<ul>Oshawa Victory Garden Project </ul><ul>Engaging the community by re-creating a successful   initiative from WW1 and WW...
<ul>Topics </ul><ul>1. The Organization: Foundation for Building Sustainable Communities (fbsc.org) 2. Victory Gardens 3. ...
<ul>Foundation for Building Sustainable Communities (fbsc.org) </ul><ul><ul><li>Incorporated as not for profit in 2003 </l...
<ul>Projects </ul>
<ul>Allies </ul><ul>-  IEEE Humanitarian Initiatives - TD Canada -Royal Canadian Legion, Branch #43 - City for Oshawa - Ve...
<ul>What is a Victory Garden? </ul><ul><li>During WW 1 and WW 2, the Allies had a Home Front strategy which involved the w...
 
<ul>Impact of Victory Gardens </ul><ul>Victory Gardens were: </ul><ul>-home based or city allotments; -provided 40% of the...
<ul>Examples </ul><ul>Parks were divided into community garden and allotments. Citizens picked up shovels, rakes and hoes....
The Mall in Washington
Alexander Park in Oshawa </li></ul>
<ul>Oshawa Victory Garden </ul><ul><li>A component of a larger initiative to educate, inspire and engage people.
Our organic produce is donated to local food banks
Over 200 pounds already delivered. </li></ul>
<ul>Cultivating the Idea </ul><ul>We choose the Victory Garden model because it is an easily replicated historical project...
<ul>Garden Layout </ul><ul><li>Based upon a 1943 Ministry of Agriculture design
Typical urban plot size </li></ul><ul>- 25 by 50 feet </ul><ul><li>Family scale </li></ul>
<ul>Garden Layout </ul><ul>Timeline </ul><ul><li>Planning
Breaking the soil
Garden layout
Planting
Daily watering and weeding
Fertilizing </li></ul><ul>. </ul>
<ul>.. </ul>
<ul>Our Message </ul><ul><li>Remember  “Green Acres”  Fun living is the place to be....
Most people have access to a backyard or a community garden
A small time commitment creates a bountiful harvest </li></ul>
<ul>  </ul>
<ul>  </ul>
<ul>Growing Forward </ul><ul>Short Term </ul><ul><li>Partner with the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 43 to host a fall Victo...
Outreach and education to the public
Harvest  and delivery of food to Feed the Need in Durham </li></ul>
<ul>Growing Forward </ul><ul>Long term plan: </ul><ul><li>300 residents growing  a Victory Garden in the next five years
Broaden the cycle to include storage, home canning and meal preparation
Certification, mentorship and support programs for the gardeners
Integration of the concept into the common curriculum in Ontario
Create more synergistic collaboration with community partners </li></ul>
<ul><li>Victory Gardens are a simple but effective way to empower people to grow their own food </li></ul><ul><li>A cost e...
For more information about the  Oshawa Victory Garden Http://oshawavictory Garden.wordpress.com
 
<ul><li>Rationing and the WW 2
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Victory Garden and Rationing in Canada

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Two presentations leading up to Remembrance Day on Nov. 11
See pictures of event
http://www.flickr.com/photos/glennmcknight/sets/72157627768113599/

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Victory Garden and Rationing in Canada

  1. 2. <ul>Oshawa Victory Garden Project </ul><ul>Engaging the community by re-creating a successful initiative from WW1 and WW2 Operated by the F oundation for B uilding S ustainable C ommunities (fbsc.org) </ul>
  2. 3. <ul>Topics </ul><ul>1. The Organization: Foundation for Building Sustainable Communities (fbsc.org) 2. Victory Gardens 3. Oshawa Victory Garden Project 4. Growing Forward </ul>
  3. 4. <ul>Foundation for Building Sustainable Communities (fbsc.org) </ul><ul><ul><li>Incorporated as not for profit in 2003 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mandate : to preserve and repair the environment and to ameliorate the living conditions of the underprivileged </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mission : to cultivate sustainable sensibilities </li></ul></ul>
  4. 5. <ul>Projects </ul>
  5. 6. <ul>Allies </ul><ul>- IEEE Humanitarian Initiatives - TD Canada -Royal Canadian Legion, Branch #43 - City for Oshawa - Veterans Affairs - UOIT - Ontario Ministry of Transportation - Ontario Ministry of Energy - Ontario Power Generation - Robert Bell, Sales Representative, Guide Realty LTD Brokerage </ul>
  6. 7. <ul>What is a Victory Garden? </ul><ul><li>During WW 1 and WW 2, the Allies had a Home Front strategy which involved the weapons of community, cooperation and gardening to fuel the spirit of victory. </li></ul><ul><li>Front yards, back yards and parks were converted from flowers and grass to food. </li></ul><ul><li>It was a way to provide food and a way for everyone to do their part for the war effort. </li></ul>
  7. 9. <ul>Impact of Victory Gardens </ul><ul>Victory Gardens were: </ul><ul>-home based or city allotments; -provided 40% of the food production during the war; - significant food source for city dwellers -In many cases an extra source of family income </ul>
  8. 10. <ul>Examples </ul><ul>Parks were divided into community garden and allotments. Citizens picked up shovels, rakes and hoes. Public spaces were converted into food gardens, examples: </ul><ul><li>Hyde and Regent Parks in London,
  9. 11. The Mall in Washington
  10. 12. Alexander Park in Oshawa </li></ul>
  11. 13. <ul>Oshawa Victory Garden </ul><ul><li>A component of a larger initiative to educate, inspire and engage people.
  12. 14. Our organic produce is donated to local food banks
  13. 15. Over 200 pounds already delivered. </li></ul>
  14. 16. <ul>Cultivating the Idea </ul><ul>We choose the Victory Garden model because it is an easily replicated historical project. We have documented our progress with pictures, blogs and videos.  FBSC wanted to showcase how urban farming is a viable local endeavor  </ul>
  15. 17. <ul>Garden Layout </ul><ul><li>Based upon a 1943 Ministry of Agriculture design
  16. 18. Typical urban plot size </li></ul><ul>- 25 by 50 feet </ul><ul><li>Family scale </li></ul>
  17. 19. <ul>Garden Layout </ul><ul>Timeline </ul><ul><li>Planning
  18. 20. Breaking the soil
  19. 21. Garden layout
  20. 22. Planting
  21. 23. Daily watering and weeding
  22. 24. Fertilizing </li></ul><ul>. </ul>
  23. 25. <ul>.. </ul>
  24. 26. <ul>Our Message </ul><ul><li>Remember “Green Acres” Fun living is the place to be....
  25. 27. Most people have access to a backyard or a community garden
  26. 28. A small time commitment creates a bountiful harvest </li></ul>
  27. 29. <ul>  </ul>
  28. 30. <ul>  </ul>
  29. 31. <ul>Growing Forward </ul><ul>Short Term </ul><ul><li>Partner with the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 43 to host a fall Victory Garden Heritage Dinner
  30. 32. Outreach and education to the public
  31. 33. Harvest and delivery of food to Feed the Need in Durham </li></ul>
  32. 34. <ul>Growing Forward </ul><ul>Long term plan: </ul><ul><li>300 residents growing a Victory Garden in the next five years
  33. 35. Broaden the cycle to include storage, home canning and meal preparation
  34. 36. Certification, mentorship and support programs for the gardeners
  35. 37. Integration of the concept into the common curriculum in Ontario
  36. 38. Create more synergistic collaboration with community partners </li></ul>
  37. 39. <ul><li>Victory Gardens are a simple but effective way to empower people to grow their own food </li></ul><ul><li>A cost effective and healthy source of nutritious food. </li></ul><ul><li>Surplus benefits the hungry </li></ul><ul><li>Proven concept that encourages community participation </li></ul><ul><li>What is old is new again! Victory Garden's are a timely concept. </li></ul>
  38. 40. For more information about the Oshawa Victory Garden Http://oshawavictory Garden.wordpress.com
  39. 42. <ul><li>Rationing and the WW 2
  40. 43. The Battle of the Home Front </li></ul>
  41. 44. <ul><li>Rationing was the norm for the war years with 11 million ration books issued </li></ul>
  42. 47. <ul><li>A ration of two pounds per person per week became effective in May, 1942
  43. 48. Or
  44. 49. 1 1/2 oz of meat per meal </li></ul>
  45. 51. <ul><li>2 oz of loose tea per week
  46. 52. 8 oz of ground coffee per week
  47. 53. During the war years the family portions were halved
  48. 54. Restaurants served one cup per person </li></ul>
  49. 55. <ul><li>Beginning late January 1942, each person was allowed 12 ounces per week
  50. 56. 1 oz=6 tsp.
  51. 57. By May 1942 it was down to 8 ounces per week or 48 tsp
  52. 58. Today, we eat on average 22 teaspoons per day </li></ul>
  53. 59. Rations include: Maple syrup products, table syrups, molasses, apple or honey butter, and canned fruits. On 23 August, 1943 jams, jellies, marmalade, and honey were put in the rationed category. By October evaporated milk was just for priority use.
  54. 60. Late in 1944, sugar rationing became even more stringent. An article in the press revealed the need for sugar in the production of shells and bombs and molasses for synthetic rubber. Molasses was a special food item for Maritimers. They had a long tradition of slathering it on bread and there was consternation when it first became short in 1943.
  55. 62. What about Liquor and Cigarettes?
  56. 63. Other goods such as cigarettes and alcohol were never officially rationed, but were often in short supply with higher prices, Some shopkeepers kept their limited stocks for their favourite customers
  57. 64. Rationing continued after the war ended. Meat, which had been taken off the list in February 1944, was back on in September 1945. The need for an increased supply for devastated Europe was urgent. An editorial in the Journal stated – &quot;Paradoxical as it may appear, peace has created a greater food problem than there was at any time during the war.
  58. 65. The last Ration Book was issued in September 1946.
  59. 66. Rationing, Non Compliance and Black Market
  60. 67. <ul><li>Black Markets thrived for all types of items </li></ul>
  61. 68. <ul><li>Inspectors were assigned to inspect vehicles for the colour of the gas
  62. 69. General stores and Butcher shops were scrutinized by three million volunteer women who watched carefully the prices and goods for possible inflation and devious shopkeepers </li></ul>
  63. 70. <ul>For more information visit </ul><ul><li>Oshawa Victory Garden
  64. 71. Http://oshawavictorygarden.wordpress.com
  65. 72. Glenn McKnight and Robert T Bell </li></ul>

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