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Plan, Don't Hope: Using Understanding by Design to Improve Instruction

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Plan, Don't Hope: Using Understanding by Design to Improve Instruction

  1. 1. Plan, don’t just hope! Using UbD to Create Quality Instruction Glenn Wiebe ESSDACK glennw@essdack.org ©2007
  2. 2. “I think I’m going to cry.” Escalator rider
  3. 3. Sticky ideas?
  4. 4. UbD lets teachers “work smarter”
  5. 5. UbD is something you can actually use
  6. 6. But can you tell a good “story?”
  7. 7. How many buses does the army need to transport 1,128 soldiers if each bus holds 36 soldiers?
  8. 8. How many buses does the army need to transport 1,128 soldiers if each bus holds 36 soldiers? • 32
  9. 9. How many buses does the army need to transport 1,128 soldiers if each bus holds 36 soldiers? • 32 • How about 1?
  10. 10. How many buses does the army need to transport 1,128 soldiers if each bus holds 36 soldiers? • 32 • How about 1? • How about 1,128?
  11. 11. Why do balloons in a car always escape out the open window?
  12. 12. Jumping Ping Pong balls?
  13. 13. Bernoulli’s Principle
  14. 14. Scale & proportion vs. creating a scale map of the state of Kansas
  15. 15. Scale & proportion vs. creating a scale map of the state of Kansas
  16. 16. Your stories?
  17. 17. A body of coherent facts Verifiable claims I know something to be true I respond on cue with what I know
  18. 18. The meaning of the A body of coherent facts facts Fallible, “in-process” Verifiable claims theories I know something to I understand why it be true is true I respond on cue I judge when to use with what I know what I know
  19. 19. Which is which?
  20. 20. So . . . what does “understanding” mean?
  21. 21. “. . . the ability to think and act flexibly with what one knows . . .”
  22. 22. Our job as educators?
  23. 23. Design instructional units that encourage “the effective use of stuff,” not merely the learning of stuff
  24. 24. How do you do that?
  25. 25. The brain needs structure
  26. 26. The brain needs structure • Discrete pieces of data = problems • Tries to chunk stuff using current schema
  27. 27. How does your brain work?
  28. 28. You’ve got 20 seconds
  29. 29. How’d ya do?
  30. 30. Write the following number from memory
  31. 31. 17766024365911
  32. 32. You’ve got 20 seconds
  33. 33. How’d ya do?
  34. 34. American Revolution / Declaration of Independence
  35. 35. Minutes / hours / days
  36. 36. Emergencies
  37. 37. • American Revolution / Declaration of Independence • Minutes / hours / days • Emergencies
  38. 38. 1776 60-24-365 911
  39. 39. How good’s your memory?
  40. 40. Candy Dessert Sour Flavor Sugar Snack Tooth Eat Heart Syrup Taste
  41. 41. So what?
  42. 42. Kids need structured learning
  43. 43. We don’t always provide that
  44. 44. Do we need to plan our instruction & assessment differently?
  45. 45. What squares with your beliefs? What’s going around in your head right now?
  46. 46. What steps do “traditional” teachers take when they plan a unit?
  47. 47. Decide what activities the kids will do
  48. 48. Decide what activities the kids will do Organize the activities / Gather the resources
  49. 49. Decide what activities the kids will do Organize the activities / Gather the resources Students complete the activities
  50. 50. Decide what activities the kids will do Organize the activities / Gather the resources Students complete the activities Write the test
  51. 51. Decide what activities the kids will do Organize the activities / Gather the resources Students complete the activities Write the test Give the test / assign the grades
  52. 52. Decide what activities the kids will do Organize the activities / Gather the resources Students complete the activities Write the test Give the test / assign the grades Plan the activities for the next unit
  53. 53. Answer the following questions about the Western Movement handout: • What does the teacher want the students to learn? • What are the students learning? • How does the teacher know?
  54. 54. Are you “traditional?”
  55. 55. “To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. It means to know where you’re going . . . so that the steps you take are always in the right direction.” Stephen Covey The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People
  56. 56. “If you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll get there every time!”
  57. 57. Jay McTighe Grant Wiggins
  58. 58. Identify desired results
  59. 59. Identify desired results  Determine acceptable evidence
  60. 60. Identify desired results  Determine acceptable evidence  Plan learning activities
  61. 61. Identify desired results
  62. 62. What is worth understanding? What questions will stimulate inquiry?
  63. 63. Determine acceptable evidence
  64. 64. What evidence will prove student understanding “beyond a reasonable doubt?”
  65. 65. Design learning activities
  66. 66. What experiences, knowledge and skills will promote understanding?
  67. 67. So . . . plan your customer’s house using blueprints that are clear, concise and based on best practices
  68. 68. What does it look like?
  69. 69. Cheney, KS UbD examples • www.cheney268.com/UbDUnits/ UBDReport.htm
  70. 70. Review the modified Western Movement unit • How does it look different? • Which instruction would you want your own child to receive?
  71. 71. • ASCD video
  72. 72. Understanding by Design video overview • To what extent to these “structures” already exist in your building? • In your own room? • What questions do you have about the process?
  73. 73. What’s your music learning style?
  74. 74. Curse of knowledge
  75. 75. “What is worthy and requiring of understanding?”
  76. 76. “What is worthy and requiring of understanding?” • Problem?
  77. 77. “What is worthy and requiring of understanding?” • Problem? Too many standards! o
  78. 78. “What is worthy and requiring of understanding?” • Problem? Too many standards! o Textbooks don’t help o
  79. 79. Unpack standards to narrow down choices • Develop “Big Ideas” from nouns • Create “Essential Questions” from verbs
  80. 80. Three circle audit
  81. 81. Three circle audit • Decide what “big ideas” your kids have to understand
  82. 82. Three circle audit • Decide what “big ideas” your kids have to understand • Specify “important knowledge & skills”
  83. 83. Three circle audit • Decide what “big ideas” your kids have to understand • Specify “important knowledge & skills” • End with what stuff is “worth being familiar with”
  84. 84. “Big ideas” worth Enduring understandings understanding Important to know & Foundational concepts/skills do Worth being familiar “nice to know” with
  85. 85. For a group of tenth-grade World History students, which circle would these go in? • The day and year the Magna Carta was signed • The enduring influence of significant documents throughout the history of world civilizations • The historical significance of the Magna Carta
  86. 86. Ideas that provide meaning • Wisdom, not just important facts
  87. 87. Ideas that provide meaning • Wisdom, not just important facts Encourage transfer • Outside school • Across content
  88. 88. Ideas that provide meaning • Wisdom, not just important facts Encourage transfer • Outside school • Across content Measurable
  89. 89. Can be called the moral of the story • Revolutionary War?
  90. 90. Can be called the moral of the story • Revolutionary War? Aren’t truisms • Wars are disruptive
  91. 91. Can be called the moral of the story • Revolutionary War? Aren’t truisms • Wars are disruptive Be able to add • “Students understand that . . . ”
  92. 92. “Students understand that creating space away from the ball creates scoring chances”
  93. 93. US History indicators • describes the causes of the American Revolution using colonial grievances and British policies • identifies the ideas included in The Declaration of Independence • describes participants and the role of compromise in the creation of the U. S. Constitution • explains that the U.S. Constitution is fundamental law
  94. 94. Ask yourself: • Why? So what? • How might this be applied outside the classroom? • What could we not do if we didn’t understand this? What “big ideas” can you come up with?
  95. 95. Your examples?
  96. 96. What does “unpacking” look like?
  97. 97. US History indicators • describes the causes of the American Revolution using colonial grievances and British policies • identifies the ideas included in The Declaration of Independence • describes participants and the role of compromise in the creation of the U. S. Constitution • explains that the U.S. Constitution is fundamental law
  98. 98. Economics forces can be very powerful agents for change Democracy is “hard work” Individuals can have a huge impact on society
  99. 99. Use the template
  100. 100. Use the template to create possible “Big Ideas” for a unit you are planning
  101. 101. What is your understanding of Essential Questions? • Fist is you got nothing • Five is you’ve written best selling books about essential questions
  102. 102. How much deeper would the ocean be without sponges?
  103. 103. How much deeper would the ocean be without sponges? What do people in China call their good plates?
  104. 104. How much deeper would the ocean be without sponges? What do people in China call their good plates? Why are there Interstates in Hawaii?
  105. 105. How much deeper would the ocean be without sponges? What do people in China call their good plates? Why are there Interstates in Hawaii? If they squeeze olives to get olive oil, how do they get baby oil?
  106. 106. How much deeper would the ocean be without sponges? What do people in China call their good plates? Why are there Interstates in Hawaii? If they squeeze olives to get olive oil, how do they get baby oil? If a Smurf is choking, what color does it become?
  107. 107. Why essential questions?
  108. 108. A good question: • Leads students to Big idea • Provides structure for planning • Invites student inquiry • Suggests assessment ideas
  109. 109. Common characteristics?
  110. 110. The answer can’t be Googled • Must be created
  111. 111. The answer can’t be Googled • Must be created Generates more questions
  112. 112. The answer can’t be Googled • Must be created Generates more questions Kid friendly
  113. 113. The answer can’t be Googled • Must be created Generates more questions Kid friendly Short and sweet
  114. 114. Aligned with enduring understanding • The answer leads to Big Idea Reside at the top of Bloom’s • Evaluate / Synthesize / Analyze • Lots of whys and hows
  115. 115. What is the best Economics forces form of can be agents government? for change Why do revolutions Democracy is happen? “hard work” How could someone Individuals can suggest that the US have a huge Revolution wasn’t impact on really a revolution? society
  116. 116. No Yes
  117. 117. No Yes What is the relationship between popularity & greatness in literature?
  118. 118. No Yes What is the relationship between  popularity & greatness in literature?
  119. 119. No Yes What is the relationship between  popularity & greatness in literature? When was the Magna Carta signed & by whom?
  120. 120. No Yes What is the relationship between  popularity & greatness in literature? When was the Magna Carta signed &  by whom?
  121. 121. No Yes What is the relationship between  popularity & greatness in literature? When was the Magna Carta signed &  by whom? What is hibernation?
  122. 122. No Yes What is the relationship between  popularity & greatness in literature? When was the Magna Carta signed &  by whom? What is hibernation? 
  123. 123. No Yes What is the relationship between  popularity & greatness in literature? When was the Magna Carta signed &  by whom? What is hibernation?  Which European colonial power has the worst legacy?
  124. 124. No Yes What is the relationship between  popularity & greatness in literature? When was the Magna Carta signed &  by whom? What is hibernation?  Which European colonial power has  the worst legacy?
  125. 125. No Yes
  126. 126. No Yes What is a linear equation?
  127. 127. No Yes What is a linear equation? 
  128. 128. No Yes What is a linear equation?  Is prejudice more a view of class or race?
  129. 129. No Yes What is a linear equation?  Is prejudice more a view of class or  race?
  130. 130. No Yes What is a linear equation?  Is prejudice more a view of class or  race? What are the components of a unicameral legislature?
  131. 131. No Yes What is a linear equation?  Is prejudice more a view of class or  race? What are the components of a  unicameral legislature?
  132. 132. No Yes What is a linear equation?  Is prejudice more a view of class or  race? What are the components of a  unicameral legislature? When did the United States become a superpower?
  133. 133. No Yes What is a linear equation?  Is prejudice more a view of class or  race? What are the components of a  unicameral legislature? When did the United States become a  superpower?
  134. 134. Build on previous Big Ideas & create Essential Questions
  135. 135. Determine acceptable evidence
  136. 136. Self assessment in packet • What does this “data” tell you?
  137. 137. Design the assessments before designing lessons and activities
  138. 138. “Students should be found innocent of understanding until convicted by a preponderance of the evidence.”
  139. 139. Use multiple sources of evidence
  140. 140. Focus on performance tasks
  141. 141. Wiley Miller ©1992-2002
  142. 142. Wiley Miller ©1992-2002
  143. 143. How do you measure “understanding?”
  144. 144. Use the Six Facets
  145. 145. Explanation / knowledgeable accounts of the facts • A student provides an accurate review of the causes of the Revolutionary War
  146. 146. Explanation / knowledgeable accounts of the facts • A student provides an accurate review of the causes of the Revolutionary War Interpretation / narratives that provide meaning • A student shows how Wizard of Oz can be read as a commentary of the late 1800s United States
  147. 147. Application / use of knowledge in new contexts • A student uses his knowledge of statistics to project next year’s costs & needs for the student run snack shop
  148. 148. Application / use of knowledge in new contexts • A student uses his knowledge of statistics to project next year’s costs & needs for the student run snack shop Perspective / insightful points of view • A student can effectively argue both sides of the evolution argument
  149. 149. Empathy / ability to “see” another’s feelings and world view • A student empathizes with the difficulties experienced by a newly arrived Latino student
  150. 150. Empathy / ability to “see” another’s feelings and world view • A student empathizes with the difficulties experienced by a newly arrived Latino student Self-Knowledge / understanding one’s thoughts & actions • A student reads her own feelings about “different” people & how they may influence her choice of friends
  151. 151. What does the perfect assessment look like?
  152. 152. Clear & challenging standards Failure encouraged Choice Authenticity Rich content Compelling
  153. 153. Focus on possible performance tasks • Use the GRASPS template in packet as a guide • The “Generating Ideas for Performance Tasks” is also helpful
  154. 154. What is the Goal? What is the Role? Who is the Audience? What is the Situation? What is the Product / performance? What are the Standards for evaluation?
  155. 155. How good is your task? • Use the rubric
  156. 156. “Learning is not the core business of schools.”
  157. 157. “Learning . . . is what happens when schools do their business right.”
  158. 158. Zelda for the Wii Sports Geocaching
  159. 159. Why do kids enjoy these things?
  160. 160. The business of schools is to create high-quality work for students that is:
  161. 161. The business of schools is to create high-quality work for students that is: • Challenging
  162. 162. The business of schools is to create high-quality work for students that is: • Challenging • Interesting
  163. 163. The business of schools is to create high-quality work for students that is: • Challenging • Interesting • Satisfying
  164. 164. Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman ©2001
  165. 165. When are students most engaged?
  166. 166. When are students How do students learn most engaged? most effectively?
  167. 167. When are students How do students learn most engaged? most effectively? Work kids should be doing!
  168. 168. “What learning experiences & teaching promote understanding, interest, and excellence?” • Use the WHERETO approach as a guide
  169. 169. Where are we headed? Why are we going there?
  170. 170. • Think purposely about communicating the end result • Bulletin Board • Pre-test • K-W-L
  171. 171. Hook the students through engaging & provocative entry points
  172. 172. • Bermuda Triangle problem • Emotional connections • DEI
  173. 173. Students must experience the “big ideas” realistically & be equipped for final performance • Demonstration • Scaffolding • PBL • Simulation / gaming • Graphic organizer
  174. 174. What will cause students to revise/ refine more deeply on the “big ideas?” • Teacher modeling their ideas • Small / large group discussion • Peer review / “Rovers” • Video taped rehearsals
  175. 175. How can I encourage students to rethink / reflect on their work? • Mini-workshops with struggling students • Blogs • Teacher ask students to develop alternative solutions • “Expert” student led mini-groups
  176. 176. How will I promote self-evaluation by students? • Clear / concise rubrics • Use self-evaluation survey
  177. 177. How will I tailor the learning activities and my teaching to address the different needs, interests and profiles of my students? • Differentianted Instruction
  178. 178. How will the experiences be organized to maximize engaging and effective learning? • Linear sequence may not be the best • Think “on-demand” learning • WebQuests
  179. 179. Create a rough draft of Stage Three Focus on just the W & H? • Use the samples in packet as a guide
  180. 180. Use “rubrics” to evaluate your unit design
  181. 181. Have any of you ever actually built a house?
  182. 182. Have any of you ever actually built a house? • Had one built?
  183. 183. Have any of you ever actually built a house? • Had one built? • Watched one built?
  184. 184. Have any of you ever actually built a house? • Had one built? • Watched one built? • Lived in one?
  185. 185. Have any of you ever actually built a house? • Had one built? • Watched one built? • Lived in one? • Know what one is?
  186. 186. Have any of you ever actually built a house? • Had one built? • Watched one built? • Lived in one? • Know what one is? We are going to mentally de-construct a house
  187. 187. The blueprints and plans are / is to building a house as Understanding by Design is to teaching.
  188. 188. The blueprints and plans are to building a house as Understanding by Design is to teaching.
  189. 189. How can UbD help you get off the escalator? What do you need to be careful about?
  190. 190. McTighe, Jay, Grant Wiggins. 2005. Understanding by Design Tomlinson, Carol Ann. 1999. The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of All Learners McTighe, Jay; Carol Ann Tomlinson. 2006. Integrating Differentiated Instruction + Understanding by Design
  191. 191. Differentiating Instruction For Advanced Learners In the Mixed-Ability Middle School Classroom • www.kidsource.com/kidsource/content/ diff_instruction.html Differentiated Instruction • members.shaw.ca/priscillatheroux/ differentiating.html
  192. 192. Understanding by Design Exchange • www.ubdexchange.org Authentic Education • www.grantwiggins.org/ubd.html Cheney, KS UbD examples • www.cheney268.com/UbDUnits/ UBDReport.htm UBD and Education • xnet.rrc.mb.ca/glenh/ understanding_by_design.htm

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