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unit design in the
             21st
              century
“I think I’m
   going to cry.”
sti cky ideas?
d dem  ands
flat wor l
     a re different
UbD can help
knowing vs.
understanding?
how many buses does the army
 need to transport 1,128 soldiers if
 each bus holds 36 soldiers?
32
why do balloons in
 a car always
 escape out the
 open window?
Bernoulli’s Principle
scale & proportion vs. creating a
  scale map of the state of Kansas
scale & proportion vs. creating a
  scale map of the state of Kansas
knowing vs.
understanding?
A body of coherent
  facts
Verifiable claims
I know something to
   be true
I respond on cue
   with what I know
A body of coherent    The meaning of the
  facts                  facts
Verifiable claims     Fallible, “in-
             ...
so . . . what does
 “understanding” mean?
“. . . the ability to think and
  act flexibly with what you
  know . . .”
our job as educators?
design instructional units that
 encourage “the flexible use of
 stuff”
how do you do that?
the brain needs structure
kids need structured learning
so what?
we don’t always
provide that
so . . . do we
 need to plan
 our instruction
 & assessment
 differently?
“To begin with the end in mind
  means to start with a clear
  understanding of your destination. It
  means to know where...
identify desired results


   determine acceptable evidence


                 plan learning activities
ntify desired results
ide




                   what is worth
                    understanding?
ine acceptab le evidence
deter m




             what evidence will prove
              student understanding
           ...
an learning activities
pl



               what experiences,
                knowledge and
                skills will pr...
what does it look like?
ntify desired results
ide




                   what is worth
                    understanding?
. . . “big ideas”
characteristics?
Ideas that provide meaning
 • knowledge, not just important facts
Ideas that provide meaning
 • knowledge, not just important facts

Encourage transfer
 • outside school
 • across content
Ideas that provide meaning
 • knowledge, not just important facts

Encourage transfer
 • outside school
 • across content
...
Not hidden from students
Not hidden from students
Can be called the moral of the story
Not hidden from students
Can be called the moral of the story
Aren’t truisms
 • “wars are disruptive”
“players understand that
creating space away from the
ball creates scoring chances”
for World History students, which
  provides important facts and which is
  a Big Idea?
day and year
   udents know the was signed
St
that the Magna Carta


   Students understand the enduri
                   ...
what is worth
 understanding?



     too many standards!
unpack standards to
 narrow down
 choices
 • develop “Big
   Ideas” from nouns
US History indicators
 describes the causes of the American
 Revolution using colonial grievances and
 British policies
 i...
Economics forces can be powerful
 agents for change
Democracy is “hard work”
Individuals can have a huge impact
  on socie...
Your examples?
ine acceptab le evidence
deter m




             what evidence will prove
              student understanding
           ...
what does a good test look
like?
“The most basic and obvious answer
  to that question is that good tests
  measure what you want to
  measure, and bad tes...
“Students should be found innocent
of understanding until convicted by
           a preponderance of the
                 ...
design the assessments before
designing activities
use multiple sources of evidence
use PBL tasks for
 summative assessments
use “traditional”
 tests for formative
 assessments
how should we measure
“understanding?”
Wiley Miller ©1992-2002
Wiley Miller ©1992-2002
use PBL
PBL is:



and has these characteristics:
Is it ever okay to violate the Bill
 of Rights?
How can you develop a valid
 argument so that Congress does the
 right thing concerning the
 compensation of Japanese
 Ame...
Goal
Persuade the US Congress to support your
position concerning financial compensation
Role
Japanese American Citizens L...
Situation
You have been asked to present
arguments during committee hearings on a
bill that would compensate Japanese
Amer...
Standards
Your presentation should be both textual
and visual and include:
   • Accurate data concerning the
     internme...
Based on this example and “What
 Does Problem-Based Learning Look
 Like in the Classroom”

PBL is:

and has these characte...
“A way to organize learning around ill-
  structured problems so that
  students simultaneously acquire new
  knowledge an...
An actual or simulated situation
Problem is “ill-structured”
Student centered
More work than one person can do
 in time al...
No clear solution
Requires a product or action
Students must have a “stakeholder”
“Raw” data
agree?
 disagree?
step

Select knowledge & skills that
 students will demonstrate
 • Based on local & state standards
step

Develop a driving question
 • Organizes and provides focus
 • Thought provoking and invites inquiry
 • Have no simpl...
How can we best protect the Ogallala
 Aquifer?
Can the use of nuclear weapons ever
 be justified?
Which came first - slave...
Problem template
Problem template
How can we central issue . . .
 so that conditions for acceptable
 solution
Problem template
How can we central issue . . .
 so that conditions for acceptable
 solution
Problem template
How can we central issue . . .
 so that conditions for acceptable
 solution

How can we develop a water u...
step

Develop possible product or
 performance task
  • Use GRASPS as a starting point
GRASPS

What is the   Goal?
What is the   Role?
Who is the    Audience?
What is the   Situation?
What is the   Product / P...
can also use the Differentiator




       www.byrdseed.com/differentiator
step

Determine availability of
 resources & tools
 • Books, articles, web sites, computers,
   fax machines, people
step

Map and manage the process
 • Create unit “storyboard”
 • Differentiated instruction
 • Step by step work plan
 • “I...
is your task any good?
authenticity
academic rigor
applied learning
active exploration
adult connections
assessment practices
PB Online
pbl-online.org

Buck Institute
www.bie.org
an learning activities
pl



               what experiences,
                knowledge and
                skills will pr...
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
Unit Design In The 21st Century
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Unit Design In The 21st Century

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Unit Design In The 21st Century

  1. 1. unit design in the 21st century
  2. 2. “I think I’m going to cry.”
  3. 3. sti cky ideas?
  4. 4. d dem ands flat wor l a re different
  5. 5. UbD can help
  6. 6. knowing vs. understanding?
  7. 7. how many buses does the army need to transport 1,128 soldiers if each bus holds 36 soldiers?
  8. 8. 32
  9. 9. why do balloons in a car always escape out the open window?
  10. 10. Bernoulli’s Principle
  11. 11. scale & proportion vs. creating a scale map of the state of Kansas
  12. 12. scale & proportion vs. creating a scale map of the state of Kansas
  13. 13. knowing vs. understanding?
  14. 14. A body of coherent facts Verifiable claims I know something to be true I respond on cue with what I know
  15. 15. A body of coherent The meaning of the facts facts Verifiable claims Fallible, “in- process” theories I know something to I understand why it is be true true I respond on cue I judge when to use with what I know what I know
  16. 16. so . . . what does “understanding” mean?
  17. 17. “. . . the ability to think and act flexibly with what you know . . .”
  18. 18. our job as educators?
  19. 19. design instructional units that encourage “the flexible use of stuff”
  20. 20. how do you do that?
  21. 21. the brain needs structure
  22. 22. kids need structured learning
  23. 23. so what?
  24. 24. we don’t always provide that
  25. 25. so . . . do we need to plan our instruction & assessment differently?
  26. 26. “To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. It means to know where you’re going . . . so that the steps you take are always in the right direction.” Stephen Covey The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People
  27. 27. identify desired results determine acceptable evidence plan learning activities
  28. 28. ntify desired results ide what is worth understanding?
  29. 29. ine acceptab le evidence deter m what evidence will prove student understanding “beyond a reasonable doubt?”
  30. 30. an learning activities pl what experiences, knowledge and skills will promote understanding?
  31. 31. what does it look like?
  32. 32. ntify desired results ide what is worth understanding?
  33. 33. . . . “big ideas”
  34. 34. characteristics?
  35. 35. Ideas that provide meaning • knowledge, not just important facts
  36. 36. Ideas that provide meaning • knowledge, not just important facts Encourage transfer • outside school • across content
  37. 37. Ideas that provide meaning • knowledge, not just important facts Encourage transfer • outside school • across content Measurable
  38. 38. Not hidden from students
  39. 39. Not hidden from students Can be called the moral of the story
  40. 40. Not hidden from students Can be called the moral of the story Aren’t truisms • “wars are disruptive”
  41. 41. “players understand that creating space away from the ball creates scoring chances”
  42. 42. for World History students, which provides important facts and which is a Big Idea?
  43. 43. day and year udents know the was signed St that the Magna Carta Students understand the enduri ng influence of significant docum ents throughout the history of world civilizations
  44. 44. what is worth understanding? too many standards!
  45. 45. unpack standards to narrow down choices • develop “Big Ideas” from nouns
  46. 46. US History indicators describes the causes of the American Revolution using colonial grievances and British policies identifies the ideas included in the Declaration of Independence describes participants and the role of compromise in the creation of the U. S. Constitution explains that the U.S. Constitution is fundamental law
  47. 47. Economics forces can be powerful agents for change Democracy is “hard work” Individuals can have a huge impact on society
  48. 48. Your examples?
  49. 49. ine acceptab le evidence deter m what evidence will prove student understanding “beyond a reasonable doubt?”
  50. 50. what does a good test look like?
  51. 51. “The most basic and obvious answer to that question is that good tests measure what you want to measure, and bad tests do not.” Ben Clay Is This a Trick Question?
  52. 52. “Students should be found innocent of understanding until convicted by a preponderance of the evidence.”
  53. 53. design the assessments before designing activities
  54. 54. use multiple sources of evidence
  55. 55. use PBL tasks for summative assessments
  56. 56. use “traditional” tests for formative assessments
  57. 57. how should we measure “understanding?”
  58. 58. Wiley Miller ©1992-2002
  59. 59. Wiley Miller ©1992-2002
  60. 60. use PBL
  61. 61. PBL is: and has these characteristics:
  62. 62. Is it ever okay to violate the Bill of Rights?
  63. 63. How can you develop a valid argument so that Congress does the right thing concerning the compensation of Japanese Americans interned during WWII?
  64. 64. Goal Persuade the US Congress to support your position concerning financial compensation Role Japanese American Citizens League, White House staff, others Audience “Senate Judiciary Committee”
  65. 65. Situation You have been asked to present arguments during committee hearings on a bill that would compensate Japanese Americans interned during WWII and/or their descendants Product You need to prepare an oral argument for or against the proposed bill
  66. 66. Standards Your presentation should be both textual and visual and include: • Accurate data concerning the internment • Possible consequences of compensation • Amount / Type of compensation • Possible funding sources • Constitutional arguments
  67. 67. Based on this example and “What Does Problem-Based Learning Look Like in the Classroom” PBL is: and has these characteristics:
  68. 68. “A way to organize learning around ill- structured problems so that students simultaneously acquire new knowledge and experience in wrestling with problems.”
  69. 69. An actual or simulated situation Problem is “ill-structured” Student centered More work than one person can do in time allowed
  70. 70. No clear solution Requires a product or action Students must have a “stakeholder” “Raw” data
  71. 71. agree? disagree?
  72. 72. step Select knowledge & skills that students will demonstrate • Based on local & state standards
  73. 73. step Develop a driving question • Organizes and provides focus • Thought provoking and invites inquiry • Have no simple answers • Kid friendly
  74. 74. How can we best protect the Ogallala Aquifer? Can the use of nuclear weapons ever be justified? Which came first - slavery or racism? Who was the best leader? Why is democracy so hard?
  75. 75. Problem template
  76. 76. Problem template How can we central issue . . . so that conditions for acceptable solution
  77. 77. Problem template How can we central issue . . . so that conditions for acceptable solution
  78. 78. Problem template How can we central issue . . . so that conditions for acceptable solution How can we develop a water use policy so that both the natural resources and economy of western Kansas are protected?
  79. 79. step Develop possible product or performance task • Use GRASPS as a starting point
  80. 80. GRASPS What is the Goal? What is the Role? Who is the Audience? What is the Situation? What is the Product / Performance? What are the Standards for evaluation?
  81. 81. can also use the Differentiator www.byrdseed.com/differentiator
  82. 82. step Determine availability of resources & tools • Books, articles, web sites, computers, fax machines, people
  83. 83. step Map and manage the process • Create unit “storyboard” • Differentiated instruction • Step by step work plan • “Improvise” along the way
  84. 84. is your task any good?
  85. 85. authenticity academic rigor applied learning active exploration adult connections assessment practices
  86. 86. PB Online pbl-online.org Buck Institute www.bie.org
  87. 87. an learning activities pl what experiences, knowledge and skills will promote understanding?

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