Ch. 2 and Ch. 3 (7th Edition) ch. 2 (8th Edition) -- The Audience

927 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
927
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ch. 2 and Ch. 3 (7th Edition) ch. 2 (8th Edition) -- The Audience

  1. 1. Chapter 2
  2. 2.  Theatre as a metaphor for daily life  Melodramatic  Highly theatrical  Prima donna  Play-acting  Theatre is an activity that we use to describe how we live 2© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3.  TV shows reflect comic traditions, techniques, characters, and structures developed in theatre  Daytime soap operas  Nighttime situation comedies  Hospital and police shows  Variety shows  News documentaries 3© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  4. 4.  Genres – categories of art work based on style, form or subject matter 4© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  5. 5.  Theatrical genres and specific plays have been appropriated by film  Dreamgirls  Hairspray  Mamma Mia! 5© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  6. 6.  Most film genres borrow from past theatrical traditions  Harry Potter  Batman  Early theatrical audiences were often obsessed with theatrical stars  Many film stars began their careers in theatre  Movie and TV stars perform onstage 6© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  7. 7.  Rock stars often use theatrical comparisons to defend their work  Lady Gaga  Rock stars create theatrical characters by using:  Costumes  Props  Makeup 7© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  8. 8.  Rock stars often act in films and in theatre  Elvis Presley  The Beatles  Madonna  Mark Wahlberg  Ice T  Tupac Shakur  Eminem 8© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  9. 9.  Concerts are highly theatrical events  Music videos are theatrical  Narratives of videos are visual and dramatic Scissor Sisters vs Krystal Pepsy – Shady Love 9© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  10. 10.  Rock is used as the score for musicals  Mamma Mia!  Lennon  All Shook Up  Good Vibrations  Jersey Boys  Jukebox Journey 10© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  11. 11.  Amusement parks present staged productions based on films  Rides incorporate theatricality  ET  Raiders of the Lost Ark  Twilight Zone: Tower of Terror 11© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  12. 12.  Restaurants with theatricalized environments  Rainforest Café  Shopping centers and specialty stores with theatricalized environments  Niketown  American Girl 12© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  13. 13. 13 Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas recreated Venice complete with shops © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  14. 14.  Museums with stage presentations and exhibits that function like stage settings  Dinner theatres  Sports events function like theatre spaces 14© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  15. 15. 15 Black Eyed Peas performing at the Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  16. 16.  Many of the storylines in digital entertainment present a theatrical plotline  Theatrical role-playing websites 16© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  17. 17. Theater (in its purity) – Presentation by live actors of a dramatic work in the presence of an audience Differences between Theatre-Related Activities and Theatre Itself  Recorded performances lack performer- audience interaction  Musical performances, half-time shows, etc. are live performances but make no pretense of dramatic production 17© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  18. 18.  How the Audience Participates 18 Audience always key component in any theater experience. In some cases, audience takes an active role. Shown here is audience at Drumstruck, billed as first interactive drum theater experience at Dodger Stages in NY. Enock Mahlangu plays conductor for the audience. © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  19. 19.  Audience is key in theater  They are a group of people observing, responding to and deeply involved in what is unfolding ▪ We also participate with our imagination ▪ “willing suspension of disbelief”– put aside literal and practical considerations to go on this journey ▪ “aesthetic distance” – physical or psychological separation or detachment from dramatic action, usually considered necessary for artistic illusion © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 19
  20. 20.  Power of Audience  Positive – Political groups use it to educate and to create change – feminist theater, GLBT theater, radical political theater, etc.  Negative – Censorship © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 20
  21. 21.  Diversity of Audiences  Makeup of Audiences: Past and Present  Where We See Theatre ▪ Broadway Theaters – large format theaters ▪ Resident Professional Theaters – mid-size ▪ Under 250 seats – lofts, churches, warehouses, smaller theaters, etc. ▪ College Campuses ▪ Children’s Theater  Audiences Today: Multicultural and Diverse © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 21
  22. 22. 22 The restored Shakespeare’s Globe Theater in London © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  23. 23.  Critic – someone who observes theater and then analyzes and comments on it  Preparing for Criticism  Criticism – “to find fault” but also “to understand and appraise” 23© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  24. 24.  Criteria for Criticism  What is the playwright or production attempting to do? ▪ “auteur director” – a director who believes that his or her role is to be the author of the production as opposed to a director who present the play exactly as a playwright intended  How well has it been done?  Is it worth doing? 24© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  25. 25. 25 Peter Brook’s production of Marat/Sade © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  26. 26. Critics take two approaches Descriptive – describe as clearly and accurately as possible what is happening in the performance Prescriptive – describes what has been done and offers advice and sometimes suggests rules on what should be done These approaches established by ancient critics:  Aristotle (Descriptive)  Horace (Prescriptive) 26© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  27. 27.  Decline of Critics’ and Reviewers’ Influence  The Audience Member’s Independent Judgment 27© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

×