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Running Dry: Smart Waterand Leak DetectionSteven WindsorMarch 2013 1   Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All...
Agenda           Global Survey: Water stress, barriers & answers           Defining ―smart water‖           The analyti...
Survey Details     The Economist Intelligence Unit conducted a survey of 244 senior       water utility executives across ...
Increased water stress is a foregone conclusion       For most water utilities, increased water stress by 2030 is        a...
Increased water productivity is the core       To ensure sufficient supplies, utilities are making wide-        ranging pr...
Wasteful consumer behavior is largest barrier       Across much of the world, water flows out of taps at almost no cost to...
A far greater focus on demand management is    expected       The historical response to rising water demand has been     ...
The water industry is experiencing a quiet    boom in innovation       Worldwide, utilities are experimenting with new    ...
Water Interdependencies                                                                                            Sustain...
The history of smart waterFor the past 20 years, water monitoring has included real- time control and supervision, and adv...
Defining Smart Water: A System of SystemsNetwork:          Sensors, Meters and actuators deployed throughout the gridCommu...
Setting The Analytical Foundation         Any Data,                                                Full Range of    Integr...
Defining The Analytical Objectives                                                                                        ...
Defining The Reference Model                                                            Reference Model                   ...
Moving from Insights to Action                                                            ContentLeveraging the full Range...
Understanding the Water Balance                                     Billed                                        Billed M...
Reasons for Apparent Losses     • Customer meter inaccuracies                                 Current Annual Apparent     ...
Managing Real Losses     • Active leakage management                                                                   Pot...
Strategies for Reducing LossesRationalizing the criteria and priorities toward a NRW reduction strategy:•        Economics...
DMA – District Metering AreaImproving the Network TopologyFROM:                       Open Water Network System           ...
NRW: Active Management              SCADA / GIS                                                    NETWORK                ...
ALR: Awareness – Location – Repair Resource Planning and Scheduling                                       Common Dispatchi...
District Metering Area: Analytical Approach                                                                               ...
Suggestions on Where to Start     First Step:                                                                             ...
Key figures for business justification     Water – Loss Reduction     • Reduced costs from water loss and increase revenue...
Moving from Reactive to Proactive                                                                      • Quality Incidents...
Moving beyond 2013•        Smart Water Networks exist, but still need to become standard and widely adopted•        AquaEc...
Questions                                                                   When the well                                 ...
29   Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights     reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
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Running dry smart water and leak detection by steven windsor

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Running dry smart water and leak detection by steven windsor

  1. 1. Running Dry: Smart Waterand Leak DetectionSteven WindsorMarch 2013 1 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  2. 2. Agenda  Global Survey: Water stress, barriers & answers  Defining ―smart water‖  The analytical foundation  Detecting leaks – reducing losses  The business case2 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  3. 3. Survey Details The Economist Intelligence Unit conducted a survey of 244 senior water utility executives across the ten countries under review. All respondents hailed from the management function of their businesses, with close to one-half (45%) consisting of C-suite executives. Organizations of all sizes were polled: 13% have annual revenue in excess of US$1bn, while 40% are firms with under US$250m in revenue. Nearly one-half (48%) are owned by either the state or a local municipality; the balance are privately owned, barring 6% which operate as public-private partnerships.3 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  4. 4. Increased water stress is a foregone conclusion For most water utilities, increased water stress by 2030 is a foregone conclusion. About four in ten executives (39%) polled for this report think that, given current trends, national water demand in their countries will outstrip supply by 2030. A further 54% think such a risk is moderately likely. But the nature of such stress varies hugely, depending on local circumstances. •4 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  5. 5. Increased water productivity is the core To ensure sufficient supplies, utilities are making wide- ranging productivity improvements—everything from plugging leaks to recycling more water. Investments are rising as well. Across the ten countries polled, 93% of respondents say they are increasing their investment in water production facilities. More than one in five (22%) utilities surveyed will increase investment by 15% or more in the next three years.5 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  6. 6. Wasteful consumer behavior is largest barrier Across much of the world, water flows out of taps at almost no cost to the user. Nearly half (45%) of utilities—especially in developed markets—see this as their biggest barrier to progress, while a further 33% believe that tariffs are too low to stimulate greater investment.. In developing countries, a lack of capital for investment tops the list of concerns (selected by 41%), while worries over climate change are close behind (38%). Regulatory difficulties, along with persistent difficulties in attracting the right skills, further deepen the challenge.6 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  7. 7. A far greater focus on demand management is expected The historical response to rising water demand has been to build up supply and distribution networks, but much more emphasis is now being put on cutting water use. From both a strategic and technological perspective, new metering and usage awareness programmes top the measures utilities believe will help reduce use. Such measures are effective: research suggests a 10- 15% average drop in usage once a meter is installed.7 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  8. 8. The water industry is experiencing a quiet boom in innovation Worldwide, utilities are experimenting with new techniques, such as improved desalination and aquifer recharging methods. Desalination innovations are appearing in far-flung locations, from California to Queensland. Network sensors and smart meters, which often link back to consumers’ smart phones, are helping utilities both to moderate demand and to find costly leaks more accurately. Nonetheless, more than one in three (36%) utilities surveyed say they are generally unaware of the innovation options available to them.8 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  9. 9. Water Interdependencies Sustainability & Climate • Water & Waste Cycle • Energy conservationGrowing Growing GrowingEnergy needs Population density Personal Mobility • Emissions management Urbanization & Mobility • Smart HomesUncertain Growing Growing • Smart TransportFuel Supply Urbanization Aging Society • Always connected Energy & Resources • Smart Grid & Meters • Renewable energy • Demand managementGrowing Growing GrowingResource needs Commodity Prices Global Warming 9 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  10. 10. The history of smart waterFor the past 20 years, water monitoring has included real- time control and supervision, and advanced hydrological modelling.But technology, and needs, have grown. We now have:• Ubiquitous availability of IT and Communication resources• Continous deployment of advanced sensing and actuators• More data enabling new services and actionable insights• Constantly increasing demand and expansion of distribution• Regulatory compliance of water quality and sustainability and CO2 emissions,• Need CAPEX/OPEX balancing and long-term investment & maintenance planning10 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  11. 11. Defining Smart Water: A System of SystemsNetwork: Sensors, Meters and actuators deployed throughout the gridCommunication: Low latency, Multi-Modal, real-time communication linksData Acquisition: Validation, supervision and complex event processingInformation: Dashboards of Key Performance Indicators, TrackersAsset & Service: Maintenance strategies, field service and schedule optimizationSimulation: What-If scenario analysis, weather, network planning Sense Data Inform Act11 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  12. 12. Setting The Analytical Foundation Any Data, Full Range of Integrated On Tablet Any Source Analytics Analytic On Mobile Applications On Device12 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  13. 13. Defining The Analytical Objectives Business Performance Business and Revenue Management Customer Reduced Cost Customer Satisfaction Structures Operational Performance Sustainable BusinessOperation Assets Infrastructure Compliance & Employee Reliability Growth Engagement Network Performance Defining the dashboard for the different lines of business: • Customer: Interactions, satisfaction, revenue, days sales outstanding • Service: Number of complaints, issue resolution, escalations • Finance: Cost recovery, plan/actual deviation, project performance • Operation: Response time, schedule adherence, service complaints • Maintenance: Availability, pipe breaks, Unaccounted for Water, order completion 13 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  14. 14. Defining The Reference Model Reference Model What? Activity (Simplified example) type Avg completion time?Leveraging the What % normal Activities full Range of reads? How much? Water Utility Timely Interval Reads? Unreported Data Sources What % without measurements? usage? Measurements Performance Planed / actual Devices Event type distribution? Most frequent exceptions? Installation status? SCADA Events & Network Real-Time Exceptions Model Technologies Relational Multi-Dimensional Unstructured14 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  15. 15. Moving from Insights to Action ContentLeveraging the full Range of Water Utility Data Sources Tools Reporting & Modeling & Unstructured Predictive Analysis Planning Analytics Analytics15 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  16. 16. Understanding the Water Balance Billed Billed Metered Consumption Revenue Authorized Authorized Consumption Billed Unmetered Consumption Water Consumption Unbilled Unbilled Metered Consumption Authorized Consumption Unbilled Unmetered Consumption System Input Commercial / Unauthorized Consumption Volume Apparent Customer Meter Inaccuracies, Non-Revenue Losses Data, Billing and Accounting Errors Water Water Losses Leakage on Transmission and Distribution Mains Physical / Real Leakage and Overflows at Reservoirs Losses Leakage on service connections up to metering Non-Revenue Water = System Input Volume – Billed Authorized Consumption16 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  17. 17. Reasons for Apparent Losses • Customer meter inaccuracies Current Annual Apparent Losses • Unauthorized consumption and Economical Level illegal connections, theft and fraud • Data analysis errors between Unavoidable historical, actual and billing data Apparent Losses • Data collection and transfer errors between meter and billing system Analytical Insight Transforming Data into Reduction of Apparent Losses17 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  18. 18. Managing Real Losses • Active leakage management Potentially Recoverable Real Losses • Improving speed and quality of ALR Economical Level of Awareness, Location, Repair Real Losses • Optimization of the pressure Unavoidable management in the system Real Losses • Increased asset reliability and economical maintenance strategy Analytical Insight Transforming Data into Reduction of Real Losses18 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  19. 19. Strategies for Reducing LossesRationalizing the criteria and priorities toward a NRW reduction strategy:• Economics: Determining the cost of NRW versus the cost of water• Process: Assessment and analysis of business processes and best practices• Integration: Integration of business, engineering and operational areas• Data Analytics: Transforming data silos into actionable business insights NRW – Cost Assessment ALR – Process Assessment Cumulative water lost over time Volume of Water Lost Economic Total Cost = Cost of Water lost + Level of NRW Cost of NRW Management Cost of water lostCosts Cost of NRW Awareness Location Repair Management Time NRW 19 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  20. 20. DMA – District Metering AreaImproving the Network TopologyFROM: Open Water Network System Water is fed from different water treatment plants into an interconnected pipe network. NRW can only be approximated for the entire system.TO: Zoned Water Network Systems (DMA) The pipe network is divided into smaller and hydraulically isolated zones which allow a more accurate and manageable NRW calculation.DMA design consideration• Size of the DMA (number of connections, pipe length, etc.)• Network configuration (number of flow meters, number of valves)• Topographic features (urban, rural, ground level variations, etc.)• Data Loggers (flows, pressure, legitimate night flows, sonar, etc.)• Establishing and calibrating a hydrological flow model20 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  21. 21. NRW: Active Management SCADA / GIS NETWORK ERP / EAM/ CIS Telemetry Feeds Work & Service Performance Customer Billing Records Dispatch Tracking Grid Model / Geo-Coding Meter Data and Location Storm and Weather Hydrological/Pressure Model Link Consumption & Address Hydrologic / Pressure Data District Metering Area Financial & Tariff Information Sanitation levels Loggers & Asset conditions Asset History & Performance Valve/Pump/Reservoir Feeds Meter testing & Certification Water Cycle and Water Balance Insight Model Real-Time Updates GIS SCADA / Weather CAD Field Operations & Mobile Planning System Enterprise Asset Performance Manual / One-Lines Grid Sensors / Valve Controls Customer Information System21 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  22. 22. ALR: Awareness – Location – Repair Resource Planning and Scheduling Common Dispatching Functionality Mobile Communication Platform• Real-time scheduling for optimal • Web browser based Dispatcher • Best practice workflows for field assignments and routing interface resources using a wide variety of mobile devices• Takes into account complex • Context driven KPI’s and alerts to factors and rules such as skills, allow for exception based • Secure asynchronous timing, location, cost goals, etc Dispatching communication• Scheduling without boundaries • Map Viewer to show crews, their • Store and forward for activities, their routes disconnected completions when necessary 22 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  23. 23. District Metering Area: Analytical Approach Actionable insight: • Reducing NRWBilling Levels • From leak detection to pipe rehabilitationNetwork Metering • Prioritization of budgets and investments • Improved asset life via pressure management • Safeguarding continuous supply and water quality Data Inform Act23 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  24. 24. Suggestions on Where to Start First Step: Implementation Costs • Establishing high level High Medium Low cost / benefit matrix •Leakage on mains • Technical assessment of current •Unauthorized •Unbilled metered Low Medium High NRW Volume Impact •Leakage on service consumption consumption situation and performance connections • Organized processes for •Customer metering •Customer meter •Pressure collecting, normalizing, geo-tagging replacement inaccuracies and data Management and associating data handling errors •Unbilled unmetered •Reservoir leakage •Reservoir overflows Second Step: consumption • Validating /adjusting data with real measurements • Calibrating network model • Reviewing analytical approach and integrity of NRW-calculations • Improving ALR and billing processes Third Step: Monitoring and institutionalizing continuous improvement process24 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  25. 25. Key figures for business justification Water – Loss Reduction • Reduced costs from water loss and increase revenues • Reducing energy and chemical consumption • Increase billing accuracy NRW decreases Increased Asset Performance Revenue Investments increase and are made in • Increase asset longevity and lower cost of operational Cost further NRW reduction decrease programs maintenance • Improved Infrastructure leakage Index (ILI) Expenditure is increased • Reduced pipe breaks / faster ALR turnaround time to include operational improvement Better Service • Guaranteeing continuous quality water supply • Reduction of waterborne diseases (biological, mineral, chemical contamination) • Improved water service quality (pressure, coloration, odor, salination, etc.)25 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  26. 26. Moving from Reactive to Proactive • Quality Incidents • Leakage • Preventive Asset planning • Asset Integrity Prevention • Network & Pressure • Grid Performance • Reducing ALR- Modeling • Financial Results TimeObjectives • Optimizing DMA setups • DMA MonitoringAnalysis & Reactive Proactive Historical Predictive Decisions Decision Decision Assessment Assessment Making MakingTimeframe Current Conditions Past Time t=0 Future Time 26 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  27. 27. Moving beyond 2013• Smart Water Networks exist, but still need to become standard and widely adopted• AquaEconomics – investments into intelligence are understood & largely ROI positive• Communication and communication links are becoming part of Smart City platforms• Data acquisition is benefitting from IoT, electricity and ICT innovations• Analytics has evolved from a passive data holder into a new business resourceBUTA Solid ICT Platform and high fidelity Data Analytics are needed to achieve sustainedNRW reductions, active leakage prevention and real-time Water Balance insight. Sense Data Inform Act 27 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  28. 28. Questions When the well is dry, we know the worth of water. Benjamin Franklin (1706-90)28 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
  29. 29. 29 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.

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