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Great Marsh Coastal Resiliency Planning

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As presented at the Great Marsh Coalition Syposium in November 2015

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Great Marsh Coastal Resiliency Planning

  1. 1. Great Marsh Symposium November 12, 2015 Great Marsh Coastal Community Resiliency and Adaptation Planning
  2. 2. Presentation Outline • The science behind climate-driven threats • Defining vulnerability • Overview of the resiliency planning initiative • Work completed to date • What lies ahead • Vulnerability findings for Salisbury, Newbury, Newburyport • Vulnerability findings for Essex, Ipswich, and Rowley
  3. 3. Why Here? Why Now?
  4. 4. Essex Technical High School Report – April 2015 Bigger & More Frequent Storms
  5. 5. Bigger Storms Mean More Precipitation Overview of the Manomet Climate Change Adaptation Project “Over most regions, precipitation is likely to be less frequent but more intense, and precipitation extremes are very likely to increase”
  6. 6. Sea Level Rise Historical & Longer-term Projections NewHampshireCoastalRisks &HazardsCommission
  7. 7. Erosion Climate Change is the Great Accelerator
  8. 8. Vulnerability = sensitivity + exposure + adaptive capacity A resource is vulnerable if it is exposed and sensitive to the effects of climate change and at the same time has only limited capacity to adapt.
  9. 9. Dept. of Interior Hurricane Sandy Resiliency Grants Program “Community Risk Reduction through Comprehensive Community Resiliency Enhancement for the Great Marsh Ecosystem” Project Area: • Salisbury, Newbury, Newburyport, Essex, Ipswich, & Rowley. Resiliency Planning Objectives: • Assess overall community vulnerability as well provide focused assessments of highly vulnerable high-priority community assets through a comprehensive and integrated approach. • Identify operationally feasible, site-specific adaptation strategies that serve to reduce risk. • Engage communities as we work together to lay a framework for future implementation of on-the-ground adaptation strategies.
  10. 10. 1. Develop community climate vulnerability assessments 2. Conduct comprehensive public outreach & engagement 3. Publish an Adaptation Plan & Implementation Roadmap Community Resiliency Planning Tasks To Be Completed
  11. 11. Project components • Community Engagement & Planning • Hazard Vulnerability and Socio-economic Impact Assessment • Marsh Adaptation Strategy Tool (MAST) • Coastal Adaptation to Sea Level Rise Tool (COAST)
  12. 12. Year 1 • Community task force implementation • Identify community assets & concerns • Publish community climate- vulnerability assessments • Community Vulnerability Workshops Year 2 • Identify adaptation strategies • Hold community adaptation workshop • Write community coastal adaptation plans • Hold regional implementation workshops Where are we? 6 months into the process
  13. 13. Phase 1: Assess Community Vulnerability Identified resources of concern by… • Collecting existing data • Conducting new analyses
  14. 14. Community Vulnerability Documents Work to Date • Review of community exposure, sensitivity, and vulnerability. • In depth look at high-priority assets in the community • First drafts written for Salisbury, Newbury, Newburyport, Essex, Ipswich, & Rowley
  15. 15. Work Ahead • Finalize Vulnerability Assessments • Continue community outreach • Develop Adaptation Strategies • Host public workshops • Publish Great Marsh Climate Adaptation Plan & Implementation Roadmap
  16. 16. Community Resiliency Task Force Northern Region (Salisbury-Newburyport-Newbury) Great Marsh Coastal Community Resiliency and Adaptation Planning
  17. 17. Community Resiliency Planning • Members were appointed to Community Task Forces in April 2015 • Task Forces convened in May & have met three times in regional groups • Work has continued over past six months in person and off-line • Committee work • Sub-projects (MAST & COAST) • Monthly conference calls
  18. 18. Identifying Current Vulnerabilities: Hazard Mitigation & other plans • MVPC regional plan includes Rowley, Newbury, Newburyport & Salisbury • Summarizes specific hazards and “targets” that are vulnerable • FEMA Flood Risk report Essex County, MA – 2013 • Master plans • Open space plans • Natural Heritage Biomap reports
  19. 19. Task forces reviewed and prioritized community assets of highest concern Prioritization of community resources
  20. 20. Salisbury • Northernmost coastal community in MA • 15.4 sq. miles land area, 27% of which is Great Marsh • 8,283 year-round residents, grows to as many as 24,000 in summer • majority of the town’s infrastructure is located in two sections: Salisbury Beach and Salisbury Square • Salisbury Beach is a 3.8-mile barrier beach • Salisbury Square is 2 miles inland and is town center with municipal buildings, stores & residences
  21. 21. High-Priority Assets Identified By The Salisbury Resiliency Task Force High-Priority Assets Identified By The Salisbury Resiliency Task Force Priority Asset Location Hazard Type Salisbury Barrier Beach 3.8 mile long beach from NH Border to Merrimack River Jetty Erosion, flooding Salisbury Beach at Broadway East of Broadway, stretching 200ft north and south Erosion, flooding Coastal Dune South of Broadway Ocean Street to Vermont Street Erosion, flooding Coastal Dune #2 @ Salisbury Beach Northeast of Ocean Street Erosion, flooding Low-lying residential areas bordering the Blackwater River salt marsh 9th Street south to Lewis Ave Flooding North End Boulevard from Old Town Way to 18th street Flooding Sewage Pumping Station 228 Beach Rd Flooding Coastal Dune #1 @ Salisbury Beach East of Driftway Rd Erosion, flooding Seawall @ First Street 32 1st Street Erosion, flooding
  22. 22. Salisbury Beach at Broadway St. Coastal dunes
  23. 23. Newburyport • Bordered by Merrimack River to north, Newbury to south • Includes northern tip of Plum Island • 17,800 year-round residents • historic downtown • waterfront district is the civic and commercial center of the city • Industrial Park along border with Newbury is home to approx. 60 industrial businesses
  24. 24. High-Priority Assets Identified By The Newburyport Resiliency Task Force High-Priority Assets Identified By The Newburyport Resiliency Task Force Priority Asset Location/Coordinates Hazard Type Plum Island Turnpike Joppa Flats Nature Center East to Sunset Dr. Tidal and storm flooding Waste Water Treatment Facility 157 Water Street Flooding from storm surge and SLR Lower Artichoke Reservoir West end of Newburyport south of Merrimack River Salt-water intrusion Bartlett Spring Pond 742 Spring Ln Salt-water intrusion Merrimack River Jetty System Mouth of the Merrimack River Deteriorates over time; potentially increases erosion Scotland Rd at Little River/Parker Street Flooding Water Street Plum Island Turnpike to Merrimack Street Flooding Central Waterfront Cashman Park to US Coast Guard Station Flooding Revetment at Cashman Park Cashman Park Degrading over time Revetment at Harbor Master Building Cashman Park Degrading over time
  25. 25. Waste Water Treatment Facility Central Waterfront & Downtown businesses
  26. 26. COAST: Coastal Adaptation to Sea Level Rise Tool One-time Damages from 100-year Flood in Newburyport, MA Study Area Year Sea Level Rise Damage to Buildings 2030 Low (0.31 ft) $14.1 Million 2030 Med (0.50 ft) $14.9 Million 2030 High (0.72 ft) $15.8 Million 2070 Low (1.09 ft) $18.3 Million 2070 Med (2.19 ft) $24.2 Million 2070 High (3.45 ft) $32.4 Million
  27. 27. Newbury • 24.2 square miles, 30% of land area is Great Marsh • 6,666 year-round residents, swells in summer due to Plum Island’s seasonal homes, many located along coast of island • Town’s infrastructure is located in three distinct sections: Old Town, Byfield, and Plum Island • Parker River & Little River & low-lying topography contribute to tidal & inland flooding
  28. 28. High-Priority Assets Identified By The Newbury Resiliency Task Force High-Priority Assets Identified By The Newbury Resiliency Task Force Priority Asset Location/Coordinates Hazard Type Plum Island Turnpike/Plumbush Downs MA Audubon’s Joppa Flats Education Center East to Sunset Dr. Tidal and storm flooding Sewage Pumping Station on Plum Island Webbers Ct. & Olga Way Near area subject to overtopping Newbury Elementary School 63 Hanover St. Emergency shelter – access points flood. Newburyport Turnpike/Rt. 1 Rt.1 at Parker River bridge Tidal and storm flooding Newburyport Industrial Park Parker St, Scotland Rd Flooding caused by small culverts Triton Middle & High School - Elm St/Central St - 112 Elm St, Byfield, MA 01922 Possible future flooding of ball fields Newburyport train station Route 1 rotary near Little River & back end of Parker St Flooding Pine Island Road off of 1A Flooding, ice cakes, high winds, zero visibility Cottage Road off of 1A near Parker River Flooding from Parker River Central St. dam 70 Central St Flooding, possible dam failure River St./Forest St. dam Byfield Flooding, possible dam failure Groin/Jetty @ Plum Island Boulevard Plum Island Deteriorates over time, possible erosion
  29. 29. Plum Island Turnpike/ Plumbush Downs Industrial Park & Little River area
  30. 30. • The Salisbury and Plum Island Barrier Beaches are the #1 line of defense for our communities • Unfortunately, developed barrier beaches are much less resilient to impacts of climate change. Regional resources of collective concern to the northern task force
  31. 31. Community Resiliency Task Force Southern Region (Essex-Ipswich-Rowley) Great Marsh Coastal Community Resiliency and Adaptation Planning
  32. 32. Identifying Current Vulnerabilities: Hazard Mitigation Plans • Ipswich & Essex Hazard Mitigation Plans with MAPC • MVPC regional plan includes Rowley, Newbury, Newburyport & Salisbury • Summarizes specific hazards and “targets” that are vulnerable
  33. 33. Community Resiliency Planning • Members were appointed to Community Task Forces in April 2015 • Task Forces convened in May & have met three times in regional groups • Work has continued over past six months in person and off-line • Committee work • Monthly conference calls
  34. 34. Task forces reviewed and prioritized community assets of highest concern Prioritization of community resources
  35. 35. Essex • 16 sq. miles of which 48% is forested and 34% is Great Marsh • 3504 residents • Majority of infrastructure located along Rt 133/ Main St Causeway spanning salt marsh and Essex River • Causeway is a critical transportation corridor
  36. 36. High-Priority Assets Identified By The Essex Resiliency Task Force High-Priority Assets Identified By The Essex Resiliency Task Force Priority Asset Location Hazard Type Main Street Causeway & Woodman's Beach 74 Main St. to 166 Main St. Flooding Eastern Avenue at Ebben Creek 81 Eastern Ave to 97 Eastern Ave Flooding Conomo Point Rd All of Conomo Point Rd Flooding Crane Beach (tip of point) Erosion Farnham’s Restaurant culvert 88 Eastern Ave Flooding Eastern Ave and Grove St Intersection of Eastern Ave and Grove St Richdale’s Gas Station 156 Main Street Flooding Ball fields (high school baseball) and playground behind Town Hall Flooding Landing Road culvert Alewife Brook crossing off of Western Ave Flooding Apple Street culvert near Andrews Street Flooding
  37. 37. Main Street Causeway & Woodman's Beach Conomo Point Road
  38. 38. Ipswich • 33 sq. miles, 21% of land area is Great Marsh • 13,175 residents • Dense downtown along the banks of Ipswich River house most of town infrastructure • Crane Beach is important community resource for recreation and tourism
  39. 39. High-Priority Assets Identified By The Ipswich Resiliency Task Force High-Priority Assets Identified By The Ipswich Resiliency Task Force Priority Asset Location/Coordinates Hazard Type Jeffrey’s Neck Road Beachview Lane northeast to 144 Jeffrey's Neck Rd Flooding Downtown Ipswich Main St businesses and County Rd near Choate Bridge Flooding Crane Beach End of Argilla Road Erosion Route 1A at Muddy Run 188 High Street Flooding South Main Street 45 S Main Street Flooding Town Wharf + pumping station 68 East St Flooding Labor in Vain Road Bridge 80 Labor In vain Road Flooding Fox Creek Bridge 200 Argilla Road Flooding Choate Bridge Downtown Flooding
  40. 40. Crane Beach Town Wharf & Sewage Pumping Station
  41. 41. Rowley • Rural coastal community of 5856 residents, located between Newbury and Ipswich • 19 sq. miles in size, of which 20% is Great Marsh • 90% of town is zoned for residential use; business development along Route 1 & Route 1A corridors
  42. 42. High-Priority Assets Identified By The Rowley Resiliency Task Force High-Priority Assets Identified By The Rowley Resiliency Task Force Priority Asset Location Hazard Type Route 133 at Bachelder Brook North of Route 1 intersection Flooding Jewell Mill Dam Off Route 1 near Newbury town line Dam failure/flooding Rowley Town Well # 3 Along Mill River off of Boxford Road Flooding, inundation of well pump station 13 acres of beach on Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Plum Island Erosion Hillside St culvert at tributary to Mill River Flooding Newbury Road South of Route 133 Flooding Stackyard Road East of Route 1A at north end of town Flooding Communications Cell Tower 594 Main Street Flooding
  43. 43. Jewel Mill Dam at Mill River Route 133 at Batchelder Brook culvert
  44. 44. Barrier beaches that are undeveloped but are seeing changes due to climate impacts Regional resources of collective concern to the southern task force Plum Island Crane Beach Rowley Ipswich Essex
  45. 45. Thank You! Great Marsh Resiliency Partnership
  46. 46. Community Vulnerability Assessment Introduction to Table Discussions • Each table will have: • List of assets • Maps to review • Facilitator • Note taker • Questions to spark discussion
  47. 47. Community Vulnerability Documents Questions for Table Discussions General • What climate-driven threats are you most concerned about ? • What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you think of climate threats? • What’s the best way to disseminate vulnerability information in your community? • How can we get our towns and general public to think more long term? Specific • Are there additional vulnerable assets that we missed? • Of the high-priority assets we’ve identified, which assets are the most critical? • Looking 20 years into the future, how do you envision your community changing and how will those changes exacerbate or mitigate climate-driven threats?
  48. 48. Thank You! Great Marsh Resiliency Partnership

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