Creating Engaging Learning Experiences that also Yield Evidence of Learning

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Creating Engaging Learning Experiences that also Yield Evidence of Learning

  1. 1. THAT ALSO YIELD EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Creating Engaging Learning Experiences A Workshop for Emmanuel College Faculty Developed by Gail Matthews-DeNatale, Ph.D. Associate Director of Academic Technology at Simmons College
  2. 2. An Ambitious Agenda <ul><li>Understanding of the Learner (20 minutes) - “Engaging Learning” Warm-Up Exercise - Follow-up resources to consider </li></ul><ul><li>Ideas and Strategies for Course Planning/Design (30 minutes) - Considering Outcomes and Evidence First - Backward Design Exercise </li></ul><ul><li>Questions and Discussion (10 minutes) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Understanding the Learner Photo by Ben Werdmuller, available through Creative Commons license at http://flickr.com/photos/benwerd/185925362/
  4. 4. When Have You Experienced Engaging Learning? <ul><li>Format: Think, Pair, Share </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect on the most memorable learning experiences you've had in your life. You don’t have to limit yourself to school-based (formal) learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Pick one specific example to tell your neighbor . </li></ul><ul><li>“ Two breath” introduction of neighbors using these stories. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Dee Fink’s “Significant Learning” Taxonomy Source: http://www.ou.edu/pii/significant/WHAT%20IS.pdf
  6. 6. Other Dimensions and Perspectives Learning In General Example: John Bransford and Ann Brown
  7. 7. Other Dimensions and Perspectives Understanding Students as Individuals Example: Howard Gardner
  8. 8. Other Dimensions and Perspectives Understanding Generational Differences Example: Diana Oblinger
  9. 9. The Challenge of Course Design Shift our attention from learner to learning
  10. 10. Strategies for Course Design <ul><li>My journey as a course developer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Circa 1989: First task is to select the textbook and/or readings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Circa 1994: First task is to select the course activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Today: First task is to clarify goals and desired outcomes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Try Your Hand: Backward Design Exercise </li></ul>
  11. 11. Backward Design <ul><li>Format: Reflect, Select, Brainstorm </li></ul><ul><li>What are your goals for your students ? What associated questions will engage and excite them? </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on one goal for one course that you would like to improve. What kinds of evidence would you need to assess their progress toward this goal? </li></ul><ul><li>Turning to your neighbor, brainstorm ideas for activities that would produce this evidence. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Stages in Backward Design 1 2 3 http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/books/mctighe2004_intro.pdf

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