Emily Dickinson The Belle of Amherst
This is my letter to the world, That never wrote to me,--  The simple news that Nature told,  With tender majesty.  Her me...
Biography <ul><li>Born December 10, 1830 in Amherst, MA. </li></ul><ul><li>Educated at Amherst Academy. </li></ul><ul><li>...
Dickinson in Love? <ul><li>The Master Letters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Unknown man </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Samuel Bowles </li>...
Was She Weird? <ul><li>Known for being a recluse, she didn’t leave her family’s homestead for any reason after the late 18...
Dickinson’s Poetry <ul><li>Regular meter—hymn meter and ballad meter, also known as Common meter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Qua...
Dickinson’s Publishing Career <ul><li>Sent poems to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a literary critic and family friend. </li>...
Posthumous Publication <ul><li>After her death, her poems were heavily edited and published by Higginson and friend Mabel ...
What’s the Difference? BECAUSE I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me; The carriage held but just ourselves ...
Dickinson’s Legacy <ul><li>Dickinson died May 15, 1886 of nephritis (kidney disease). </li></ul><ul><li>Dickinson is consi...
Interesting Websites  <ul><li>For the complete works of Emily Dickinson:  http://www.bartleby.com/113/ </li></ul><ul><li>E...
 
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Glynn Power Point Project

  1. 1. Emily Dickinson The Belle of Amherst
  2. 2. This is my letter to the world, That never wrote to me,-- The simple news that Nature told, With tender majesty. Her message is committed To hands I cannot see; For love of her, sweet countrymen, Judge tenderly of me!
  3. 3. Biography <ul><li>Born December 10, 1830 in Amherst, MA. </li></ul><ul><li>Educated at Amherst Academy. </li></ul><ul><li>At 17, began college at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary; she became ill the spring of her first year and did not return. </li></ul><ul><li>She would leave home only for short trips for the remainder of her life, leading scholars to speculate she may have been agoraphobic . </li></ul>
  4. 4. Dickinson in Love? <ul><li>The Master Letters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Unknown man </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Samuel Bowles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dickinson’s editor </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Susan Gilbert </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dickinson’s sister-in-law </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Was She Weird? <ul><li>Known for being a recluse, she didn’t leave her family’s homestead for any reason after the late 1860’s. </li></ul><ul><li>She almost always wore white. </li></ul><ul><li>She often lowered snacks and treats in baskets to neighborhood children from her window, careful never to let them see her face. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Dickinson’s Poetry <ul><li>Regular meter—hymn meter and ballad meter, also known as Common meter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quatrains </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alternating tetrameter and trimeter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Often 1 st and 3 rd lines rhyme, 2 nd and 4 th lines rhyme in iambic pentameter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The use of dashes </li></ul><ul><li>Influenced by nature and spiritual themes </li></ul>
  7. 7. Dickinson’s Publishing Career <ul><li>Sent poems to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a literary critic and family friend. </li></ul><ul><li>He recognized her talent, but tried to “improve” them, which made Dickinson lose interest. </li></ul><ul><li>At the time of her death, only seven of her poems had been published. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Posthumous Publication <ul><li>After her death, her poems were heavily edited and published by Higginson and friend Mabel Loomis Todd. </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Johnson produced a collection of Dickinson’s more than 1700 poems in three volumes in 1955; he restored her original capitalization and punctuation. </li></ul>
  9. 9. What’s the Difference? BECAUSE I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me; The carriage held but just ourselves And Immortality. We slowly drove, he knew no haste, And I had put away My labor, and my leisure too, For his civility. We passed the school where children played, Their lessons scarcely done; We passed the fields of gazing grain, We passed the setting sun. Because I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me; The carriage held but just ourselves And Immortality. We slowly drove, he knew no haste, And I had put away My labor, and my leisure too, For his civility. We passed the school, where children strove At recess, in the ring; We passed the fields of gazing grain, We passed the setting sun. An excerpt of poem 712, or “Because I could not stop for Death, called “ The Chariot” by Higginson and Todd. On the left is the edited version; on the right, the original. Note the major changes in lines 9 and 10.
  10. 10. Dickinson’s Legacy <ul><li>Dickinson died May 15, 1886 of nephritis (kidney disease). </li></ul><ul><li>Dickinson is considered influential to poets such as Adrienne Rich, Richard Wilbur, Archibald MacLeish, and William Stafford. </li></ul><ul><li>Along with Walt Whitman, Dickinson is one of the two giants of American poetry of the 19 th century. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Interesting Websites <ul><li>For the complete works of Emily Dickinson: http://www.bartleby.com/113/ </li></ul><ul><li>Emily Dickinson -- &quot;The Soul Selects Her Own Society” Video- Clip- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.learner.org/catalog/extras/vvspt/video/dickinson.html </li></ul>

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