‘Living fossil’ vertebrates andrates of morphological evolution         Graeme T. Lloyd
Background
Conference on Genetics, Paleontology and             Evolution held at Princeton, January 1947                            ...
George Gaylord Simpson                           • T&M published 1944                           • Confirmed that rates    ...
Thomas Stanley Westoll                           • Devised a method to                             investigate tempo in   ...
Background             (Westoll 1949)
Problems with Westoll’s                          methodology:              • Ancestor artificial (Schopf 1984)            ...
Previous Solutions              • Derstler 1982 and Forey 1988              • Used cladistic (character-taxon) matrices   ...
The Problem With Rates I              • Rate of change = Δx / Δt              • Δt often zero between nodes (rate = ∞)    ...
The Problem With Rates II              • Rates also suffer from the problem of                comparability              S...
Revisiting Lungfish Evolution              • Compiled ‘supermatrix’ from six published                matrices            ...
Results
“it appears possible that the pattern of scores               follows directly from the method of analysis”               ...
Schopf 2: Number of characters and states is a                      function of number of taxaArtefact?
Schopf 2: Number of characters and states is a                      function of number of taxa                            ...
Schopf 2: Number of characters and states is a                      function of number of taxaArtefact?
“it appears possible that the pattern of scores               follows directly from the method of analysis”               ...
Paedomorphosis as an explanation                 for the lungfish pattern            • Paedomorphosis can be obligate and ...
Lungfish Pattern as a Biological                                PhenomenaBiologically Real?                     • Westoll/...
“The lungfish [adaptive] zone would seem to be quite narrow and                       yet it has persisted without marked ...
Lungfish Pattern as a Biological                                PhenomenaBiologically Real?                     • Westoll/...
ActinistiansOther Groups                (Cloutier 1991)
RhynchocephaliansOther Groups                   (Lloyd in prep.)
AmiidsOther Groups               (Grande and Bemis 1998)
EquidsOther Groups               (Alroy 1995)
CrocodiliansOther Groups               (Gatesy et al. 2004)
Other Groups   Maniraptorans               (Makovicky et al. 2005)
ArtiodactylsOther Groups               (Gentry and Hooker 1988)
ReptilesOther Groups               (Rieppel and deBraga 1996)
Conclusions              • A simple modification of Westoll’s                methodology for use with cladistic           ...
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'Living fossil' vertebrates and rates of morphological evolution

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'Living fossil' vertebrates and rates of morphological evolution

  1. 1. ‘Living fossil’ vertebrates andrates of morphological evolution Graeme T. Lloyd
  2. 2. Background
  3. 3. Conference on Genetics, Paleontology and Evolution held at Princeton, January 1947 Thomas Stanley WestollBackground George Gaylord Simpson
  4. 4. George Gaylord Simpson • T&M published 1944 • Confirmed that rates vary • Three basic tempos:Background – Tachytely (fast) – Horotely (‘normal’) – Bradytely (slow, living fossils) 1902 – 1984 • Only looked at single characters
  5. 5. Thomas Stanley Westoll • Devised a method to investigate tempo in multiple characters • Constructed character- taxon matrix and addedBackground states (‘scoring’ taxa) • 14 dipnoan genera and 26 ordered multi-state characters • Plotted scores vs. time 1912 – 1995
  6. 6. Background (Westoll 1949)
  7. 7. Problems with Westoll’s methodology: • Ancestor artificial (Schopf 1984) • Only well known taxa can be included (Knoll et al. 1984)Methodology • Error bars required (constrain interpretation) • Reversals ignored (Derstler 1982) • Assumes stratigraphically ordered ancestor-descendant sequence
  8. 8. Previous Solutions • Derstler 1982 and Forey 1988 • Used cladistic (character-taxon) matrices • Scored internal nodes of phylogeny (whichMethodology are complete) • Scored as number of character changes between nodes (i.e. include reversals) But: • These authors were calculating rates
  9. 9. The Problem With Rates I • Rate of change = Δx / Δt • Δt often zero between nodes (rate = ∞) • Solution: add arbitrary value to ΔtMethodology – Derstler 1982 Δt + 1Ma – Cloutier 1991 Δt + 2Ma – Forey 1988 Δt + 5Ma • Problem: predicts earlier origin of clade, e.g. Forey value necessitates pre- Cambrian lungfish
  10. 10. The Problem With Rates II • Rates also suffer from the problem of comparability Solution:Methodology • Use the desirable properties of scoring internal nodes, incorporating reversals and a phylogenetic context, but… • …retain Westoll’s plotting method • Reduces assumptions (e.g. anagenesis/cladogenesis)
  11. 11. Revisiting Lungfish Evolution • Compiled ‘supermatrix’ from six published matrices • 85 dipnoan taxa, 2 outgroups and 132Methodology characters • 4118 MPTs • Tree with best-fit to stratigraphy used (worst-fit very similar)
  12. 12. Results
  13. 13. “it appears possible that the pattern of scores follows directly from the method of analysis” (Schopf 1984) 1. Artificial ancestor 2. Number of characters and states recognised a function of number of taxa (most of which are Devonian)Artefact?
  14. 14. Schopf 2: Number of characters and states is a function of number of taxaArtefact?
  15. 15. Schopf 2: Number of characters and states is a function of number of taxa r2 = 0.98853131Artefact?
  16. 16. Schopf 2: Number of characters and states is a function of number of taxaArtefact?
  17. 17. “it appears possible that the pattern of scores follows directly from the method of analysis” (Schopf 1984) 1. Artificial ancestor 2. Number of characters and states recognised a function of number of taxa (most of which are Devonian) 3. If changes were late we would recognise a new group instead (e.g. birds from reptiles)Artefact? 4. A paedomorphic trend (Bemis 1984) in lungfish would limit the number of available character states as time progressed
  18. 18. Paedomorphosis as an explanation for the lungfish pattern • Paedomorphosis can be obligate and irreversible (Bonett & Chippindale 2006) • Bemis’ (1984) hypothesis for a paedomorphic trend in lungfish can be tested as 5 of his 7 characters appear here • However, all 5 have low CI’s (0.2-0.4) and mostArtefact? include reversals (under DELTRAN) • Peramorphic trends also known in lungfish (Long 1993)
  19. 19. Lungfish Pattern as a Biological PhenomenaBiologically Real? • Westoll/Simpson saw it as ‘quantum evolution’
  20. 20. “The lungfish [adaptive] zone would seem to be quite narrow and yet it has persisted without marked change…for perhaps 200 million years” (Simpson 1953)Biologically Real?
  21. 21. Lungfish Pattern as a Biological PhenomenaBiologically Real? • Westoll/Simpson saw it as ‘quantum evolution’ • Others argue for specialisation (aestivation/air-breathing)
  22. 22. ActinistiansOther Groups (Cloutier 1991)
  23. 23. RhynchocephaliansOther Groups (Lloyd in prep.)
  24. 24. AmiidsOther Groups (Grande and Bemis 1998)
  25. 25. EquidsOther Groups (Alroy 1995)
  26. 26. CrocodiliansOther Groups (Gatesy et al. 2004)
  27. 27. Other Groups Maniraptorans (Makovicky et al. 2005)
  28. 28. ArtiodactylsOther Groups (Gentry and Hooker 1988)
  29. 29. ReptilesOther Groups (Rieppel and deBraga 1996)
  30. 30. Conclusions • A simple modification of Westoll’s methodology for use with cladistic matrices is presented • Application of this method to a lungfishConclusions ‘supermatrix’ confirms a pattern of arrested evolutionary tempo • However, this pattern may be a more general feature of evolution

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