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Essex climatechangeflooding_ScottHursley

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From 2013 Great Marsh Coalition

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Essex climatechangeflooding_ScottHursley

  1. 1. Adapting to Climate Change with Low Impact Development (LID): Scott Horsley Horsley Witten Group, Inc. Sandwich Boston Providence Newburyport
  2. 2. Image  Credit:  New  England  Integrated  Sciences  and  Assessment,  h8p://inhale.unh.edu/Climate/ index.html  
  3. 3. Image  credit:  U.S.  Global  Change  Research  Program  (www.globalchange.gov).  
  4. 4. Future  Design  Storms?   •  Kirshen  et  al.  (2008)  project  sea-­‐level  rise  onto  Pme-­‐series  of   past  surge  events  in  the  U.S.  Northeast  to  esPmate  that  the   2005  100-­‐year-­‐event  will  become  the  30-­‐70  year  event  by   2050.   •  By  2050,  Boston  could  experience  the  current  100-­‐year   riverine  flood  every  two  to  three  years  on  average  and,  by   2100,  the  current  100-­‐year  riverine  flood  is  expected  to  occur   every  one  to  two  years  under  both  the  low-­‐  and  high-­‐ emissions  scenarios  (MA  Climate  Change  AdaptaPon  Report)  
  5. 5. 100-­‐Year  Design  Storms  (inches)   Springfield   Worcester   Boston   TP40  Design  Storm   (1930  –  1960)     6.5   6.5   6.6   Cornell  Design  Storm   (1936  -­‐  2008)     8.8   8.8   8.8     Hydrology  Handbook  for  Conserva2on  Commissions:    Appendix  F.  Rainfall  Data  for   MassachuseBs  from  Rainfall  Frequency  Atlas  of  the  United  States  (TP-­‐40).    Users  of   this  Handbook  should  note  that  current  MA  DEP  wriFen  guidance  (see  DEP   Waterlines  newsleFer  -­‐-­‐  Fall  2000)  requires  the  use  of  TP-­‐40  Rainfall  Data  for   calculaJons  under  the  Wetlands  ProtecJon  RegulaJons  and  the  Stormwater   Management  Policy.  More  stringent  design  storms  may  be  used  under  a  local  bylaw   or  ordinance.      
  6. 6. 100-­‐Year  Design  Storms  (inches)   Springfield   Worcester   Boston   TP40  Design  Storm   (1930  –  1960)     6.5   6.5   6.6   Cornell  Design  Storm   (1936  -­‐  2008)     8.8   8.8   8.8     Hydrology  Handbook  for  Conserva2on  Commissions:    Appendix  F.  Rainfall  Data  for   MassachuseBs  from  Rainfall  Frequency  Atlas  of  the  United  States  (TP-­‐40).    Users  of   this  Handbook  should  note  that  current  MA  DEP  wriFen  guidance  (see  DEP   Waterlines  newsleFer  -­‐-­‐  Fall  2000)  requires  the  use  of  TP-­‐40  Rainfall  Data  for   calculaJons  under  the  Wetlands  ProtecJon  RegulaJons  and  the  Stormwater   Management  Policy.  More  stringent  design  storms  may  be  used  under  a  local  bylaw   or  ordinance.      
  7. 7. Future  Design  Storms  with  ConPnued  Climate  Change   Source:    University  of  New  Hampshire  
  8. 8. No  building  present  on  lot,  2005  photo  
  9. 9. FEMA  100-­‐year  flood,   depth  >  1  foot,  at  2me   building  constructed   FEMA  100-­‐year  flood,  depth  <  1  foot,   at  2me  building  constructed   Building  constructed  between  2005  and  2008,  in   loca2on  not  designated  as  FEMA  floodplain  
  10. 10. Prior  100-­‐year  flood,   depth  >  1  foot   100-­‐year  flood,  depth  >1  foot,  from  2010  FEMA  study   Building  constructed  between  2005  and   2008,  now  in  regulated  floodplain  aQer  2010   FEMA  re-­‐study  
  11. 11. Same  building,  March  2010  flood   (approximately  40-­‐year  flood)  
  12. 12. Key  Stormwater  RegulaPons    Federal  Clean  Water  Act,  NaPonal  Pollutant  Discharge   EliminaPon  System  (NPDES):   •  EPA  2003  MS4  Permits     •  EPA  General  Stormwater  Permit  (MA)    (expected  2013??)          
  13. 13. Key  Stormwater  RegulaPons    Federal  Clean  Water  Act,  NaPonal  Pollutant  Discharge   EliminaPon  System  (NPDES):   •  EPA  2003  MS4  Permits     •  EPA  General  Stormwater  Permit  (MA)    (expected  2013??)     Massachuse8s  IniPaPves:   •  MA  Stormwater  Standards  (jurisdicPon  under  Wetlands   ProtecPon  RegulaPons)   •  MA  Water  Management  Act  (Sustainable  Water   Management  IniPaPve,  SWMI)   •  MA  Climate  Change  AdaptaPon  Report/Regulatory  Changes      
  14. 14. Key  Stormwater  RegulaPons    Federal  Clean  Water  Act,  NaPonal  Pollutant  Discharge  EliminaPon   System  (NPDES):   •  EPA  2003  MS4  Permits     •  EPA  General  Stormwater  Permit  (MA)    (expected  2013??)     Massachuse8s  IniPaPves:   •  MA  Stormwater  Standards  (jurisdicPon  under  Wetlands  ProtecPon   RegulaPons)   •  MA  Water  Management  Act  (Sustainable  Water  Management   IniPaPve,  SWMI)   •  MA  Climate  Change  AdaptaPon  Report/Regulatory  Changes     Local  Ordinance/Bylaw/RegulaPons  (required  MS4)      
  15. 15. LID  Stormwater  Management  Techniques   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  Rain  Barrels  and  Cisterns  /  Water  Re-­‐use   Stormwater  Planters,  Tree  PlanPng   Permeable  Paving   Open  Channels   BioretenPon   Stormwater  Wetlands   Green  Roogop  Systems   VegetaPve  Buffers   InfiltraPon  
  16. 16. Permeable  Pavement  
  17. 17. Rain  Barrels  and  Cisterns   Runoff  ReducPon  &  Water  ConservaPon   •  Downspouts  directed  to   tanks  or  barrels   •  50  –10,000  gallons   •  Excess  diverted  to   drywell  or  rain  garden   •  Landscaping,  car   washing,  other  non-­‐ potable  uses  
  18. 18. Dry  Well  Infiltra2on  of   Roof  Runoff   Source:  CWP   DisconnecPon  of  Roogop   Runoff  to  Vegetated  Swale   Source:  Horsley  Wi8en  Group  
  19. 19. Permeable  Pavement  
  20. 20. Vegetated  Swales   Conveyance,  Treatment,  Infiltra2on   •  Roadside  swales  (“country   drainage”)  for  lower  density   and  small-­‐scale  projects   •  For  small  parking  lots   •  Mild  side  slopes  and  flat   longitudinal  slopes   •  Provides  area  for  snow   storage  &  snowmelt   treatment  
  21. 21. BioretenPon  ApplicaPons   •  •  •  •  Parking  lot  islands   Median  strips   ResidenPal  lots   Office  parks   Source: Larry Gavin Source: LID Center
  22. 22. BioretenPon  Cell   Water  Street,  Plymouth  Center,  MA  
  23. 23. NYC  GI  Design  Criteria  
  24. 24. New  York  City  –  Bioreten2on  Retrofit  
  25. 25. Rain  Garden    
  26. 26. Green  Roofs   •  Stormwater  Runoff   absorpPon/collecPon   •  Reduced  flooding  of  and   damage  to  urban  streets   •  Interior  heaPng  and   cooling  benefits  of  10   degrees  or  more   •  Air  purificaPon   •  RecreaPonal  amenity   •  Improved  aesthePcs   World  Trade  Center,  Boston   •  Extended  roof  life,   esPmated  at  40  years  
  27. 27. Stormwater  Planters   •  VegetaPve  uptake  of   stormwater  pollutants   •  Pretreatment  for   suspended  solids   before  they  reach  water-­‐ treatment  faciliPes   •  AesthePcally  pleasing   •  ReducPon  of  peak   discharge  rate  
  28. 28. Dry  Well  Infiltra2on  of   Roof  Runoff   Source:  CWP   DisconnecPon  of  Roogop   Runoff  to  Vegetated  Swale   Source:  Horsley  Wi8en  Group  
  29. 29. Natural Conservation Area Lawn  IrrigaPon   50-­‐100  gals/day   Roogop/Driveway  Runoff    36-­‐94   gals/day   Dry   Well   InfiltraPon   Swale   Open  SecPon  Road  
  30. 30. Horsley Witten
  31. 31. LID  Principles  at  The  Pinehills   •  •  •  •  •  •  Cluster  Development   Reduce  Impervious  Areas   AlternaPve  Landscaping   Stormwater  Management   Wastewater  Re-­‐use   Nutrient  Management  
  32. 32. Preserved Historic Sandwich Road
  33. 33. Horsley Witten
  34. 34. Stormwater  Management  
  35. 35. Integrated  Water  Management  
  36. 36. Water Table Map With Groundwater Flow Arrows Horsley Witten
  37. 37. Zone II
  38. 38. WWTP Zone II
  39. 39. Interceptor/Irrigation Wells WWTP Zone II
  40. 40. Water to Cafe Irrigation & Water Fountain MWRA Water Floor Washing Storage Tank Overflow to Sewer Groundwater Pumping
  41. 41. THANK  YOU!                      QUESTIONS?          

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