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Mark Twain’s Home
Hartford, CT
1874-1891
c.1884. left to right: Clara, Olivia,
Jean, Sam, Susy & Hash (dog)
c.1884. left t...
Between 1871-
1873
Twain leased the
Hookers’ house
while building his
own Hartford
home.
On January 21, 1868
Mark Twain fi...
Welcome to
Nook Farm,
Twain’s Hartford
house in the 1800’s.
Nook Farm
The Hooker House
The Harriet Beecher Stowe House
“Its spacious Victorian homes stood amid carefully
landscaped g...
Charles Dudley Warner House
Francis Gillette House
“The houses appeared to be
irregularly spaced on one enormous
fenceless...
The Twain House
on the
Park River,
Nook Farm
Photo of Hartford home, 1800s fromDave Thomson collection
Explore
the
house...
19 rooms & 5 baths
19 rooms & 5 baths
http://www.marktwainhouse.org/house/floor_plans.php
As you explored the house, what themes were present?
The First Floor........Guests/Entertaining
The Second Floor....Family...
In the book Papa, Susy Clemens describes her
father’s story telling. Twain comments:
and into that romance I had to get al...
Notice the objects on the
mantle? Write your own
story using the objects
Twain describes and the
objects you see. Click fo...
As you tour Twain’s house,
make a list of descriptive
phrases about the exterior
and each room.
Later, you will use these ...
Text
Read
The Hartford Daily
Times 1874
description of the
house.
Read another
description of
the house from
the Elmira
Advertiser, 1874
Read this
description from
Living Leaders of
the World, 1878
Twain’s description in a letter to his wife
Olivia Clemens, dated July 3, 1874
“You may look at the house or the grounds f...
Why did he leave?
Initially, the family left
to live in Europe to
save money.
Later, the family does
not return because of...
Nook Farm: Mark Twain’s Hartford Circle
by Kenneth R. Andrews
1950
“His exaggerated grief over Susie’s death convinced him...
Samuel Colt Mansion
James L. Goodwin
Mansion
Hartford’s Elite
Resources:
Clemens, Susy. Papa. Doubleday & Co, Inc., NY, 1985
Faude, Wilson H., Mark Twain’s House:Handbook for Restorati...
Mark Twain House, Nook Farm houses, Colt mansion, Hartford, CT
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Mark Twain House, Nook Farm houses, Colt mansion, Hartford, CT

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Explore the Mark Twain house and other of Hartford's celebrities of the 1800's.

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Mark Twain House, Nook Farm houses, Colt mansion, Hartford, CT

  1. 1. Mark Twain’s Home Hartford, CT 1874-1891 c.1884. left to right: Clara, Olivia, Jean, Sam, Susy & Hash (dog) c.1884. left to right: Clara, Olivia, Jean, Sam, Susy & Hash (dog)
  2. 2. Between 1871- 1873 Twain leased the Hookers’ house while building his own Hartford home. On January 21, 1868 Mark Twain first visited Hartford. 1864 City View of Hartford By John Bachmann
  3. 3. Welcome to Nook Farm, Twain’s Hartford house in the 1800’s.
  4. 4. Nook Farm The Hooker House The Harriet Beecher Stowe House “Its spacious Victorian homes stood amid carefully landscaped grounds that emerged imperceptibly into each other to create the effect of an extensive park.” p. 7 Nook Farm, Van Why
  5. 5. Charles Dudley Warner House Francis Gillette House “The houses appeared to be irregularly spaced on one enormous fenceless estate. Winding among the trees were paths and shortcuts which neighbors used without going to the street. Doors were always unlocked and residents of the Farm walked in and out of each other’s houses at any time of day without knocking.” p. 84 Nook Farm: Mark Twain’s Hartford Circle Nook Farm
  6. 6. The Twain House on the Park River, Nook Farm Photo of Hartford home, 1800s fromDave Thomson collection
  7. 7. Explore the house... 19 rooms & 5 baths 19 rooms & 5 baths http://www.marktwainhouse.org/house/floor_plans.php
  8. 8. As you explored the house, what themes were present? The First Floor........Guests/Entertaining The Second Floor....Family The Third Floor.....Sam's interests
  9. 9. In the book Papa, Susy Clemens describes her father’s story telling. Twain comments: and into that romance I had to get all that bric-a-brac and the three pictures. I had to start always with the cat and finish with Emmeline. I was never allowed the refreshment of a change, end for end. It was not permiss-
  10. 10. Notice the objects on the mantle? Write your own story using the objects Twain describes and the objects you see. Click for rubric.
  11. 11. As you tour Twain’s house, make a list of descriptive phrases about the exterior and each room. Later, you will use these to write a descriptive narrative about Twain’s house to your local paper. Click for rubric. Click for rubric. Click for rubric. Explore descriptions
  12. 12. Text Read The Hartford Daily Times 1874 description of the house.
  13. 13. Read another description of the house from the Elmira Advertiser, 1874
  14. 14. Read this description from Living Leaders of the World, 1878
  15. 15. Twain’s description in a letter to his wife Olivia Clemens, dated July 3, 1874 “You may look at the house or the grounds from any point of view you choose, & they are simple exquisite. It is a quite, murmurous, enchanting poem, done in the solid elements of nature. The house & barn do not seem to have been set up on the grassy slopes & levels by laws & plans & specifications--it seems as if they grew up out of the ground& were part & parcel of Nature’s handiwork. The harmony of size, shape, color--everything--is harmonious. It is a home and the word never had so much meaning before...”
  16. 16. Why did he leave? Initially, the family left to live in Europe to save money. Later, the family does not return because of Susie’s death.
  17. 17. Nook Farm: Mark Twain’s Hartford Circle by Kenneth R. Andrews 1950 “His exaggerated grief over Susie’s death convinced him that his misery would be deepened if he were to live again in Nook Farm where life once, in bitter contrast, had been full and pleasant...Until his death he returned frequently for brief visits and looked upon his surviving cronies, all of whom he remembered with more than ordinary pleasure and mourned when they died.” pg. 233 “His exaggerated grief over Susie’s death convinced him that his misery would be deepened if he were to live again in Nook Farm where life once, in bitter contrast, had been full and pleasant...Until his death he returned frequently for brief visits and looked upon his surviving cronies, all of whom he remembered with more than ordinary pleasure and mourned when they died.” pg. 233 “His exaggerated grief over Susie’s death convinced him that his misery would be deepened if he were to live again in Nook Farm where life once, in bitter contrast, had been full and pleasant...Until his death he returned frequently for brief visits and looked upon his surviving cronies, all of whom he remembered with more than ordinary pleasure and mourned when they died.” pg. 233 “His exaggerated grief over Susie’s death convinced him that his misery would be deepened if he were to live again in Nook Farm where life once, in bitter contrast, had been full and pleasant...Until his death he returned frequently for brief visits and looked upon his surviving cronies, all of whom he remembered with more than ordinary pleasure and mourned when they died.” pg. 233
  18. 18. Samuel Colt Mansion James L. Goodwin Mansion Hartford’s Elite
  19. 19. Resources: Clemens, Susy. Papa. Doubleday & Co, Inc., NY, 1985 Faude, Wilson H., Mark Twain’s House:Handbook for Restoration. Queens House, NY, 1978 Andrews, Kenneth R., Nook Farm:Mark Twain’s Hartford Circle. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass, 1950 “Mark Twain’s House”, The Hartford Daily Times. March 23, 1874 Wallace & Parton, Living Leaders of the World. 1878 “Mark Twain’s House”, Elmira Advertiser. January 30, 1874 (reprinting the Titusville Herald, PA) Clemens, Samuel, Letter to Olivia L. Clemens. July 3, 1874 (The Mark Twain House Collection) All photos courtesy of The Mark Twain House Collection. For classroom use only. Special thanks to Patricia Philippon, Chief Curator, The Mark Twain House, Hartford, CT

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