%3DG
  45. 51. Lockwood vs. Nelly: Opposing and Complimentary Perspectives <ul><li>Both fall under personal prejudices and moral judgments </li></ul><ul><li>We realize for ourselves that both are right AND wrong, so our opinion of the characters is personal and unique-- not the same as Lockwood’s or Nelly’s by the novel’s end </li></ul><ul><li>Complimentary perspectives prevent us from making the same mistakes and assumptions that they make </li></ul><ul><li>Brontë is telling us what NOT to do: judge the characters as quickly as we might judge any real person </li></ul><ul><li>Story within story feels like a legend, so these are not only characters but also something greater --or worse-- than we could be in our own lives </li></ul>http:// images.google.com/imgres?imgurl =http://teoriadelaliteratura.blogia.com/upload/20060329001935-narrativestructure-wh-scheme.jpg&imgrefurl=http://teoriadelaliteratura.blogia.com/2006/032901-narrative-structure-and-techniques-in-wuthering-heights..php&h=384&w=553&sz=25&hl= en&start =18&sig2=tdL-fiBGjHK_ItX33OWjGw&um=1&usg=__MyYOhgeCKUd_OqSJhaRK0SUnrsA=& tbnid =NfX-zsgyBOAG6M:&tbnh=92&tbnw=133&ei=rF_ESPquHZH-1QbGvujzBw&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dnelly%2Bdean%2Bwuthering%2Bheights%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1C1GGLS_en-USUS291%26sa%3DG
  46. 52. Wuthering Heights &quot;Wuthering&quot; is a local word from northern England, meaning wild, exposed, storm- blown
  47. 53. Content and Form <ul><li>Wuthering Heights blows aside attempts to define it </li></ul><ul><li>Unrestrained narrative structure enables storytelling to blow freely forward and backward in time </li></ul>
  48. 54. Film Versions of  Wuthering Heights <ul><li>Wuthering Heights . Director: A. V. Bramble. Actors: Milton Rosmer, Colette Brettel, Warwick Ward, and Anne Trevor. British, 1920. Movie. </li></ul><ul><li>Wuthering Heights . Director: William Wyler. Actors: Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon. American, 1939. Movie. A classic and widely regarded as the definitive version. </li></ul><ul><li>Wuthering Heights . Director: Paul Nickell. Actors: Charlton Heston and Richard Waring. American, 1950. Live TV broadcast. </li></ul><ul><li>Abismos de Pasion . Director: Luis Buñuel. Actors: Jorge Mistral and Iraseme Dilian. Mexican, 1954. Movie. </li></ul><ul><li>Wuthering Heights . Director: Peter Sasdy. Actors: Ian McShane and Angela Scoular. British, 1967. TV series.  </li></ul><ul><li>Wuthering Heights . Director: Robert Fuest. Actors: Timothy Dalton and Anna Calder-Marshall. G.B.: American, 1970.Movie. </li></ul><ul><li>Wuthering Heights . Director: Peter Hammond. Actors: Ken Hutchison and Kay Adshead. British, 1978. TV series. </li></ul><ul><li>Hurlevent . Director: Jacques Rivette. Actors: Lucas Belvaux and Fabienne Babe. French, 1985. Movie. </li></ul><ul><li>Arashi ga oka . Director: Yoshishige Yoshida. Actors: Yusaku Matsuda and Yuko Tanaka. Japanese, 1988. Movie. </li></ul><ul><li>Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights . Director: Peter Kosminsky. Actors: Ralph Fiennes and Juliette Binoche. British, 1992. Binoche plays the roles of Catherine and Cathy. Movie. </li></ul><ul><li>Wuthering Heights . Director: David Skynner. Actors: Robert Cavanah and Orla Brady. British and American, 1998.TV movie. </li></ul><ul><li>Wuthering Heights CA . Director: Suri Krishnamma. Actors: Erika Christensen and Mike Vogel. American, 2003. TV movie. </li></ul><ul><li>Wuthering Heights . MTV musical, 2003. </li></ul>

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