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Orienteering: That sounds like fun

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A description of the sport of orienteering aimed at the newcomer to the sport and particularly those high school JROTC students in Florida thinking about trying orienteering for the first time.

Published in: Sports
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Orienteering: That sounds like fun

  1. 1. That sounds like fun! Orienteering
  2. 2. Orienteering is fun. Whether it is recreational, competitive or an outing for the whole family, orienteering is fun. Here’s why . . . .
  3. 3. Orienteering is done on the run, while walking, even in a wheelchair. There is something for everybody.
  4. 4. Orienteers can be anyone from youngsters to youth groups to families to JROTC to top athletes and even old timers. Orienteering is truly a sport for all.
  5. 5. Orienteering can take place in many forms On foot In canoes In a corn maize On skis On horseback On bikes At night On wheelchairs
  6. 6. Where can we go orienteering? Everywhere From Cities To Forests From the Top of the World To the Ocean’s Edge
  7. 7. All orienteering events have this in common: 1) You are using a map and usually a compass 2) You are responsible for deciding your own route.
  8. 8. Pretty well anywhere you go in the world you can find people orienteering and using maps that have a standard look Portugal Japan Denmark USA Israel Jordan Kenya
  9. 9. Orienteering maps are pictorial representations of the land. The maps use a standard set of symbols to show details in five standard colors. Pond
  10. 10. The Colors of an Orienteering Map Brown Landforms like contours pits and knolls
  11. 11. The Colors of an Orienteering Map Brown Blue Landforms like contours pits and knolls Water like lakes, streams and ponds
  12. 12. The Colors of an Orienteering Map Brown Blue Black Landforms like contours pits and knolls Water like lakes, streams and ponds Manufactured features and Rock features
  13. 13. The Colors of an Orienteering Map Brown Blue Black Yellow Landforms like contours pits and knolls Water like lakes, streams and ponds Manufactured features and rock features Open fields / not forested
  14. 14. The Colors of an Orienteering Map Brown Blue Black Yellow Green Landforms like contours pits and knolls Water like lakes, streams and ponds Manufactured features and Rock features Open fields / not forested Thick woods, the darker the green the thicker the woods. Also significant trees
  15. 15. The Colors of an Orienteering Map Brown Blue Black Yellow Green White Purple Landforms like contours pits and knolls Water like lakes, streams and ponds Manufactured features and Rock features Open fields / not forested Thick woods, the darker the green the thicker the woods. Also significant trees The rest. Open runnable woods A special color to show dangerous areas and out-of-bounds. Plus
  16. 16. Add a title, scale and contour information, meridian lines and a legend and you have an orienteering map.
  17. 17. What makes an orienteering competition so special? It is a race. Your time to complete the course is compared to others. But it is not a race on a track where you go round and round It is not like cross country running where everyone follows the same path Those are great sports but they are not orienteering. . . ..
  18. 18. What makes orienteering special can be different things for different people Friendship Love the Outdoors Adventure Lifetime Passion Travel
  19. 19. As new orienteers master more skills they move from Novice to Advanced courses step-by-step. As they ‘move up’ the courses tend to get longer and the navigation more challenging Novice Intermediate Advanced “Sending a beginner out on this Advanced course would be like tossing a non-swimmer in to the deep end of the pool”
  20. 20. But for everyone it comes down to the same problem: How do I get from here to there and in as little time as possible? It is called Route Choice Which route would be best for you? Choice 1: The shortest route but it means going up and down several hills Choice 2: A longer route around to an easy-to-find trail, some short cuts then up a small valley to the control Choice 3: Moderate length, takes out some climb but has an uncertain ‘attack’ to the control
  21. 21. Which route would you choose? Once the orienteer makes a choice the next thing is to navigate that route correctly
  22. 22. The successful orienteer is always: … Checking the map … Noting the features as they are passed … Keeping track of distance travelled … Expecting what is ahead … Planning the best way to ‘attack’ the control … Adjusting speed to the navigation difficulty And… ALWAYS THINKING
  23. 23. You are going to your first orienteering event. What can you expect to happen?
  24. 24. Your team gets together to travel to the event
  25. 25. You will be registered and assigned a start time
  26. 26. You will head to the START. Make sure you take your compass, whistle and timing chip (Finger Stick) After a minute to study your course on the map ….. You are on your way
  27. 27. On course you navigate to the controls on your map, punch in and then it is on to the next control
  28. 28. As soon as you finish you proceed to the Download station where the information on your Finger Stick is transferred to the event computer. You get a record of your time and time to each control Your result is displayed with others on a large monitor and live on the Internet.
  29. 29. Orienteers like to get together to compare their routes to different controls. They know there is a lot to be learned from studying the techniques of others.
  30. 30. It is really nice when the Boosters are there to provide some chow.
  31. 31. With live tracking and replay through Livelox orienteering replays have taken on the appearance of a video game.
  32. 32. Before you know it the day is drawing to a conclusion and it is time for the awards
  33. 33. Awards. . . . . . And Thanks
  34. 34. But Wait There’s More!
  35. 35. Post Race Analysis Results Splitsbrowser graphs Simulated time Real time After a race orienteers and their coaches will use a variety of tools to help improve their next performance. Drawing route on map and studying where things went right and where they went wrong.
  36. 36. Post Race Analysis Event at Mabry Carlton Reserve February 2017 Female Green (Advanced) Course Livelox tracking using GPS in smartphone Livelox tracks orienteers live at the event and is also used to replay the action via storage on the Internet. Coaches replay the action to help show the orienteer where different decisions could lead to a better time
  37. 37. For Florida JROTC events we rank every orienteer in every event giving points for performance. We count the orienteer’s five best results through the year and award certificates at the end of the orienteering season.
  38. 38. So… Read about Orienteering Dream about Orienteering Practice Orienteering And soon you will find out why we call Orienteering “The second most fun you can have in the woods”

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