Tecnologías de Alta Disponibilidad en Linux

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  • ELS 101 SUSE Linux Enterprise: Technology Roadmap The SUSE Linux Enterprise family of products empowers businesses to leverage Linux and open source by delivering a robust, high-performance foundation for secure enterprise computing. Built with security, manageability and supportability in mind, SUSE Linux Enterprise products power today's networks and meet the needs of our most demanding users. In this session we will provide a comprehensive overview of the SUSE Linux Enterprise family and show the latest roadmap including upcoming service packs. You will learn about delivered and planned capabilities; whether you are considering solutions for your mission-critical data center and UNIX migration, building out your virtualized infrastructure, looking at green IT enablers, or seeking client computing solutions, we'll show you how technologies provided with SUSE Linux Enterprise can help you implement the best solution.
  • Let's do a brief level set on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) platform, so that you have some context for the following roadmap discussion. Novell's recommended software infrastructure platform is SLE 11. We believe SLE 11 is the most interoperable platform for mission critical computing, suitable for both physical and virtual environments, spanning the desktop to the data center. Companies today are looking for cost-effective IT infrastructure solutions, including versatile platforms that can run both today's and tomorrow's mission critical workloads. SLE offers UNIX-like performance, reliability and scalability, at a Linux-like price. In addition, SLE offers the innovation and investment protection of a relevant, growing Tier 1 platform – one designed and brought to market through an open, transparent development process. More and more companies today are choosing to standardize on SLE as their enterprise Linux platform. Why? Because it is simply the most practical choice for them. It is specifically designed for their needs, with ubiquity, interoperability and mission critical computing in mind. First ubiquity. SLE is designed for ubiquity – to run virtually anywhere – from the desktop to the data center. Enterprises want the flexibility to run their workloads on the hardware they choose (or have), even virtual hardware, and on different form factors, so that they can optimize their data center resources. SLE runs on 5 different processor architectures (x86 32 and 64 bit, Itanium, Power, and s390x), so that you can match workloads to hardware that is particularly suited for that workload. SLE is also designed for virtual environments – optimized to work with leading third party hypervisors – so that you can use mixed physical and virtual resources SLE is designed for emerging cloud environments, and can be customized for appliances. Second interoperability. SLE is designed for maximum interoperability for today's heterogeneous IT environments (mix of classical UNIX, Linux, Windows server and desktop, Mainframe systems, etc.) SLE is designed (e.g. standards, interfaces) to just plug into your existing environment, to help you get the most out of your existing investments, without having to rip and replace whole sections of your data center. We work with partners like Microsoft to maximize interoperability between your Linux and Windows systems. As a result of our technical collaboration, SLE is the “Linux that works with Windows.” Microsoft endorses SLE, and recommends it to their customers that want to use Linux. Finally mission critical computing. SLE is designed for for mission critical workloads – things like ERP systems and databases, as well as mission critical platforms – like the mainframe. Over 4000 applications are certified and supported today on SLE - more than on any other Linux platform. We work with partners like SAP and IBM to not only ensure our platform supports their ERP applications and mainframe hardware, we make sure it works well. As a result, 75% of SAP running on Linux today runs on SLE, and SAP recommends SLE to their customers that use Linux. Approx. 80% of all Linux running on the mainframe today is SLE.
  • Let's do a brief level set on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) platform, so that you have some context for the following roadmap discussion. Novell's recommended software infrastructure platform is SLE 11. We believe SLE 11 is the most interoperable platform for mission critical computing, suitable for both physical and virtual environments, spanning the desktop to the data center. Companies today are looking for cost-effective IT infrastructure solutions, including versatile platforms that can run both today's and tomorrow's mission critical workloads. SLE offers UNIX-like performance, reliability and scalability, at a Linux-like price. In addition, SLE offers the innovation and investment protection of a relevant, growing Tier 1 platform – one designed and brought to market through an open, transparent development process. More and more companies today are choosing to standardize on SLE as their enterprise Linux platform. Why? Because it is simply the most practical choice for them. It is specifically designed for their needs, with ubiquity, interoperability and mission critical computing in mind. First ubiquity. SLE is designed for ubiquity – to run virtually anywhere – from the desktop to the data center. Enterprises want the flexibility to run their workloads on the hardware they choose (or have), even virtual hardware, and on different form factors, so that they can optimize their data center resources. SLE runs on 5 different processor architectures (x86 32 and 64 bit, Itanium, Power, and s390x), so that you can match workloads to hardware that is particularly suited for that workload. SLE is also designed for virtual environments – optimized to work with leading third party hypervisors – so that you can use mixed physical and virtual resources SLE is designed for emerging cloud environments, and can be customized for appliances. Second interoperability. SLE is designed for maximum interoperability for today's heterogeneous IT environments (mix of classical UNIX, Linux, Windows server and desktop, Mainframe systems, etc.) SLE is designed (e.g. standards, interfaces) to just plug into your existing environment, to help you get the most out of your existing investments, without having to rip and replace whole sections of your data center. We work with partners like Microsoft to maximize interoperability between your Linux and Windows systems. As a result of our technical collaboration, SLE is the “Linux that works with Windows.” Microsoft endorses SLE, and recommends it to their customers that want to use Linux. Finally mission critical computing. SLE is designed for for mission critical workloads – things like ERP systems and databases, as well as mission critical platforms – like the mainframe. Over 4000 applications are certified and supported today on SLE - more than on any other Linux platform. We work with partners like SAP and IBM to not only ensure our platform supports their ERP applications and mainframe hardware, we make sure it works well. As a result, 75% of SAP running on Linux today runs on SLE, and SAP recommends SLE to their customers that use Linux. Approx. 80% of all Linux running on the mainframe today is SLE.
  • Let's do a brief level set on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) platform, so that you have some context for the following roadmap discussion. Novell's recommended software infrastructure platform is SLE 11. We believe SLE 11 is the most interoperable platform for mission critical computing, suitable for both physical and virtual environments, spanning the desktop to the data center. Companies today are looking for cost-effective IT infrastructure solutions, including versatile platforms that can run both today's and tomorrow's mission critical workloads. SLE offers UNIX-like performance, reliability and scalability, at a Linux-like price. In addition, SLE offers the innovation and investment protection of a relevant, growing Tier 1 platform – one designed and brought to market through an open, transparent development process. More and more companies today are choosing to standardize on SLE as their enterprise Linux platform. Why? Because it is simply the most practical choice for them. It is specifically designed for their needs, with ubiquity, interoperability and mission critical computing in mind. First ubiquity. SLE is designed for ubiquity – to run virtually anywhere – from the desktop to the data center. Enterprises want the flexibility to run their workloads on the hardware they choose (or have), even virtual hardware, and on different form factors, so that they can optimize their data center resources. SLE runs on 5 different processor architectures (x86 32 and 64 bit, Itanium, Power, and s390x), so that you can match workloads to hardware that is particularly suited for that workload. SLE is also designed for virtual environments – optimized to work with leading third party hypervisors – so that you can use mixed physical and virtual resources SLE is designed for emerging cloud environments, and can be customized for appliances. Second interoperability. SLE is designed for maximum interoperability for today's heterogeneous IT environments (mix of classical UNIX, Linux, Windows server and desktop, Mainframe systems, etc.) SLE is designed (e.g. standards, interfaces) to just plug into your existing environment, to help you get the most out of your existing investments, without having to rip and replace whole sections of your data center. We work with partners like Microsoft to maximize interoperability between your Linux and Windows systems. As a result of our technical collaboration, SLE is the “Linux that works with Windows.” Microsoft endorses SLE, and recommends it to their customers that want to use Linux. Finally mission critical computing. SLE is designed for for mission critical workloads – things like ERP systems and databases, as well as mission critical platforms – like the mainframe. Over 4000 applications are certified and supported today on SLE - more than on any other Linux platform. We work with partners like SAP and IBM to not only ensure our platform supports their ERP applications and mainframe hardware, we make sure it works well. As a result, 75% of SAP running on Linux today runs on SLE, and SAP recommends SLE to their customers that use Linux. Approx. 80% of all Linux running on the mainframe today is SLE.
  • Let's do a brief level set on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) platform, so that you have some context for the following roadmap discussion. Novell's recommended software infrastructure platform is SLE 11. We believe SLE 11 is the most interoperable platform for mission critical computing, suitable for both physical and virtual environments, spanning the desktop to the data center. Companies today are looking for cost-effective IT infrastructure solutions, including versatile platforms that can run both today's and tomorrow's mission critical workloads. SLE offers UNIX-like performance, reliability and scalability, at a Linux-like price. In addition, SLE offers the innovation and investment protection of a relevant, growing Tier 1 platform – one designed and brought to market through an open, transparent development process. More and more companies today are choosing to standardize on SLE as their enterprise Linux platform. Why? Because it is simply the most practical choice for them. It is specifically designed for their needs, with ubiquity, interoperability and mission critical computing in mind. First ubiquity. SLE is designed for ubiquity – to run virtually anywhere – from the desktop to the data center. Enterprises want the flexibility to run their workloads on the hardware they choose (or have), even virtual hardware, and on different form factors, so that they can optimize their data center resources. SLE runs on 5 different processor architectures (x86 32 and 64 bit, Itanium, Power, and s390x), so that you can match workloads to hardware that is particularly suited for that workload. SLE is also designed for virtual environments – optimized to work with leading third party hypervisors – so that you can use mixed physical and virtual resources SLE is designed for emerging cloud environments, and can be customized for appliances. Second interoperability. SLE is designed for maximum interoperability for today's heterogeneous IT environments (mix of classical UNIX, Linux, Windows server and desktop, Mainframe systems, etc.) SLE is designed (e.g. standards, interfaces) to just plug into your existing environment, to help you get the most out of your existing investments, without having to rip and replace whole sections of your data center. We work with partners like Microsoft to maximize interoperability between your Linux and Windows systems. As a result of our technical collaboration, SLE is the “Linux that works with Windows.” Microsoft endorses SLE, and recommends it to their customers that want to use Linux. Finally mission critical computing. SLE is designed for for mission critical workloads – things like ERP systems and databases, as well as mission critical platforms – like the mainframe. Over 4000 applications are certified and supported today on SLE - more than on any other Linux platform. We work with partners like SAP and IBM to not only ensure our platform supports their ERP applications and mainframe hardware, we make sure it works well. As a result, 75% of SAP running on Linux today runs on SLE, and SAP recommends SLE to their customers that use Linux. Approx. 80% of all Linux running on the mainframe today is SLE.
  • HA clusters usually use a heartbeat private network connection which is used to monitor the health and status of each node in the cluster. One subtle, but serious condition every clustering software must be able to handle is split-brain. Split-brain occurs when all of the private links go down simultaneously, but the cluster nodes are still running. If that happens, each node in the cluster may mistakenly decide that every other node has gone down and attempt to start services that other nodes are still running. DRBD (Distributed Replicated Block Device) is a distributed storage system for the Linux platform. It consists of a kernel module, several userspace management applications and some shell scripts and is normally used on high availability (HA) clusters. DRBD bears similarities to RAID 1, except that it runs over a network. Yast-HB stands for the Yast HeartBeat configuration module which has been updated in the SLES 11 HA Stack -the heartbeat configuration is now included in the new Yast moduled for Cluster management. OCFS2 = Orcale Cluster File System v2 – it is Novells default Cluster file system and fully supported x-platform Pacemaker achieves maximum availability for your cluster services by detecting and recovering from node and service-level failures. It achieves this by utilizing the messaging and membership capabilities provided by your preferred cluster infrastructure (currently either OpenAIS or Heartbeat), If the startup and shutdown of your service can scripted, Pacemaker can improve it's availability The OpenAIS Standards Based Cluster Framework is an OSI Certified implementation of the Service Availability Forum Application Interface Specification (AIS).The Application Interface Specification is a software API and policies which are used to develop applications that maintain service during faults. Restarting and failover of applications is also provided for those deploying applications which may not be modified.
  • Tecnologías de Alta Disponibilidad en Linux

    1. 1. Tecnologías de Alta Disponibilidad en Linux Miguel Angel Barajas Data Center Technology Specialist SUSE Linux Enterprise [email_address] @GnuOwned
    2. 2. Clustering <ul><li>High Processing Computing </li><ul><li>Cluster Beowulf </li></ul><li>High Availability </li><ul><li>Windows Cluster Services
    3. 3. Novell Cluster Services
    4. 4. Linux-HA </li></ul><li>Load Balancing(?) </li></ul>
    5. 5. Alta Disponibilidad <ul><li>Mecanismos para garantizar el acceso a los servicios y datos
    6. 6. Redundancia de componentes o servicios
    7. 7. Un tipo de clustering
    8. 8. Para mi, balanceo de carga tambien es alta disponibilidad </li></ul>
    9. 9. Cluster de 2 Nodos HA
    10. 10. Cluster de Balanceo de Carga
    11. 11. SUSE ® Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension HA Stack de 10 a 11 openAIS SLES 10 Yast2-Multipath Pacemaker Part of SLES 10 Added in SLE HA 11 OCFS2 general FS HA GUI Unified CLI OCFS2 / EVMS2 DRBD 0.7 Yast2-HB Heartbeat Yast2-DRBD SLE HA 11 Enhanced Data Replication Web GUI Samba Cluster Added in SLE HA 11 SP1 Metro-Area Cluster Cluster Config Synchronization Storage Quorum Coverage Node Recovery SLE HA 11 SP1

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