Ch 7, Sec 4: Ratification and the Bill of Rights  Main Idea – After heated debates, the 13 states voted one by one to appr...
Federalists Debate Antifederalists <ul><li>Federalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Supporters of the Constitution </li></ul></u...
Federalists Debate Antifederalists <ul><li>Federalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Believed the Articles of Confederation: </li...
Federalists Debate Antifederalists <ul><li>Federalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Used the  Federalists Papers  to: </li></ul>...
Federalists Debate Antifederalists <ul><li>Antifederalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Believed the Constitution: </li></ul></u...
Key Issue:  Need for a Bill of Rights <ul><li>Main objection to the Constitution by the Antifederalists: </li></ul><ul><ul...
The States Vote to Ratify <ul><li>Delaware was the first state to ratify the Constitution on December 7, 1787. </li></ul><...
Adding a Bill of Rights <ul><li>George Washington was elected President and John Adams was chosen as Vice-president </li><...
Adding a Bill of Rights <ul><li>In 1789, James Madison wrote a list of 12 amendments, only 10 of them were ratified and ar...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

7.4 Ratification and the Bill of Rights

1,388 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,388
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
563
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

7.4 Ratification and the Bill of Rights

  1. 1. Ch 7, Sec 4: Ratification and the Bill of Rights Main Idea – After heated debates, the 13 states voted one by one to approve the new Constitution.
  2. 2. Federalists Debate Antifederalists <ul><li>Federalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Supporters of the Constitution </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Antifederalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Against the Constitution </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Federalists Debate Antifederalists <ul><li>Federalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Believed the Articles of Confederation: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Left too much power to individual states </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Made a dangerously weak central gvn’t </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Made disputes between states too difficult for the national gvn’t to function </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Believed the Constitution: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Gave the national gvn’t the authority it needed to function effectively </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Protected rights and powers of individual states </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Federalists Debate Antifederalists <ul><li>Federalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Used the Federalists Papers to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Explain and defend the Constitution </li></ul></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Federalists Debate Antifederalists <ul><li>Antifederalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Believed the Constitution: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Made the national gvn’t too strong and states too weak </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Gave the executive (President) too much power </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Felt the Executive Branch should not be too powerful because: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other Presidents would lack the honor and skill of Washington. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Key Issue: Need for a Bill of Rights <ul><li>Main objection to the Constitution by the Antifederalists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No Bill of Rights </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. The States Vote to Ratify <ul><li>Delaware was the first state to ratify the Constitution on December 7, 1787. </li></ul><ul><li>Rhode Island was the last state to ratify the Constitution on May 29, 1790. </li></ul><ul><li>Many states agreed to ratify the Constitution only if: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A Bill of Rights was added </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Adding a Bill of Rights <ul><li>George Washington was elected President and John Adams was chosen as Vice-president </li></ul><ul><li>New York was the nation’s first capitol </li></ul><ul><li>There is a way to amend, or change, the Constitution </li></ul>
  9. 9. Adding a Bill of Rights <ul><li>In 1789, James Madison wrote a list of 12 amendments, only 10 of them were ratified and are now known as the Bill of Rights </li></ul>

×