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E s switch_v6_ch01

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E s switch_v6_ch01

  1. 1. Chapter 1: Analyzing The Cisco Enterprise Campus Architecture CCNP SWITCH: Implementing IP SwitchingCourse v6 Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 1
  2. 2. Chapter 1 Objectives  Describe common campus design options and how design choices affect implementation and support of a campus LAN.  Describe the access, distribution, and core layers.  Describe small, medium, and large campus network designs.  Describe the prepare, plan, design, implement, operate, optimize (PPDIOO) methodology.  Describe the network lifecycle approach to campus design.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 2
  3. 3. Introduction toEnterpriseCampusNetwork Design Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 3
  4. 4. Enterprise Network  Core (Backbone)  Campus  Data Center  Branch  WAN  Internet EdgeChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 4
  5. 5. Regulatory Standards (U.S.)  There may be several legal regulations that have an impact on a network’s design.  US regulations on networks include: • Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) • Sarbanes-Oxley Act • “Records to Be Preserved by Certain Exchange Members, Brokers and Dealers”: Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Rule 17a-4Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 5
  6. 6. Campus Designs  Modular - easily supports growth and change. Scaling the network is eased by adding new modules in lieu of complete redesigns.  Resilient - proper high-availability (HA) characteristics result in near-100% uptime.  Flexible - change in business is a guarantee for any enterprise. These changes drive campus network requirements to adapt quickly.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 6
  7. 7. Multilayer Switches in Campus Networks  Hardware-based routing using Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs)  RIP, OSPF, and EIGRP are supported  Layer 3 switching speeds approximate that of Layer 2 switches  Layer 4 and Layer 7 switching supported on some switches  Future: Pure Layer 3 environment leveraging inexpensive L3 access layer switchesChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 7
  8. 8. Cisco Switches  Catalyst 6500 Family – used in campus, data center, and core as well as WAN and branch • Up to 13 slots and 16 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces • Redundant power supplies, fans, and supervisor engines • Runs Cisco IOS  Catalyst 4500 Family – used in distribution layer and in collapsed core environments • Up to 10 slots and several 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces • Runs Cisco IOS  Catalyst 3560 and 3750 Families – used in fixed-port scenarios at the access and distribution layers  Nexus 2000, 5000, and 7000 Families – NX-OS based modular data center switchesChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 8
  9. 9. Multilayer Switching Miscellany  ASIC-based (hardware)  Catalyst 6500 switches with switching is supported even a Supervisor Engine 720 and with QoS and ACLs, a Multilayer Switch Feature depending on the platform; Card (MSFC3) must 6500 switches support software-switch all packets hardware-based switching requiring Network Address with much larger ACLs than Translation. 3560 switches.  Unlike CPUs, ASICs scale in  ASICs on Catalyst switches switching architectures. work in tandem with ternary ASICs integrate onto content addressable memory individual line modules of (TCAM) and packet-matching Catalyst switches to algorithms for high-speed hardware-switch packets in a switching. distributed manner.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 9
  10. 10. Traffic Types  Network Management – BPDU, CDP, SNMP, RMON, SSH traffic (for example); low bandwidth  IP Telephony – Signaling traffic and encapsulated voice traffic; low bandwidth  IP Multicast – IP/TV and market data applications; intensive configuration requirements; very high bandwidth  Normal Data – File and print services, email, Internet browsing, database access, shared network applications; low to medium bandwidth  Scavenger Class – All traffic with protocols or patterns that exceed normal data flows; less than best-effort traffic, such as peer-to-peer traffic (instant messaging, file sharing, IP phone calls, video conferencing); medium to high bandwidthChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 10
  11. 11. Client-Server Applications  Mail servers  File servers  Database servers  Access to applications is fast, reliable, and secureChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 11
  12. 12. Client-Enterprise Edge Applications  Servers on the enterprise edge, exchanging data between an organization and its public servers  Examples: external mail servers, e-commerce servers, and public web servers  Security and high availability are paramountChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 12
  13. 13. Service-Oriented Network Architecture (SONA)  Application Layer – business and collaboration applications; meet business requirements leveraging interactive services layer.  Interactive Services Layer – enable efficient allocation of resources to applications and business processes through the networked infrastructure.  Networked Infrastructure Layer – where all IT resources interconnect.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 13
  14. 14. Borderless Networks  Enterprise architecture launched by Cisco in October 2009.  Model enables businesses to transcend borders, access resources anywhere, embrace business productivity, and lower business and IT costs.  Focuses more on growing enterprises into global companies.  Technical architecture based on three principles: • Decoupling hardware from software • Unifying computation, storage, and network • Policy throughout the unified system  Provides a platform for business innovation.  Serves as the foundation for rich-media communications.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 14
  15. 15. Enterprise Campus DesignChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 15
  16. 16. Building Access, Building Distribution, and Building Core Layers  Building Core Layer: high- speed campus backbone designed to switch packets as fast as possible; provides high availability and adapts quickly to changes.  Building Distribution Layer: aggregate wiring closets and use switches to segment workgroups and isolate network problems.  Building Access Layer: grant user access to network devices.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 16
  17. 17. Core Layer  Aggregates distribution layer switches.  Implements scalable protocols and technologies and load balancing.  High-speed layer 3 switching using 10-Gigabit Ethernet.  Uses redundant L3 links.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 17
  18. 18. Distribution Layer  High availability, fast path recovery, load balancing, QoS, and security  Route summarization and packet manipulation  Redistribution point between routing domains  Packet filtering and policy routing to implement policy-based connectivity  Terminate VLANs  First Hop Redundancy ProtocolChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 18
  19. 19. Access Layer  High availability – supported by many hardware and software features, such as redundant power supplies and First Hop Redundancy Protocols (FHRP).  Convergence – provides inline Power over Ethernet (PoE) to support IP telephony and wireless access points.  Security – includes port security, DHCP snooping, Dynamic ARP inspection, IP source guard.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 19
  20. 20. Small Campus Network  <200 end devices  Collapsed core  Catalyst 3560 and 2960G switches for access layer(Distribución)  Cisco 1900 and 2900 routers to interconnect branch/WAN (Acceso)Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 20
  21. 21. Medium Campus Network  200-1000 end devices  Redundant multilayer switches at distribution layer  Catalyst 4500 or 6500 switches (aces layer)Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 21
  22. 22. Large Campus Network  >2000 end users  Stricter adherence to core, distribution, access delineation  Catalyst 6500 switches in core and distribution layers  Nexus 7000 switches in data centers  Division of labor amongst network engineersChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 22
  23. 23. Data Center Infrastructure  Core layer – high-speed packet switching backplane  Aggregation layer – service module integration, default gateway redundancy, security, load balancing, content switching, firewall, SSL offload, intrusion detection, network analysis  Access layer – connects servers to networkChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 23
  24. 24. PPDIOO Lifecycle Approach to Network Design and ImplementationChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 24
  25. 25. PPDIOO Phases  Prepare – establish organizational requirements.  Plan – identify initial network requirements.  Design – comprehensive, based on planning outcomes.  Implement – build network according to design.  Operate – maintain network health.  Optimize – proactive management of network.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 25
  26. 26. Lifecycle Approach  Lowering the total cost of  Developing a sound network ownership network design aligned with technical  Increasing network requirements and business availability goals  Improving business agility  Accelerating successful  Speeding access to implementation applications and services  Improving the efficiency of  Identifying and validating your network and of the staff supporting it technology requirements  Reducing operating  Planning for infrastructure expenses by improving the changes and resource efficiency of operational requirements processes and toolsChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 26
  27. 27. Lifecycle Approach (1)  Benefits: • Lowering the total cost of network ownership • Increasing network availability • Improving business agility • Speeding access to applications and services  Lower costs: • Identify and validate technology requirements • Plan for infrastructure changes and resource requirements • Develop a sound network design aligned with technical requirements and business goals • Accelerate successful implementation • Improve the efficiency of your network and of the staff supporting it • Reduce operating expenses by improving the efficiency of operational processes and toolsChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 27
  28. 28. Lifecycle Approach (2)  Improve high availability: • Assessing the network’s security state and its capability to support the proposed de-sign • Specifying the correct set of hardware and software releases, and keeping them opera-tional and current • Producing a sound operations design and validating network operations • Staging and testing the proposed system before deployment • Improving staff skills • Proactively monitoring the system and assessing availability trends and alerts  Gain business agility: • Establishing business requirements and technology strategies • Readying sites to support the system that you want to implement • Integrating technical requirements and business goals into a detailed design and demonstrating • that the network is functioning as specified • Expertly installing, configuring, and integrating system components • Continually enhancing performance  Accelerate access to network applications and services: • Assessing and improving operational preparedness to support current and planned network technologies and services • Improving service-delivery efficiency and effectiveness by increasing availability, resource capacity, and performance • Improving the availability, reliability, and stability of the network and the applications running on it • Managing and resolving problems affecting your system and keeping software applications currentChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 28
  29. 29. Planning a Network Implementation  Implementation Components: • Description of the step • Reference to design documents • Detailed implementation guidelines • Detailed roll-back guidelines in case of failure • Estimated time needed for implementation  Summary Implementation Plan – overview of implementation plan  Detailed Implementation Plan – describes exact steps necessary to complete the implementation phase, including steps to verify and check the work of the network engineers implementing the planChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 29
  30. 30. Chapter 1 Summary  Evolutionary changes are occurring within the campus network.  Evolution requires careful planning and deployments based on hierarchical designs.  As the network evolves, new capabilities are added, usually driven by application data flows.  Implementing the increasingly complex set of business- driven capabilities and services in the campus architecture is challenging if done in a piecemeal fashion.  Any successful architecture must be based on a foundation of solid design theory and principles. The adoption of an integrated approach based on solid systems design principles is a key to success.Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 30
  31. 31. Chapter 1 Labs  Lab 1-1 Clearing a Switch  Lab 1-2 Clearing a Switch Connected to a Larger NetworkChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 31
  32. 32. Resources  www.cisco.com/en/US/productsChapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 32
  33. 33. Chapter # © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 33

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