An integrated approach to the AMCOW gender       strategy: productive/multiple water uses                                 ...
Policy                                 formulated                                     andTargets &     Cooperation        ...
Defining ‘gender equality in water’• Equal rights, responsibilities and opportunities in economic,  social, cultural and p...
Unpacking ‘gender equality in water’     a) water: a special resource– water uses require different quantities/qualities– ...
Unpacking ‘gender equality in water’:      b) users and professionalsAs water users: multiple uses for multiple livelihood...
access to      Socio-economic,                             political gender                                     0         ...
Indicators for users’ livelihoods:  beyond the domestic-productive divide1. Alleviate women’s/girls’domestic chores as a p...
Indicators for users’ livelihoods:MUS to homesteads: a universal human right?                            50-100 lpcd; 5 lp...
Indicators for water uses Example village water users counts           TechnologyWater                        Number of be...
Indicators for water uses-PLUS• PLUS: equal opportunities to make beneficial use of water   – Hygiene education, also for ...
Indicators for control over technologies:    as target group of public investments (any uses)Equality in planning:• needs ...
Indicators for control over technologies:          as investors in own technologies• Investing in own collective technolog...
Indicators for control over technologies            as professionals• As public service providers, policy makers, and priv...
Indicators for control over water resourcesAs users• Water resources allocation   – equal distribution of water   – non-di...
Thank you for your attention       Water for a food-secure world               www.iwmi.org
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An integrated approach to the AMCOW gender strategy: productive/multiple water uses by Barbara van Koppen

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Presentation made by Barbara van Koppen, Rural Sociologist & Gender Expert at IWMI, World Water Week, August 26-31, 2012, Stockholm, Sweden

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An integrated approach to the AMCOW gender strategy: productive/multiple water uses by Barbara van Koppen

  1. 1. An integrated approach to the AMCOW gender strategy: productive/multiple water uses Barbara van Koppen Concrete Actions: Gender, Water and Food Security Stockholm Water Week 2012 Photo: David Brazier/IWMI Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  2. 2. Policy formulated andTargets & Cooperation implemented Human and and financialindicators coordination strengthened resources mobilizedfor M&E, targets &AMCOW’s Human and indicators Project institutional approachesgender capacity at all levels at all levels genderequality developed Strategic knowledge sensitive produced,in water shared and applied Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  3. 3. Defining ‘gender equality in water’• Equal rights, responsibilities and opportunities in economic, social, cultural and political aspects of water development and management• Equal valuing of gender similarities and differences (risk of sexual assaults, domestic chores, etc)• Indicators towards equality: assess gender gaps and set ambitious, time-bound indicators for closing the gaps Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  4. 4. Unpacking ‘gender equality in water’ a) water: a special resource– water uses require different quantities/qualities– domestic uses are universal; productive uses are context-specific– water is one, and not necessarily the limiting input– water storage and conveyance (labor, technologies) is costly Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  5. 5. Unpacking ‘gender equality in water’: b) users and professionalsAs water users: multiple uses for multiple livelihood benefits• As target group or customers of public investments• As investors in own private technologiesAs public and private water professionals:• As public service providers, resource managers and policy makers• As parastatal and private water business women/men! Complex relationships between these two categories ! Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  6. 6. access to Socio-economic, political gender 0 resources equality in all classes Land, Gendered water needsSkills, credit, and potentialssafety markets Equal water uses a Equal control over water technologies Equal control over water resources
  7. 7. Indicators for users’ livelihoods: beyond the domestic-productive divide1. Alleviate women’s/girls’domestic chores as a priorityacross the water sector 2. Also recognize women as producers with context-specific productive water needs across the water sector; both as female heads of households and as spouses in family-based production. Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  8. 8. Indicators for users’ livelihoods:MUS to homesteads: a universal human right? 50-100 lpcd; 5 lpcd safe ‘most MDG per drop’ resilient food and income…. health time ..from crops ..from enterprise..from livestock ..from fish
  9. 9. Indicators for water uses Example village water users counts TechnologyWater Number of beneficiaries by gender (Number/sources and vulnerability status sites)Surface Direct use 70 poor women domesticstreams 20 poor men cattle 1 Dam 10 less poor men irrigators 5 less poor women irrigators 5 less poor men cattle dry season 3 Fishpond 5 less poor men 1 Irrigation 20 poor and 5 less poor men irrigatorsGround 5 Shallow 30 poor womenwater wells 3 Boreholes 25 less poor women Community-gardenRain water 15 households for multiple uses harvesting Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  10. 10. Indicators for water uses-PLUS• PLUS: equal opportunities to make beneficial use of water – Hygiene education, also for men – Safety/privacy in water transport and sanitation – Secure land tenure (homesteads, fields) – Access to production factors: Inputs, capital, credits, extension, skills, markets, electricity connections, etc. Distinguish: individuals, female heads of households, and spouses in intra-household production relations (e.g. joint titling) – ETC• Requires strategic partnerships of water sector with other initiatives ! Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  11. 11. Indicators for control over technologies: as target group of public investments (any uses)Equality in planning:• needs assessment and prioritization,• technology choice, siting and/or land re-allocation, compensation in displacement• training on technical know-how, construction employment and pay• operation, maintenance, and monitoring; trainingEquality in Water User Associations membership and leadership• Context specific quota? – > 50% for domestic uses and women-managed productive uses; – < 50% for male-dominated productive uses. Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  12. 12. Indicators for control over technologies: as investors in own technologies• Investing in own collective technologies: – Inclusion in community planning, construction, operation and maintenance institutions for self-supply• Investing in private technologies: – Equal access to technologies (land tenure security, information, technical training, capital, etc) Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  13. 13. Indicators for control over technologies as professionals• As public service providers, policy makers, and private water business women/men – Equality in education, training and job opportunities at all levels Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  14. 14. Indicators for control over water resourcesAs users• Water resources allocation – equal distribution of water – non-discrimination in plural water laws (e.g. customary water law; permits vested in individuals or jointly in spouses)• Protection against pollution• Protection against floodsAs professionals• Equal participation in national and basin management organizations from local to transboundary level Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org
  15. 15. Thank you for your attention Water for a food-secure world www.iwmi.org

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