Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Plagiarism, copyright and fair use

1,295 views

Published on

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Plagiarism, copyright and fair use

  1. 1. Seminar for Project FREE-Paglaum Educational Research classes Dec. 20, 2014 MM Auditorium A, University of St. La Salle , Bacolod City, Philippines
  2. 2.  Information, to be useful, requires reliability: scientific accuracy, validity and authenticity /verifiability  Created information is intellectual property.  Those who engage in it, rely on it, process it and use it in further disseminating it must observe the highest ethical behavior in protecting its reliability.
  3. 3.  a moral/ethical issue  “1. The appropriation or imitation of another's ideas and manner of expressing them, as in art, literature, etc., 2. To be passed off as one's own; something appropriated and passed off as one's own in this manner.” (RMIT University, 2009)  Includes:  failure to properly document a source  copying material from the internet or databases  collusion between students  purchasing pre-written or on-demand papers from the numerous paper mills and cheat sites
  4. 4.  a legal issue  generally, as soon as a work is created in its final form it is copyrighted  “The exclusive right to produce or reproduce (copy), to perform in public or to publish an original literary or artistic work, pursuant to a statute usually called the ‘Copyright Act’, or some similar name.” (Duhaim Org, n.d.)  To qualify for protection, the work must be:  original  “fixed in a tangible medium of expression”, no matter how brief  the result of creative effort from its author/authors  Not protected:  Ideas  Facts
  5. 5.  Copyright protects:  written material such as journal articles, novels, poems, song lyrics and reports.  artistic works such as paintings, drawings, cartoons, sculpture, craft work, photographs, maps and plans.  musical works  dramatic works such as plays and mime.  computer programs  compilations such as anthologies, directories and databases.  cinematograph films such as feature films, television programs, and commercials.  sound recordings such as recorded music or a recorded lecture.
  6. 6.  both a moral/ethical and legal issue; usually a defense against infringement  “a doctrine in United States copyright law that allows limited use of copyrighted material without requiring permission from the rights holders, such as use for scholarship or review. It provides for the legal, non- licensed citation or incorporation of copyrighted material in another author's work under a four-factor balancing test.” (Wikipedia, 2009)
  7. 7.  Four factors:  Purpose and character of use – derivative or transformative?  Nature of the copyrighted work  Amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole  Effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work
  8. 8.  Document your sources and keep those records for future use, in the event that your material is questioned.  Give credit when using written material from another book, magazine, newspaper, song, blog, web page, advertisement, television or radio show.   Material can be sourced in a footnote or simply by stating where the information came from after you cite it.  Give credit to anyone that you interview and any material that you use from the interview  Give credit to anyone that you speak with, and quote.  Give credit to anyone that you borrow artwork or images from.  When in doubt, give credit to your source.  That way you’ll always be safe.  Never ever use more than three words in a row from a copy source.  Use ideas, and express them in your own words.  Copyright your work.
  9. 9.  Duhaim Org (n.d.). Copyright. Retrieved from http://www.duhaime.org/LegalDictionary/C/Copyright.aspx  Expert Author Publishing. (2008). The difference between plagiarism and copyright infringement. Retrieved from http://www.expertauthorpublishing.com/articles/the-difference- between-plagiarism-and-copyright-infringement.html  RMIT University. (2009). Copyright, plagiarism and fair use. Retrieved from http://www.rmit.net.au/browse;ID=obcz6j8do3ll  Stanford University Libraries and Academic Information Resources. (2009). Copyright and fair use. Retrieved from http://fairuse.stanford.edu/Copyright_and_Fair_Use_Overview/  Wikipedia. (2009). Fair use. Retrieved on July 26, 2009. from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_use
  10. 10.  Duhaim Org (n.d.). Copyright. Retrieved from http://www.duhaime.org/LegalDictionary/C/Copyright.aspx  Expert Author Publishing. (2008). The difference between plagiarism and copyright infringement. Retrieved from http://www.expertauthorpublishing.com/articles/the-difference- between-plagiarism-and-copyright-infringement.html  RMIT University. (2009). Copyright, plagiarism and fair use. Retrieved from http://www.rmit.net.au/browse;ID=obcz6j8do3ll  Stanford University Libraries and Academic Information Resources. (2009). Copyright and fair use. Retrieved from http://fairuse.stanford.edu/Copyright_and_Fair_Use_Overview/  Wikipedia. (2009). Fair use. Retrieved on July 26, 2009. from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_use

×