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Is it Fact or Fake News?

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Is it Fact or Fake News?

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Learn about misinformation and how to avoid it with some fact-checking strategies. Strategies from Mike Caufield's "Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers."

Learn about misinformation and how to avoid it with some fact-checking strategies. Strategies from Mike Caufield's "Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers."

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Is it Fact or Fake News?

  1. 1. Is It Fact or Fake News? Finding truth in the age of misinformation and propaganda
  2. 2. Research Guide https://researchguides.csuohio.edu/ misinformation
  3. 3. What is UP with fake news?
  4. 4. Some Definitions Fake news = ● What are the definitions of “fake news” that you have encountered?
  5. 5. Some Definitions Fake news = ● Authentic content moved to a misleading context ● Imposter sources designed to look like reliable sources we already know ● Clickbait ● False information meant to stir outrage (often partisan) ● News I don't like ● Parody or satire ● More?
  6. 6. Some Definitions Misinformation = inaccurate information that is spread intentionally or unintentionally Disinformation = intentionally inaccurate information meant to deceive
  7. 7. Some Definitions Claire Wardle, FirstDraft
  8. 8. Some Definitions Fact = ● something that is generally not disputed ● by people in a position to know ● by those who can be relied on to accurately tell the truth (Digipo) Truth = ● Being in accord with fact or reality ● Not in discord with other true things ● Other options ...
  9. 9. Fact-Checkable Claims ● Is the claim verifiable? ● Does it claim causation? ● Is it an opinion or preference?
  10. 10. Fact-Checkable Claims Is the claim fact-checkable? “The unemployment rate has decreased by two points in the four months since I became President."
  11. 11. Fact-Checkable Claims Is the claim fact-checkable? “The private sector’s confidence in my government has led to a 2-point decrease in the unemployment figures.”
  12. 12. Fact-Checkable Claims Is the claim fact-checkable? “Without my government, we wouldn’t have seen unemployment fall by two points.”
  13. 13. Flaws in Our Thinking
  14. 14. Types of Bias ● Bias: “a tendency, inclination, or prejudice toward or against something or someone” (Psychology Today) ● Explicit bias: deliberately held beliefs about a person or group ● Implicit bias: beliefs about others or ideas that are outside of our conscious awareness
  15. 15. Confirmation Bias
  16. 16. Types of Bias ● Confirmation bias: seeking information to confirm our beliefs; often called motivated reasoning ● A method of reducing cognitive dissonance (mental discomfort we feel when confronted with conflicting information)
  17. 17. Committing to Facts
  18. 18. So Why Does it Matter?What do you think?
  19. 19. Pro-Truth Pledge https://www.protruthpledge.org/
  20. 20. Fact-Checking Strategies
  21. 21. Four Moves and a Habit
  22. 22. An Example
  23. 23. 1) Check for previous work
  24. 24. 1) Check for previous work
  25. 25. 1) Check for previous work Search terms site:snopes.com site:politifact.com
  26. 26. 1) Check for previous work Search terms site:snopes.com site:politifact.com
  27. 27. 2) Go upstream to the source.
  28. 28. 2) Go upstream to the source. https://www.designb oom.com/design/pla stic-pollution-kills-wh ale-03-10-2018/
  29. 29. 3) Read laterally.
  30. 30. 3) Read laterally. Process ● Reputation for accuracy ● Issue corrections ● Peer review (for scholarly publications)
  31. 31. 3) Read laterally. Expertise ● Credentials ● Education ● Professional experience
  32. 32. 3) Read laterally. Aim ● What incentives are in place for this source to get the facts right? ○ Consider authorial intent, business model, reputational incentives, history, etc.
  33. 33. 3) Read laterally. worlddailynewsreport.com -site:worlddailynewsreport.com
  34. 34. 4) Circle back.
  35. 35. Habit: Check Your Emotions
  36. 36. Let’s Practice!
  37. 37. Revisiting Our Example ... Posted by America’s Last Line of Defence
  38. 38. Practice Fact check these claims: ● LaCroix sparkling water contains insecticides. ● Administrator Adam Brett of Jefferson County, Georgia halted a bus after it had left a county-run senior center to take black voters to cast ballots on the first day of early voting. ● Congressional Democrats voted against a 2.8 percent increase in Social Security benefits scheduled to take effect in January. ● Canada generated enough tax revenue from the first day of legal marijuana sales to pay off its entire national debt.
  39. 39. Practice ● Options: ○ Play factitious, “a game that tests your news sense” ■ http://factitious.augamestudio.com/#/ ○ Play Fakey, a game that tests your ability to find fake news ■ https://fakey.iuni.iu.edu/ ○ Use Fake or Foto to test your ability to recognize digitally altered photos ■ https://area.autodesk.com/fakeorfoto/
  40. 40. You did it!
  41. 41. Questions? Comments? Mandi Goodsett, CSU Librarian a.goodsett@csuohio.edu

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