Integrated urban water managementExperiences from Ethekweni Municipality, South Africa                          Jay Bhagwa...
Principles of IUWM     • IUWM means that in the planning and operation of urban       water management, consideration shou...
3/28/2013   3
Brief Statistics                  •   3,6 million people                  •   Area increased by 68% to 2297 sq km         ...
A Municipality Of Contrasts3/28/2013                                 5
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3/28/2013   9
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3/28/2013   11
Challenges•   Poverty and job creation•   Food security•   Energy constraints•   Migration•   Growing informal areas•   Wa...
The institutional context• It is rare to find an integrated approach to themanagement of water, sanitation, solid wastedis...
3/28/2013   14
3/28/2013   15
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Illegal Connections3/28/2013                         17
BENEFICIATION STRATEGIES•   Non-revenue water management•   Improving service levels•   Re-use of treated effluent•   Biod...
3/28/2013   19
Multiple levels of service• Three levels   – Regulated supply of     200kl per day (free     basic)   – Semi – pressure   ...
NRW Plan      – Reduce real losses              • NRW by volume for            •   AC Mains replacement      2006/2007 – 3...
Intervention for Reduction – Real Losses                • Rezoning - New Pressure Standard -2.5bar –                  6bar...
Non-Revenue Water                InterventionsLeakage control    14 600km                   25 400 leaksReplace AC Mains R...
ResultsThis program has realised  savings of R310m in the  past 3 financial years at  EWS at a cost of R152.6m   3/28/2013...
Savings due to InterventionsNo                Description                    Saving .1 Leak Detection                     ...
Water Reuse                                            Advantages for the metro council (EWS)Delayed capital              ...
Benefits•    At operational capacity (47.5 Ml/d) the reclamation plant meets 7% of    the city’s current potable water dem...
Energy• Mainly linked to reducing carbon  footprint through the use of  renewable energy• 10Mw of hydro generating capacit...
3/28/2013   29
METHANE TO ELECTRICITY• 28 wastewater treatment works     (WWTW)• which treat over 460 ML/day of     sewage, producing• th...
LaDePa sludge pelletisation3/28/2013                                 31
Benefits3/28/2013              32
AGROECOLOGY PROGRAMME• earthworks and landscaping to  capture water run-off in the soil to  secure water for the crops bey...
Thank You3/28/2013               34
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Integrated urban water management experiences from ethekweni municipality south africa by jay bhagwan

  1. 1. Integrated urban water managementExperiences from Ethekweni Municipality, South Africa Jay Bhagwan Executive Manager Water Research Commission
  2. 2. Principles of IUWM • IUWM means that in the planning and operation of urban water management, consideration should be given to the interaction and collective impact of water related processes* on issues such as human health, environmental protection, quality of receiving waters, water demand, affordability, land and water-based recreation, and stakeholder satisfaction. Individual processes should then be planned and managed in such a way that the collective impact be optimised as far as possible. – The difference between sustainable water management and integrated water management is not always clear. – Essentially sustainability is the goal, and integrated management a strategy for pursuing the goal*Water-related processes in urban environments include potable water supply; sanitation (ranging from pit latrines to fullwater-borne sewerage and treatment); water reuse; environmental flows; water demand management; solid waste management;industrial water and waste management; urban drainage; water-based recreation; and environmental protection. 3/28/2013 2
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  4. 4. Brief Statistics • 3,6 million people • Area increased by 68% to 2297 sq km • 646 000 properties • Supply 908 Ml/day of water from 9 Treatment Works • Treat 500 Ml/d of Waste Water • 263 Water Reservoirs • 27 Waste Water Treatment Works • 7 000 km of sewer mains • 12 000km of water mains • 445 000 water connections • Combined annual expenditure of R4.3bn (2010/11) • Municipal budget 2010/11 R23.5bn3/28/2013 4
  5. 5. A Municipality Of Contrasts3/28/2013 5
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  12. 12. Challenges• Poverty and job creation• Food security• Energy constraints• Migration• Growing informal areas• Water demand• Climate variability OPPORTUNITY – RESOURCE - BENEFICIATION3/28/2013 12
  13. 13. The institutional context• It is rare to find an integrated approach to themanagement of water, sanitation, solid wastedisposal and storm water• In South Africa there is even fragmentation ata national, policy and regulatory level• The environment is socio-politicallydominated• A difficult environment3/28/2013 13
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  17. 17. Illegal Connections3/28/2013 17
  18. 18. BENEFICIATION STRATEGIES• Non-revenue water management• Improving service levels• Re-use of treated effluent• Biodiesel from Microalgae• Deep row entrenchment of sludges• Sludge beneficiation through pelletisation• Mini and pico hydro• Water Reuse• Rainwater harvesting• Use of effluents in agriculture• Stormwater and drainage• AGROECOLOGY PROGRAMME3/28/2013 18
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  20. 20. Multiple levels of service• Three levels – Regulated supply of 200kl per day (free basic) – Semi – pressure – Full pressure• Benefits – Reduce demand – Reduce peaks – Reduces pressure on infrastructure3/28/2013 20
  21. 21. NRW Plan – Reduce real losses • NRW by volume for • AC Mains replacement 2006/2007 – 30.6% • Active leak detection • Pressure reduction • NRW by volume for • Rezoning 2009/2010 – 37.5% • Improving reservoir • Target for June 2013 – integrity 28% loss (R175m pa – Reduce apparent losses savings) • Illegal connection • Target for June 2018 – rectification 25% loss (ILI 4.5) • Billing data integrity improvements – 2% NRW reduction • Improve meter accuracy per annum is realistic.3/28/2013 21
  22. 22. Intervention for Reduction – Real Losses • Rezoning - New Pressure Standard -2.5bar – 6bar (225 designed /300 commissioned) • Advanced pressure management (optimising existing + controllers) (57 sites) • Active prv Maintenance (2500 inspections) • GSM based failure detection devices on prv’s (100) • Leak detection (7500km / 9000 leaks) • AC mains relay (incl rezoning + replace connection pipes) (1800 km) • New Fault Manager software to assist with analysis of faults data. Improve speed and quality of repairs. • Reservoir overflows (incl response time) • Reservoir integrity (leaks)3/28/2013 22
  23. 23. Non-Revenue Water InterventionsLeakage control 14 600km 25 400 leaksReplace AC Mains R550mPressure 48m to 40m in Umlazi (20%Reduction reduction in non-revenue water)Install Meters 12 000 (Inanda, Umbumbulu, Folweni)Bulk Meters 240 reservoirs3/28/2013 23
  24. 24. ResultsThis program has realised savings of R310m in the past 3 financial years at EWS at a cost of R152.6m 3/28/2013 24
  25. 25. Savings due to InterventionsNo Description Saving .1 Leak Detection R4,5m2 Installation of 4 000 water meters in R8,5m Inanda3 Pressure Reduction R6,0m4 Advanced pressure control on 10 sites R1,1m5 Top 200 consumer meter programme R9,8m6 Meter change out programme R4,4m7 Informal area rectification R1,4m Total R35,7m3/28/2013 25
  26. 26. Water Reuse Advantages for the metro council (EWS)Delayed capital investment (marine outfall and potable supply• Direct industrial reuse of infrastructure) •No capital investment for recycling plant wastewater •Long term revenue stream from a recycled water levy •Reduced cost of water services to Durban’s citizens• Commissioned in 2001 •Reduces treated wastewater discharge by 10% • Treats 47.5 Ml/day of domestic Advantages for the end-users (Mondi Paper and Sapref) 44% reduction in water tariff (2001) for Mondi and industrial wastewater to a •Likelihood that the price of recycled water will escalate at a lower rate than potable water near potable standard •Enhanced security for water supply in times of drought • Sales to industrial consumers for direct use in their processes• Public Private Partnership eThekwini Water Services with Durban Water Recycling (Pty) Ltd3/28/2013 26
  27. 27. Benefits• At operational capacity (47.5 Ml/d) the reclamation plant meets 7% of the city’s current potable water demand• The potable water that was previously drawn by industrial consumers is available for redistribution to previously disadvantaged, peri-urban communities without the need to invest in major bulk water supply and treatment infrastructure. Used to extend supply to up to 220 000 household in the greater Durban area.• Reduce demand on the resource. Thus the project serves to scientifically protect and ensure the sustainable development of the existing available water resources of the city.• EWS treats 470 Ml/d of wastewater. Of this volume, approximately 200 Ml/d is discharged to sea as screened and degritted wastewater.• The reclamation project reduces the city’s total treated wastewater discharge by 10% and reduces the partially treated load on the marine environment by up to 24% (v/v).3/28/2013 27
  28. 28. Energy• Mainly linked to reducing carbon footprint through the use of renewable energy• 10Mw of hydro generating capacity planned• Pico hydro generating on reservoir inlets planned – estimated 30 Mw• Constructed a large scale raceway to grow algae and harvest for biofuel and biomass production.• Deep row entrenchment of sludges3/28/2013 28
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  30. 30. METHANE TO ELECTRICITY• 28 wastewater treatment works (WWTW)• which treat over 460 ML/day of sewage, producing• the equivalent of 100 tons of sludge per day• 10 operate anaerobic digesters• and it is the aim of the EWS to convert the methane• produced at the larger of these WWTWs into electricity.• Approximately 50% of the power used by the works can be3/28/2013 30 supplied by the methane
  31. 31. LaDePa sludge pelletisation3/28/2013 31
  32. 32. Benefits3/28/2013 32
  33. 33. AGROECOLOGY PROGRAMME• earthworks and landscaping to capture water run-off in the soil to secure water for the crops beyond the rainy season and prevent soil erosion;• planting of perennial crops and food trees that hold eThekwini’s steep slopes in place while providing a diversity of foods into the future• the use of appropriate renewable technologies to augment the water supply to gardens.• helping growers with training and basic infrastructure• 3000 gardens (equating to 60,000 job opportunities)3/28/2013 33
  34. 34. Thank You3/28/2013 34

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