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The Future of the Music Industry

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This is a combination of pros and cons, downloading illegal and legal songs, music mashups and the future of the industry of music.

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The Future of the Music Industry

  1. 1. Alexa Buendia-Periera, CarlaCerqueira, Kathrina Hong & Graeme Mollison
  2. 2.  Pros and Cons Mash-ups and Mix-ups Copyrights The Future of the Industry
  3. 3. Alexa Buendia-Periera
  4. 4.  Digital music is known as digital auto. Physical Digital Media is a well known physical source of digital music such as a compact disc. The basic principle of how it works is that a laser reads the surface of the CD. Digital Audio Files are non-physical sources of digital auto such as an mp3 file, which is downloaded from the Internet and can be listened to on the computer or an iPod. Purchasing music off-line or online depends on personal preference. We‟ll be taking a look at some of the pros and cons of digital music online to physical sources of digital music. How the music industry has changed in the last 30 years.
  5. 5.  Easily accessible for  Digital Rights purchasing Management (DRM)  Less workers to sell Lower costs physical music Home audio  Audio quality  Illegal downloading and leaking songs PROS CONS
  6. 6.  Digital music online is easy and simple. Pick a song, click and purchase online, and all in the comfort of your own home. For music labels releasing a digital album would cause less stress instead of a physical album. They wouldn‟t have to deal with distributors and manufacturers pushing back release dates
  7. 7.  Digital music online can be sold individually and by albums, while in stores only albums can be sold. Songs range from $0.99 to $1.29 each and albums at $9.99. Every song will be stored onto the computer instead of having a hard copy of an album until you decide to delete it. It may be convenient to only buy selective song from albums rather than buying all the hard copy albums. Releasing an album online is also cheaper. Press and artwork printing, which is a lot of the cost is reduced. All you need is a website to set up the download demands.
  8. 8.  Everyone has an audio system in there house or a CD player in there car, even though digital music is on your computer it‟s so easy to burn a CD with your favourite songs and listen to them everywhere. Even better now new cars have an audio cord plug where you can plug in an iPod. Making physical CD‟s less in demand And making digital music online more in demand. Unlike back in the day downloading music was more thought about because the songs would be constricted only on the computer.
  9. 9.  DRM is a copyright enforcement system. Which limits what you can do with the song. Limitation varies from each online store to another. When you buy the physical CD it can easily be ripped onto the computer. Giving you full control on what you want to do with your music.
  10. 10.  Since digital music exploded onto the scene many music store locations have shut down Like Sunrise in Erin Mills Town Centre in Mississauga Or music stores have moved into smaller spaces Like HMV in Square One Mall in Mississauga With less of a demand for physical music copies companies are suffering and people are losing jobs.
  11. 11.  Digital music encode song files, which means its song quality may not be as great as you would want it to be. For the greatest quality customers may want a physical copy of an album. Physical album songs are uncompressed and it results to better sound quality.
  12. 12.  Downloading from third-party services or other types or applications allows “customers” to download without paying. When people can get anything free most won‟t typically pass and pay for it instead. Making free music, even though it‟s illegal so easy to do. Top songs from this time change so quickly making paying for every song liked, expensive. Making downloading music for free more justified. $0.99 to $1.29 for every song adds up The end of the month when billed most people will think twice before downloading more songs. That‟s why illegal downloading is so easy to do.
  13. 13.  Leaking albums and songs aren‟t as bad anymore. Artist may not want their album to leak but if it does, they usually embrace it. Saying everyone should have a choice if they like the material before having to purchase it. Artist now-a-days are more understanding about leaks because it‟s uncontrollable now. Artists know real fans will buy their album to support even though they already have a leaked/free digital version. Drake addressing album leaks.  Drake tweeted right after his album leak saying, "I am not sure if the album leaked. But if it did thank god it doesnt happen a month early anymore." "Listen, enjoy it, buy it if you like it...and take care until next time." - Drake
  14. 14. Graeme Mollison
  15. 15. A song or composition created by blending two or more pre-recorded songs. Usually overlaying the vocal track of on song effortlessly over the instrumental track of another. Most common stylistic origins include electronic, pop and rock. Other words for mash-ups are smashups, mix- ups, power mixing, blends and crossovers.
  16. 16.  The practice of assembling mash-ups stretches back to the beginnings of recorded music. Since August 2007, The MashUp Charts has been creating new and innovative songs for your viewing. Many elements of mashup culture have antecedents in hip hop and punk as well as overlap with the free culture movement.
  17. 17. A Vs. B  Putting an acappella against a completely different backing track in order to make a third song is the original missions of mashups.  Go Home Production, Party Ben and DK BC, amongst many others have produced a number of acclaimed songs in the focus of A Vs. B.
  18. 18.  Version Vs. Version  Mixing two or more versions of a song to create a duet or alternative version of a song.  It can mix 2 different versions of a song, such as a Ballad and Original version, or a cover version of the song.  Some of the more popular version-to-version mixes are language mixes. Mixing multiple languages into one song.  They usually have the same instrumental tracks but sometimes it is changed to benefit the song.
  19. 19.  Abstract Mash Ups  These are not intended for the dance floor and are made using all types of music and sounds.  Beat matching and stylistic or aesthetic similarities are not an important factor.  Glitch Pop  The Digital Signal Processing is associated with Kid 606 and Tigerbeat6 records are similar to the contours of pop.  Dirty Pop, which takes a song that is already an epic of carefully constructed digital micro-malfunctions.  In most cases remixes represent mainstream songs avantgarde and fresh.
  20. 20.  Remixes  All mashups are remixes  Most made up are entirely plundered material, some bootleggers have fused old acappellas with completely new compositions of their own devising.
  21. 21.  Not only can you download music mashups, you now are able to create your own. Websites provide you with step-by-step instructions for creating new songs. Music softwares such as,  MAGIX Digital DJ  Music Creator  DJ Mixing  Garage Band  Virtual DJ
  22. 22.  Fair Use is a limitation and exception to the exclusive right granted by copyright law to the author of a creative work. In United States copyright law, fair use is a doctrine that permits limited use of copyrighted material without acquiring permission from the rights holders. It provides legal, unlicensed citation or incorporation of copyrighted material in another author‟s work under a four factor- balancing test.
  23. 23.  Purpose and Character  The first factor is regarding whether the use in question helps the intention of copyright law to stimulate creativity for the general public.  To justify the use is fair, one must demonstrate knowledge or the process of arts through the addition of something new.  A key consideration is the extent to which the use is interpreted as transformative as opposed to derivative
  24. 24.  Nature of the Copied Work  The Supreme Court of the United States has ruled that the availability of copyright protection should not depend on the artistic quality or merit of work.  Fair Use analyses consider aspects of work to be relevant such as whether it is fictional or non- fictional.  To prevent the private ownership of work that rightfully belongs in the public domain, facts and ideas are separate from copyright.  Their particular expression or fixation merits such protection.
  25. 25.  Amount and Substantiality  The third factor assesses the quality of percentage of the original copyrighted work that has been imported into the new work.
  26. 26.  Effects Upon Work‟s Value  The fourth factor measures the effect that the allegedly infringing use has had on the copyright owner‟s ability to exploit his or her original work.  The court not only investigates whether the defendant‟s specific use of the work has significantly harmed the copyright owner‟s market, but also whether such uses in general would harm the potential market of the original.  The burden of proof here rests not on the defendant for commercial uses, but on the copyright owner for noncommercial uses.
  27. 27.  The Copyright Act establishes Fair Dealing in Canada, which allows specific exceptions to copyright protection. The open-ended concept of Fair Use is not observed in Canadian Law. In 1985, the Sub-Committee on the Revision of Copyright rejected replacing fair dealing with an open-ended system. In 1986 the Canadian government agreed that "the present fair dealing provisions should not be replaced by the substantially wider fair use concept."
  28. 28.  2 Many DJs  In 2001, two brothers from the group Soulwax released a mash-up album titled 2 Many DJs.  Each mash-up paired a vocal track from one song with another song‟s instruments.  Featuring music from Beyonce, Nirvana, Christina Aguilera and The Strokes.  Other Beginnings  In 2001, DJ Z-Trip and DJ P released a mash-up album called Uneasy Listening Volume 1.  Containing mashups of music from the 1960s to the 1990s.  Featuring music from Metallica, Public Enemy and AC/DC
  29. 29.  The Grey Album  In 2004, DJ Danger Mouse released The Grey Album combing Jay-Z‟s Black Album with the Beatles White Album.  This album followed the A Vs. B formula for the entire album  It spurned a wide debate about copyright laws and the legally sampling.
  30. 30.  Girl Talk  In 2002, Greg Gillis released the album Secret Diary, under the name Girl Talk.  The album was generated by Girl Talk album including Unstoppable (2004), Night Ripper (2006), Feed The Animals (2008).  Each Girl Talk trach featured more than ten different songs with a variety of genres.
  31. 31.  Each year DJ Earworm delivers with another mashup with contributing songs the past years. He uses songs from the Billboard top 100 to create a mega mix of songs Here is his latest version of United States of Pop 2012.
  32. 32. Carla Cerqueira
  33. 33.  According to theChristianMusicTradeAssociation, „Music piracy is any form of unauthorized duplication and/or distribution of music including downloading, file sharing, and CD-burning.‟ Downloading illegally can result in spending up to five years in jail or up to $250,000 in fines.
  34. 34.  Napster was free for anyone to install. John and Shawn Fanning created Napster in 1999. It allowed people to easily share their MP3 files with other participants for free. The easiness of the site led to huge copyright violations of music and film media. This original site was the start of all the controversy there is today in the fall of the music industry. “It is a fact that thousands of people were, through Napster, making thousands of copies of copyrighted songs and neither the music industry nor the artists made money in return.” People could download hundreds of songs for free instead of buying a CD for $15.
  35. 35.  “Even though Napster was banned from about 40 per cent of U.S. colleges and universities when it was opening its illegal form, some of the biggest users of Napster were college students.” In July 2000, Napster was shut down by a judge in San Francisco. According to an article on BBC News, it claims Napster has cost the music industry more then $300m in lost sales. Napster has over 2,200 users. After being shut down, in 2011 Napster became an online music store, merging with Rhapsody.
  36. 36. Buying = Over $15 Downloading = Free
  37. 37.  More file sharing programs began to arise after Napster. Lime Wire started in 2001, people were able to download CD‟s, movies, shows etc., from just the click of a button for free. The program was shut down in 2012 and came as a shock to everyone. It led people to ask the question, “Where will I get my music from nest?” How Lime Wire was used.
  38. 38.  The use of the internet has changed people‟s careers and the money they make in many ways. Banning some file sharing site‟s will not stop them at all. By 2011 people began coming up with ways to download dongs off of YouTube. Tutorials show you exactly how to do it. There are also websites you can use to download songs by using the URL link.
  39. 39.  According to the Terms of Service on YouTube‟s website it is… “You shall not download any content unless you see a “download” or similar link displayed by YouTube on the service for that content. You shall not copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, broadcast, display, sell, license or otherwise exploit any content for any other purposes without prior written consent of YouTube or the respective licensors of the content. YouTube and its licensors reserve all rights not expressly granted in and to the service and the content.”
  40. 40.  Stealing music is against the law. It deceives the songwriters and recording artists who are making the music because they won‟t be able to earn any profit off of it. Since the decrease in CD sales, artists now earn most of their money off ticket sales from touring and performing shows. It lessens the quality of music. It damages the careers of new artists and up- and-coming bands. Stealing music threatens throusands of working people from recording engineers to producers and record stores.
  41. 41.  With a decrease in CD  An article in Toronto sales, an article on BBC Life shows these News in early 2011 statistics shows that 60 HMV  When adjusted for stores in the UK shut inflation, the music down that year. industry is making less money than any time Since that, HMV stores since the CD was in Canada have been set introduced. to close down as well.  When adjusted for These results in the loss inflation and population, of jobs for many people revenues are lower than anytime since 1973.  People are spending about 1/3 as much on recorded music today ad they did 10 years ago.
  42. 42.  At the end of August 2011, Blockbuster Canada announced that it was closing all its stores. “Each Blockbuster store employs an average of 10 people, meaning about 2,500 people could be out of work.” 1,400 people lost their jobs earlier that summer during the first round of store closures. “About 150 Blockbuster Canada stores were closed in June, as it grappled with a shift to digital downloads, a tepid economy and new ownership of the U.S. Blockbuster chain which left the Canadian chain in debt.” Here is a squib written about it in the Hamilton Spectator.
  43. 43.  What happens to the music industry also has an effect on you. By using software that allows illegal downloads, it opens your computer to pop-ups, pornography ads and viruses. Christian Music Trade Association says:  “The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) can sue for as much as $150,000 per song illegally downloaded.”  “Almost 2000 individuals have been sued by the RIAA for illegally downloading as of March 2004.”  “More than 400 individuals have settled, paying fines averaging $3000.”  “The Department of Justice recently announced the creation of the Intellectual Property Task Force, which examines all aspects of how the DOJ handles intellectual property issues.”
  44. 44. Ji-Yeon Kathrina Hong
  45. 45. CONSIDER THE WAY HOW MANY DIFFERENT WAYS WE HEARD MUSIC IN OUR LIVES.PHONOGRAPH, RECORD PLAYER, VINYL, CASSETTES, 8 TRACK, CD, MP3, IPOD, ITUNES, YOUTUBE, BLOGS, LIVE CONCERTS. . . EVEN IN MY EARLY TEENS, MP3S AND IPODS WERE UNHEARD OF. EVERYONE HAD STACKS OF CD‟S IN CD HOLDERS, CARS HAD CASSETTE TAPE PLAYERS AND SO DID PEOPLE JOGGING IN THE STREETS. IT WAS OBVIOUS PEOPLE AT THIS TIME BOUGHT PRODUCTS OF MUSIC BECAUSE DOWNLOADING ON THE INTERNET WAS NOT AS EASY AND ACCESSIBLE. CLEARLY, MUSIC IN A PHYSICAL FORM WAS SEEN MORE AS A PRODUCT AS WERE THE ARTISTS THAT WERE POPULAR IN THE EARLY 90‟S. POP BOY BANDS LIKE BACKSTREET BOYS, NSYNC, AND POP FEMALE ARTISTS LIKE BRITNEY SPEARS AND SPICE GIRLS WERE MARKETING TOOLS BY THE MUSIC INDUSTRY. THIS IS EVIDENT BECAUSE IT WAS NOT JUST ABOUT MUSIC, THESE ARTISTS WERE MADE INTO TOYS, POSTERS, MADE CLOTHING LINES, PERFUMES, ACCESSORIES, COSMETICS AND EVEN MADE MOVIES.
  46. 46. SHIFT IN THE POTENTIAL OF MUSIC AS BOTH AN ART FORM AND A COMMERCIALLY SALEABLE PRODUCT CAME AT THE END OF THE 19TH CENTURY WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOUND RECORDING TECHNIQUES. IT WAS THOMAS EDISON WHO INVENTED THE PHONOGRAPH IN 1877…TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES IN THE QUALITY AND EASE OF RECORDING FOLLOWED, BUT IT WASN‟T UNTIL THE COLUMBIA PHONOGRAPHIC CORPORATION NOTICED THE INTEREST ITS PRODUCTS ATTRACTED AT FAIRS AND PENNY ARCADES THAT SOUND RECORDING‟S POTENTIAL FOR ENTERTAINMENT WAS REALLY RECOGNIZED.” (Harris, J. 2012)FROM THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY TO NOW, THE CONCEPT OF THAT QUOTATION HAS SIGNIFICANTLY EXPANDED. THE TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES IN THE QUALITY, TYPES OF RECORDED MUSIC AND OVERALL PRACTICALITY AND EASY ACCESS TO MUSIC HAS CHANGED NOT ONLY THE MUSIC INDUSTRY BUT HOW PEOPLE VIEW MUSIC.PERSONALLY, I HAVE NO ISSUES PURCHASING MUSIC. I AM A VINYL COLLECTOR AND OFTEN SPEND ON ONE RECORD MUCH MORE THAN IF IT WAS ON ITUNES OR CD. I ALSO BELIEVE IN SUPPORTING ARTISTS AND SINCE I ENJOY LIVE MUSIC, I SPEND AND SUPPORT MUSIC BY GOING TO CONCERTS, BUYING ALBUMS AND MERCHANDISE. I THINK THAT PEOPLE DO NOT HAVE PROBLEMS PAYING FOR PRACTICALITY, EASY ACCESS OR CONVINIENCE HOWEVER, ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO DIGITAL FORMS OF MUSIC, SINCE IT IS SO EASY TO ILLEGALLY DOWNLOAD, WHY PAY IF YOU CAN GET IT FOR FREE SO EASY?
  47. 47. FINANCIALLY THE MUSIC INDUSTRY IS WEAKLING (ANNUALLY, THE TOTAL SALES OF RECORDED MUSIC FOR THE WHOLE WORLD ADDED UP TO ABOUT ONE TENTH OF WALMART‟S TURN OVER).” (Harris, J. 2012)THE MUSIC INDUSTRY HAD TO CHANGE WITH THE CHANGE OF TIME AND TECHNOLOGY. THE MUSIC INDUSTRY IS LESS ABOUT MUSIC AND MORE ABOUT MARKETING, PROMOTING AND ADVERTISING. THE MUSIC INDUSTRY MUST QUICKLY INVENT AND PROMOTE NEW IDEAS, NEW STARS AND CONCEPTS TO KEEP THE ATTENTION OF PEOPLE. FOR EXAMPLE, TELEVISION STATIONS SUCH AS MTV AND MUCHMUSIC, BOTH COMPANIES ONCE WAS A TRUE MUSIC TELEVISION STATION, HOWEVER NOW, IT IS FULL OF REALITY TV AND DRAMAS AND FOCUSES VERY LITTLE ON MUSIC.IT WAS THE INTERNET AND THE EASILY ATTAINABLE AND ACCESSIBLE DOWNLOADING THAT CHANGED EVERYTHING ABOUT MUSIC AND STILL CONTINUES TO IMPACT THE INDUSTRY TODAY.
  48. 48. 70 PERCENT OF 18- TO 29-YEAR-OLDS SAID THEY HAD BOUGHT, COPIED OR DOWNLOADED UNAUTHORIZED MUSIC… COMPARED WITH 46 PERCENT OF ALL ADULTS WHO‟D DONE THE SAME.” (Irvine, M. 2012)THE INTERNET MADE EVERYTHING CONVINIENT. THE INTERNET OFFERS VARIOUS DIFFERENT WAY TO LISTEN, OBTAIN AND DOWNLOAD MUSIC. FROM WEBSITES THAT LINK VARIOUS SOURCES TO DOWNLOAD FROM SUCH AS PIRATEBAY, YOUTUBE, WEBSITES THAT ALLOW USERS TO CONVERT YOUTUBE VIDEOS IN TO MP3, MYSPACE, FACEBOOK, BAND WEBSITES, STREAMING AND MANY MORE CAN BE DONE WITH JUST COUPLE CLICKS.WITH SO MANY PEOPLE DOWNLOADING, BUYING AND COPYING UNAUTHORIZED MUSIC, WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT?
  49. 49. CONGRESS IS CONSIDERING CONTROVERSIAL ANTI-PIRACY BILLS THAT WOULD, AMONG OTHER THINGS, FORBID SEARCH ENGINES FROM LINKING TO FOREIGN WEBSITES ACCUSED OF COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT. AND THERE ARE LAWSUITS PITTING MEDIA HEAVYWEIGHTS AGAINST INTERNET FIRMS – NOTABLY VIACOM‟S BILLION-DOLLAR LITIGATION AGAINST YOUTUBE.” (Irvine, M. 2012)THIS HAS SPARKED MANY CONVERSATIONS AS WELL AS SOCIAL MOVEMENT WHEN IT COMES TO THIS ISSUE. FOR EXAMPLE. WIKIPEDIA WAS SHUT DOWN FOR A DAY KNOWN AS “BLACK OUTS” TO PROTEST FOR THE FEDERAL ANTI-PIRACY BILLS.IT IS UNDERSTOOD WHY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IS PLACING ANTI-PIRACY BILL. HOWEVER, I BELIEVE THAT THIS WILL CAUSE THE INTERNET TO BE DRASTICALLY DIFFERENT THAN IT IS TODAY. SOCIAL MEDIA WOULD NOT BE ABLE TO EXIST AND SITES SUCH AS FACEBOOK, YOUTUBE, TUMBLR AND ANY OTHER BLOGGING SITES, WIKIPEDIA, GOOGLE.. EVERYTHING WOULD BE SHUT DOWN DUE TO PIRACY.
  50. 50. IF THE ANTI-PIRACY BILL IS PASSED, “THE BILL WOULD ALLOW THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND INDIVIDUAL COPYRIGHT HOLDERS TO TAKE LEGAL ACTION AGAINST WEBSITES THAT FACILITATE PIRACY, FORCIBLY REMOVING THEM FROM SEARCH ENGINES AND PROHIBITING PAYMENT PROCESSING COMPANIES FROM WORKING WITH THEM. IT WOULD ALSO CRIMINALIZE AND CREATE PRISON SENTENCES OF UP TO FIVE YEARS FOR THE ACT OF STREAMING OF COPYRIGHTED CONTENT.” (Sapieha, C. 2012)I WONDER IF ANY OF THE POLITICIANS AND LAWYERS OR EVEN THEIR FAMILY THAT WROTE THIS BILL HAVE NEVER ILLEGALLY DOWNLOADED OR STREAMED COPYRIGHTED CONTENT. I AM ALMOST 100% SURE THEY HAVE. ANYONE WITH INTERNET AND A COMPUTER MOST LIKELY HAVE, WITH OR WITHOUT KNOWING.THE FUTURE IN MUSIC AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY IS INCREDIBLY COMPLEX AND UNPREDICTABLE. BUT PEOPLE ARE ACTING AND PROTESTING UPON IT.“THE STOP ONLINE PIRACY ACT, A BILL INTRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES LAST FALL BY TEXAS REPUBLICAN LAMAR SMITH, IS LOSING THE SUPPORT…” (Sapieha, C. 2012)
  51. 51. IT IS EVIDENT THAT PEOPLE ARE TAKING POLITICAL ACTION TOWARDS THIS ANTI- PIRACY BILL THAT COULD CHANGE THE FUTURE OF MUSIC DRASTICALLY.THE INTERNET ALSO CREATES OPPORTUNITIES AND POSITIVE IMPACTS IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY AS WELL. DESPITE ALL THE NEGATIVITY TOWARDS DOWNLOADING AND COPY RIGHT INFRINGMENT, THE INTERNET ALLOWS MUSIC THAT IS NOT MAINSTREAM OR INDEPENDENT BANDS AND LABELS TO BE HEARD.THESE INDEPENDENT OR SMALL BANDS ARE ABLE TO FREELY ADVERTISE AND EXPOSE THEIR MUSIC TO THE PUBLIC AND USE SOCIAL MEDIA TO THEIR ADVANTAGE. THE INTERNET ALLOWS INDEPENDENT BANDS TO SOCIALIZE WITH SIMILAR BANDS AND WITH AUDIENCES, BUILD AUDIENCE AS WELL AS SELL MUSIC AND MERCHANDISE. THERE ARE MANY „STARS‟ OUT THERE THAT STARTED FROM YOUTUBE AND BLOGGING. IF THE PIRACY ACT WAS PASSED, WOULD REGULAR PEOPLE HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO GROW LIKE JUSTIN BEIBER OR LANA DEL RAY?
  52. 52. THROUGH MY RESEARCH AND SPEAKING TO FRIENDS AND FAMILY ABOUT THIS CONFUSING, CONTROVERSIAL TOPIC OF PIRACY, MUSIC DOWNLOADING AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY, IT WAS EVIDENT THAT MANY PEOPLE FELT THAT IF PRODUCTS WERE NOT AS EXPENSIVE, THAN THEY WOULD MOST LIKELY PURCHASE IT.FOR EXAMPLE, CANADIANS PAY SEVEN TO EIGHT DOLLARS FOR UNLIMITED AMOUNTS OF STREAMING MOVIES AND TELEVISION SHOWS ON NETFLIX. THIS IS A BRILLIANT CONCEPT BECAUSE THE COST IS REASONABLE AND IT IS CONVINIENT.IF 70 PERCENT OF YOUNG PEOPLE ARE ILLEGALLY DOWNLOADING, THE INDUSTRY NEEDS TO UNDERSTAND WHY THEY ARE. YOUNG PEOPLE UNDER THE AGE OF 19 DO NOT HAVE CREDIT CARDS AND WILL NOT BE ABLE TO PURCHASE DIGITAL MATERIALS, YOUNG PEOPLE IN POST SECONDARY DO NOT HAVE THE CASH TO SPEND ON DIGITAL MATERIALS ESPECIALLY WHEN IT CAN BE OBTAINED FOR FREE
  53. 53. FOR MANY PEOPLE I BELIEVE DOWNLOADING AND PIRACY IS A CONVINIENCE ISSUE AS WELL. WHY GO OUT AND BUY CDS TO BURN ON TO THE LAPTOP TO PLACE ON THEIR MP3 PLAYERS WHEN THEY CAN EASILY DOWNLOAD INSTANTLY AND HAVE THE FILES ON THE COMPUTER.WE LIVE IN A TIME WHERE EVERYTHING IS FAST PACED AND PEOPLE DON‟T HAVE TIME OR THE PATIENTS TO GO LOOK FOR ENTERTAINMENT. FOR EXAMPLE, RECENTLY ALL BLOCKBUSTER STORES IN BURLINGTON, ON, HAS CLOSED DOWN BECAUSE PEOPLE DO NOT RENT MOVIES ANYMORE DUE TO THE INTERNET, PIRACY AND SITES LIKE NETFLIX THAT PROVIDE CONVINIENT SERVICES. INSTEAD OF THE MUSIC INDUSTRY FOCUSING ON PASSING THIS HARSH, OVER THE TOP ANTI-PIRACY BILL, THEY SHOULD FOCUS ON NEW WAYS TO APPROACH THE PUBLIC AND PURHAPS COME UP WITH A COMPROMISE OF SOME SORT.IF THE MUSIC INDUSTRY CAN COME UP WITH A SYSTEM LIKE ITUNES BUT WAS REASONABLY PRICED, I DON‟T THINK PIRACY WOULD BE AN ISSUE TODAY.

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